Learn More About the Sphynx Cat

It’s safe to say that Sphynx cats are some of the most unique felines out there, with their bat-like ears, wide eyes, and completely hairless bodies. Below, your Roanoke, VA veterinarian tells you more about this cat breed.

The Sphynx’s History

Records of hairless cats in North America date back to the early 1900s, but today’s modern Sphynx cat dates from 1966 in Toronto, Canada. There, a pair of domestic shorthairs produced a hairless litter because of a random genetic fluke, and the Sphynx breed was born. Now, the gene pool of the Sphynx cat is large and stable.

Care Needs

Sphynx’s care requirements are largely the same as other cats, but they do need some extra attention when it comes to the skin. Sun exposure must be limited, as they can get sunburnt easily, and they’ll need frequent baths. That’s because, without fur, excess body oil doesn’t get removed from the surface of their skin.

The Sphynx’s Temperament

Sphynxes are high-energy cats with hearty metabolisms, and they’re generally friendly, intelligent, and amusing animals. They make great pets for almost any family, including those with children!

Want to learn more about the Sphynx cat? Call your vet clinic Roanoke, VA.

Why Your Cat Is Ignoring Her Litter Box

Litter box aversions aren’t uncommon amongst our feline friends! If your cat has seemingly given up on using her powder room, it’s time to make a change. Here, your veterinarian Washington DC tells you why your cat might be avoiding her bathroom and what to do about it.

Cleanliness

Cats don’t like to use a dirty bathroom; who can blame them? If you don’t clean out your cat’s litter box often enough, she might avoid it entirely. Scoop out the box on a daily basis, and change the litter entirely about once a week or so.

Placement

Did you know that it’s very important where your cat’s bathroom is located? Much like humans, cats prefer to do their business in an area where they won’t be disturbed. Place your cat’s box in a quiet, low-key area of the house where she can use it in peace. In most homes, a laundry room, basement, or bathroom works well.

Medical Concerns

Of course, it’s possible that medical concerns—injury, infection, and much more—could be the root cause of your cat’s aversion to her litter box. Contact your vet clinic Washington DC right away if you think this might be the case.

Rescue Pet Myths About Cats and Dogs

Unfortunately, there are several myths floating around when it comes to animal shelters and the pets inside of them. Allow your veterinarian Murrieta, CA to tell you the truth—here are three rescue pet myths that you shouldn’t believe:

Rescue Pets Are Old

Think rescue pets are old, unwanted animals? Not true. Pets of almost any age can be found in a shelter; elderly companions, middle-aged pets, and puppies and kittens alike! No matter the age of pet you’re considering, tour your local shelters to find it.

Rescue Pets Are Poorly Behaved

This isn’t true. Pets don’t often come to shelters because of poor behavior; issues like abandonment and uncontrolled breeding are far more common reasons. Most rescue pets are well-behaved or can be easily trained!

Rescue Pets Are Dirty

False! On the contrary, rescue facilities must be kept at a high standard of cleanliness and sanitation to prevent the spread of disease in an area with so many animals housed in close quarters. Shelter pets aren’t dirty!

Have you recently adopted a pet and need to make an appointment for their initial vaccinations and examination? We’re here to help. Set up an office visit at your vet clinic Murrieta, CA.

Xylitol and Its Danger for Your Pet

Have you ever heard of xylitol? It’s a sugar substitute found in many candies, gums, baked goods, and other products, like toothpaste. Xylitol is fine for humans, but very bad for pets! Learn more here from a vet Crown Point, IN.

Symptoms

The symptoms of xylitol can manifest themselves in as little as 30 minutes after your pet ingests something containing the poison. Symptoms include lethargy, uncoordinated movements, loss of appetite, and—without prompt treatment—seizures, coma, and even death. Rush your pet to the emergency room if you know or suspect that they’ve ingested xylitol.

Treatment

Your pet’s stomach may need to be flushed to rid the body of the toxin, and activated charcoal might help slow the absorption rate in body. As a pet recovers, supportive measures like fluid replacement and oxygen supplementation might be necessary.

How to Prevent Poisoning

As is the case with all poisonings, it’s easier to prevent xylitol poisoning than deal with it! Keep chocolate, candies, and all sweets out of your pet’s reach—store them in closed containers, cabinets, or the refrigerator.

Want to learn more about xylitol and other dangerous pet poisons? We’re here for you. Call your veterinarian Crown Point, IN.

How to Exercise Your Indoor Cat

It’s easy for an indoor cat to lay around all day, packing on the pounds and becoming unhealthier as time goes on. It’s up to you to exercise your feline friend! Here are three tips on exercising your indoor cat from a veterinarian Newmarket, ON.

Toys

What better way to get your cat moving than with a few fun toys? Toys let your cat exercise her body while having fun, and they encourage her to use her natural hunting and stalking instincts. Be sure to provide your cat with a few good toys at all times.

Cat Furniture

Cat towers allow your cat to exercise herself, even when you’re not at home, and they give her a high vantage point from which to survey her territory. Many cat towers even come with built-in toys and scratching posts! Browse the selection at your local pet supply store.

Catnip

If you’re having trouble enticing your cat into playing, why not use a bit of catnip? Sprinkle catnip on your cat’s toys or scratching post, and watch her go wild!

Does your cat need veterinary attention? Do you need vaccinations or pest-control medications for your pet? Call your animal hospital Newmarket, ON today.

Keeping Your Dog Safe When It’s Hot

Generally speaking, our dogs and extremely hot weather don’t mix. After all, Fido is covered in a layer of fur that he can’t take off! Here, your veterinarian Las Vegas, NV lists three easy ways to make sure your dog stays safe during hot weather.

Hydrate

The best thing to do for your dog when it’s hot is to provide him with a full dish of clean, cool, fresh water to drink from at all times. This keeps your pooch properly hydrated and staves off deadly heat exhaustion and dehydration. You can even add a few ice cubes to Fido’s dish on extremely hot days.

Limit Exercise

Don’t over-exercise your pet in hot weather, because it’s a quick way to have your dog develop heatstroke. Try to exercise your pooch in the early morning or evening hours, when it’s not so hot outside, and keep sessions short to make sure your dog doesn’t get overworked.

Pest Control

Keep your pet safe from fleas, ticks, worms, and other warm-weather pets with proper parasite control. Talk to your veterinarian if your dog needs preventatives.

Call your vet clinic Las Vegas, NV right away to learn more about hot-weather safety tips for dogs.

Putting Your Pet on a Diet

While a large part of helping your pet to lose weight involves exercising them, you can’t forget about the other side of the equation: improving their diet. Here, your Aurora, CO vet tells you about three important components of putting your pet on a diet.

Food Choice

It’s important to think about the type of food your pet is being given. If they’re receiving a “budget” diet with a lot of filler material and empty calories, they’re not getting the nutrients they need for good health. They’re also probably packing on excess pounds! Ask your vet about upgrading to a premium diet.

Scheduled Meals

Work with your vet to determine a schedule for mealtimes, setting food out and then removing it after a predetermined amount of time. This prevents your pet from overeating, and it helps to regulate her diet and weight.

Portion Control

Last but not least, make sure to ask your veterinarian about a measured portion size for your pet’s meals. Portion control is an essential part of any great diet plan!

Do you need help getting your pet to lose weight? We’re here to help with all of your pet-care needs. Call your vet clinic Aurora, CO.

Chocolate Poisoning in Your Cat

While your cat might not seek out chocolate to eat, it’s not worth the risk. Any cat can ingest something they shouldn’t, especially a curious kitten! Below, your Rochester, NY veterinarian tells you about the symptoms and treatment of chocolate poisoning, as well as how to prevent the issue entirely.

Symptoms

The symptoms of chocolate poisoning in cats includes increased heart rate, rapid breathing, low blood pressure, vomiting and diarrhea, and—without treatment—seizures, coma, and heart failure. Symptoms can vary in severity depending on the type and amount of chocolate ingested.

Treatment

A cat’s stomach may need to be flushed to rid the system of the remaining toxin in the gut. Your veterinarian might put your cat on fluid therapy to help them recover, and a plain diet might need to be given after the fact until your cat is fully healed.

Prevention

Keep chocolate of any kind far out of your cat’s reach—rather than leaving it out on countertops or tables, put chocolate in closed cabinets, containers, or the refrigerator so that no pet has a chance of getting their paws on it.

Want to know more about chocolate toxicity? Contact your Rochester, NY veterinary clinic today.

Learn About Fluffy’s Favorite Plant

If you’ve tried catnip on your feline friend, you’ve probably seen the amusing reactions: cats tend to dart this way and that in an excited manner, and some simply stretch out in a state of bliss. How much do you really know about your cat’s favorite plant? Learn more here from a veterinarian London, ON.

What is Catnip, Anyway?

Catnip is an herb, similar to mint. It grows in the wild, but you’ll purchase a dried, processed version in a pet store. Catnip can also be infused into sprays or included in cat toys.

What Causes the Reaction?

The oils of the catnip plant contain a chemical substance, nepetalactone, that triggers a reaction in your cat’s brain. It’s perfectly harmless, and the effects only last a few minutes or so.

Why Isn’t My Cat Reacting?

Is your cat seemingly unaffected by catnip? Don’t worry—your pet is perfectly healthy. It turns out that cats need a particular gene, inherited from their parents, to experience the chemical reaction caused by nepetalactone. If they don’t have it, catnip won’t do much at all!

Learn more about catnip and your cat’s behavior by calling your animal hospital London, ON.

Your Pet and Probiotics

Probiotics have been around in the human healthcare world for some time, and you may have even tried some yourself. Did you know that probiotics can also help our four-legged friends? Learn more about probiotics and your pet from your Frisco, TX veterinarian.

What Are Probiotics?

A probiotic is a beneficial microbe that lives in your pet’s small or large intestine. They help to keep the “bad” microbes from affecting your pet’s health by helping to digest food, manufacture vitamins and other nutrients, and destroy pathogens. For pets, a probiotic might come in capsule or tablet form, a yogurt or kefir product, or it may be included in pet food.

What Can Probiotics Do for Pets?

Probiotics may be given to pets to help regulate digestive health, manage or correct infections and infestations, or even to help minimize stress. Since probiotics help maintain the proper intestinal microbial balance, they’re often prescribed to help with many kinds of health issues that cause digestive problems.

Does My Pet Need a Probiotic?

Don’t give your pet a probiotic until clearing it with your veterinarian. That way, you make sure your pet stays safe!

To learn more, contact your pet clinic Frisco, TX today.