How Antioxidants Benefit Your Dog or Cat

Antioxidants are found in many human foods and offer plenty of benefits. The same is true for your pet! Below, your veterinarian London, ON explains how antioxidants in your pet’s diet help them live a healthier life.

They Boost the Immune System

Free radicals are harmful agents in your pet’s system that contain oxygen. Antioxidants, as the name suggests, counter oxygen and therefore fight against free radicals. In effect, this boosts your pet’s immune system functionality. Antioxidants are especially helpful for sick pets, pets who have been exposed to toxins, or a pet who isn’t receiving the right nutrition.

They Slow Down Aging

Well, that’s partially true—nothing can really “slow” the aging process. But antioxidants have been shown to keep older pets’ brains functioning at higher levels. That’s why you’ll usually find antioxidants in senior pet food!

They Keep Food Fresh

Another key benefit of antioxidants is that they keep your pet’s food fresh. Oxygen tends to spoil food over long periods of time, thanks to the process known as oxidation. Antioxidants slow that process down, keeping food fresher for longer.

Want advice on your pet’s diet and nutrition? That’s where we come in. Contact your animal hospital London, ON.

Quick Tips to Boost Fido’s Coat Quality

It’s up to you to keep your dog’s coat in good shape. After all, Fido isn’t as good as our feline friends when it comes to grooming himself. Use these tips from an animal hospital Anderson, IN to make sure your dog’s coat quality stays in top form.

Feed the Right Food

What your dog eats has a lot to do with how he looks on the outside. That’s because good nutrition benefits your pup’s skin and hair follicles, creating a healthy, smooth, shiny coat. Ask your vet for a recommendation on a great diet choice for your dog.

Brush Regularly

Brush your dog on a regular basis for maximum coat health. Brushing not only traps loose fur in the brush to prevent hair from winding up all over your home, but it’s also good for your dog’s skin and fur.

Bathe Occasionally

Bathing your dog every once in a while is another good way to keep the skin and fur clean. Don’t bathe too frequently, though—this can dry out the skin and fur, leading to a dull, coarse coat and more shedding. And always use a canine-formulated shampoo!

For more tips on good coat care, contact your pet clinic Anderson, IN.

Getting Your Puppy to Sleep Through the Night

Have you brought home a puppy recently? One of the biggest challenges for many puppy owners is getting their furry companion to sleep through the night. It’s easier said than done, and it’s not a perfect science, but here are some tips from a vet Aurora, CO to help your pup stay asleep for as long as possible.

Wear Little Fido Out Before Bed

When you exercise your puppy vigorously a short time before bed, he or she will wear themselves out and be more likely to fall into a deep sleep for the majority of the night. Just make sure to time it right—you don’t want to amp up your puppy a few minutes before bed because then he won’t be sleepy for a long time.

Final Bathroom Break

Make sure your puppy has used the bathroom outdoors one final time before bed. If little Fido has to pee or poop overnight, he’ll be sure to whine and let you know.

Make the Crate Appealing

When your puppy’s crate is appealing, he’s more likely to relax in it. Include a soft blanket and a fun chew toy.

For help with puppy care, call your animal hospital Aurora, CO.

Can My Dog Get Ringworm?

It’s easy to mistake ringworm for what it sounds like—a parasitic worm. But that’s not true. Ringworm is actually a fungal infection, named for the red ring shape that appears on human skin! Learn more about ringworm in dogs as your vet Murrieta, CA elaborates below:

Ringworm Symptoms

Dogs typically contract ringworm when they come in contact with the fungal spores in their environment or if they have physical contact with another infected animal. Symptoms of infection include hair loss, crusted spots or scales on the surface of the skin, and hair that easily falls out when your dog is touched.

Ringworm Treatment

Ringworm is usually treated with a combination of oral medicines and topical lotions or shampoos that are applied to your dog’s skin. It will be necessary to quarantine your dog from other pets in the home so that the infection doesn’t spread—make sure to wear gloves and other protective gear to avoid contracting the infection yourself.

How to Prevent Ringworm

Keeping your dog away from any known carriers in your home or neighborhood is the best preventative measure to avoid ringworm infections.

Call your animal hospital Murrieta, CA to learn more about your dog’s health.

Keeping Your Dog Happy When It’s Hot

Summers in our area can get extremely hot, and your dog is wearing a fur coat that he can’t take off. That’s why it’s important for you to keep your dog healthy and happy during the hottest months of the year! Use these tips from a veterinarian Lewisville, TX to do just that:

Hydrate

Provide your dog with a dish of cool, freshwater to drink from at all times. Hydration is key for preventing deadly heat stroke and heat exhaustion, and it’s essential for almost every bodily function as well. Check your dog’s dish regularly and refill it if necessary.

Provide Indoor Time

When it’s extremely hot outdoors, don’t leave your dog out for extended periods of time. That’s only inviting dehydration and heatstroke. Instead, keep outdoor time to a minimum and allow your dog to relax indoors, where it’s air-conditioned and comfortable.

Keep the Paws in Mind

When walking your dog—ideally in the cooler morning or evening hours—pay attention to hot asphalt surfaces, which can heat up dramatically and burn your dog’s sensitive paw pads.

For more tips on summertime health and safety, contact your veterinary clinic Lewisville, TX today. We’re here for you and your dog!

Fun Facts About Fido’s Nose

As you can imagine, your dog uses his nose for much of his daily function. In addition to smelling and breathing, your dog’s nose is an important organ in an evolutionary and biological sense, as it helps him find a mate, locate food, and avoid predators. Learn more about your dog’s nose in this article from a pet clinic in Frisco, TX.

Your Dog’s Nose is Strong

Your dog’s sense of smell is much better than your own. Dogs have up to 300 million olfactory receptors in their noses, compared to about 6 million in a human nose. The sense of smell is your canine friend’s most powerful sense!

Some Noses Smell Better Than Others

Every dog has a powerful nose, but some breeds top the charts. Hound dogs, in particular, are known for their smelling prowess, and working dogs like German Shepherds and Labradors are also strong smellers. Brachycephalic breeds like pugs and Boston terriers are probably worse smellers, thanks to their compromised airways.

Dogs Can Inhale and Exhale at the Same Time

Dogs actually breathe in and out at the same time when they’re sniffing, creating a circulating airflow. Who knew?

Call your vet clinic Frisco, TX to learn more.

3 Easy Steps for Brushing Fido’s Teeth

We’re willing to bet that your dog’s breath doesn’t smell like a field of lilies. But did you know that you can help your dog’s breath smell better, and keep his oral health in good condition, simply by brushing the teeth? Do so with these easy steps from a vet New Orleans, LA.

Gather Your Supplies

First things first: get together everything you’ll need to brush Fido’s teeth. This includes a pet toothbrush, a canine-specific toothpaste (never use toothpaste made for humans), and a few tasty dog treats. Now, sit down with your dog in a quiet, well-lit area of the home to get started.

Introduce the Paste and Brush

Let your dog smell and taste the toothpaste at first, and try rubbing your finger along his gums to get him acclimated to the brushing sensation. When he’s ready, dab a bit of paste on the brush to begin.

Brush the Teeth

Give each area of the mouth a good scrub with the paste and brush. Focus on the outer tooth surfaces, where plaque accumulates. Finish off with a dog treat to reward Fido for a job well done.

For help with brushing, contact your pet clinic New Orleans, LA.

Quick Tips for Good Canine Coat Care

When was the last time you tended to Fido’s coat? Our canine friends aren’t quite the consummate self-groomers that cats are. Use these tips from vets Virginia Beach, VA to make sure your dog’s coat of fur stays in great shape.

Brush Regularly

It’s always a good idea to brush your dog’s coat on a regular basis. Brushing not only keeps your dog’s coat smooth and dirt-free, it reduces shedding. That’s because the act of brushing traps loose fur in the brush itself, and it spreads essential skin oils through the coat to moisturize it naturally.

Bathing Tips

Bathe your dog thoroughly with a specialized shampoo made specifically for dogs. And don’t bathe too often—this can actually dry out your pup’s fur and skin, leading to a dull coat and more shedding.

Feed a Good Diet

Were you aware that your dog’s diet has a great deal to do with his coat quality? When Fido is fed a poor diet, the coat is one of the first things to suffer. So, make sure your pooch receives high-quality food in the proper portion size.

Make your canine friend’s next office appointment with your veterinary clinic Virginia Beach, VA.

Pet Toxins at Home

We tend to think of our homes as the safest places for our pets to be. And that’s correct. But it’s also important to be aware that almost every home contains a few potential pet toxins! Here, your veterinarian Bend, OR tells you what to watch out for:

Toxic Foods

Onions, garlic, chocolate, candy, grapes and raisins, macadamia nuts, caffeinated foods and beverages, fatty foods, alcohol… the list of potentially harmful human foods for pets goes on and on. Store dangerous food in closed containers, cabinets, or the refrigerator so your pet can’t gain access.

Human Medication

Medicines like antidepressants, cough syrup, and many common painkillers can prove toxic to pets. Even medications that are prescribed to pets can be dangerous in the wrong dosage! Store human medicine carefully, and follow dosing instructions to the letter when you’re giving your pet their own medications.

Poisonous Plants

There’s a long list of poisonous plants and flowers for pets. Dieffenbachia, elephant ear, philodendron, lilies, the sago palm, and chrysanthemums are just a few examples. Do your research to make sure your pet stays safe!

Want more advice on keeping your pet happy and healthy at home? Call your vet clinic Bend, OR.

Help Your Dog With His Thunderstorm Anxiety

Many of our canine companions are scared of thunderstorms. In addition to the loud booms and bright flashes, it’s possible that dogs sense changes in air pressure and static electricity, likely frightening them even further. Here, your vet Gresham, OR tells you how to help combat your dog’s storm anxiety.

Distract

This works best for young dogs, especially puppies. Simply distract your pet while storms are rolling in by playing with a fun toy, or lead them around the house with a few tasty treats. It’s likely that your pup will be so mesmerized that they won’t even notice what’s going on outside!

Safe Zone

Create a safe zone in a quiet area of the house with no windows. Include a pet bed, a few soft blankets, and some of your pet’s favorite toys. When bad weather approaches, lead your dog to this area and stay with him there until the storm passes.

See the Vet

If your dog has severe episodes of anxiety during thunderstorms, you might need to seek professional help. Desensitization techniques or even anxiety medication could be used to help your pup feel better during summer storms. Talk to your veterinarian Gresham, OR for more information.