Pet Vaccination 101

Vaccinating your pet early on in life is one of the best things you’ll ever do for their health and happiness. Preventing dangerous diseases ahead of time is far easier than treating them! Learn about the basics of pet vaccination below from your Savannah, GA veterinarian.

Core Vaccines

All pets need what are called the core vaccines, considered essential for all pets because the diseases they prevent are particularly dangerous and/or contagious. Some examples include the vaccines for distemper, feline leukemia, parvovirus, rabies, Lyme disease, and hepatitis.

Non-Core Vaccines

Non-core vaccines aren’t considered necessary for every pet, but they can help some. They’re administered on a case-by-case basis depending on factors like location, environment, pre-existing health conditions, age, etc. The Bordetella vaccine is one example; it protects against kennel cough, so a pet who will be boarded commonly may benefit from the vaccination.

Vaccination Scheduling

Most vaccines will need booster shots every year or every few years to remain effective. Many pet owners have their companion’s vaccinations updated as necessary at one of their pet’s annual appointments. Talk to your veterinarian for more information on your pet’s vaccination schedule.

Contact your veterinary clinic Savannah, GA to have your pet vaccinated.

Your Cat’s Hairball Basics

If you own a cat, it’s a safe bet that you deal with the occasional hairball. It’s a part of life for most of our feline friends! How much do you know about your cat’s hairballs, though? Are they dangerous? Find out more here from a Westminster, MD vet.

Why Do Hairballs Form?

When your cat licks herself for grooming, the tongue picks up a lot of loose fur, which your cat swallows. Most of this ingested hair moves through the digestive system and gets expelled in your cat’s fecal matter, but some of it remains in the gut. That hair clumps together in the form of a hairball, which will eventually be regurgitated.

Are Hairballs Safe?

Yes, the occasional hairball is perfectly normal and safe. If your cat is coughing up hairballs frequently, though, see the vet; something could be causing her to shed too much. Also, any cat who is vomiting frequently should be examined by a vet promptly.

How Can I Lessen Hairball Production?

Feed your cat a great diet to minimize shedding, and brush her regularly to remove loose fur. Your feline friend will thank you!

Learn more about hairballs by calling your veterinarian Westminster, MD.

Is Your Dog Shedding Excessively?

Almost all of our canine companions shed their fur. It’s a natural part of life for dogs, but sometimes it can become excessive. If you’re finding buckets of fur around your home, it’s time to address the issue. Learn more here from a vet Washington, DC.

Brush the Coat

One thing you can do daily to help control your dog’s excess shedding is to brush his fur. Running a brush or comb through the coat traps loose hair in the implement itself, preventing it from winding up all over your carpets, furniture, and clothing.

Improve the Diet

Your dog’s diet is directly related to his coat quality. When Fido receives the proper nutrition through his food, the skin and hair stays healthy. When your dog is eating a poor diet, on the other hand, the coat becomes dry, coarse, and dull. Upgrade your dog’s diet and see an almost immediate decrease in shedding!

See Your Vet

Still can’t reign in your dog’s excessive shedding? It’s time to see the vet. Medical issues like parasitic infestation, skin infection, and much more could be the root cause!

Contact your veterinary clinic Washington, DC today to set up your dog’s next office visit.

Pet Toxins You Have in Your Home

That’s right—you have a few pet toxins in your home already, no matter how conscientious you are about pet safety. When you’re aware of the hazards, you can keep your animal companion safe! Here, your veterinarian London, ON tells you more.

Toxic Foods

All sorts of human foods are dangerous for pets. The list includes chocolate and candy, garlic, onions, chives, leeks, scallions, shallots, grapes and raisins, salty foods, rich or buttery foods, and alcohol, among others. Keep your pet away!

Cleaning Supplies

It’s safe to say that almost any cleaning product shouldn’t be ingested by your pet. Everything from carpet cleaner and furniture polish to household disinfectants and bleach can cause serious harm. Keep cleaning supplies safely locked away in the supply closet where pets can’t reach.

Plants and Flowers

There are plenty of plants and flowers that are toxic to pets, including Amaryllis, dieffenbachia, elephant ear, ivy, oleander, rhododendron (also called azalea), philodendron, the sago palm, lilies, daffodils, tulips, and more. Check your home for common offenders, and remove them so that your pet can’t gain access.

To learn more about pet toxins already in your home, contact your vet London, ON. We’re always here to help!

Understanding Pet Antibiotics

Did you know that antibiotics are very commonly used in veterinary medicine as well as in human healthcare? Below, your vet Roanoke, VA tells you more about antibiotics for our animal friends.

What Do Antibiotics Do for My Pet?

Antibiotics kill bacteria that is in or on your pet’s body. They work by weakening bacteria, interfering with bacteria cells’ ability to repair themselves, or stopping the bacteria from multiplying. Antibiotics do not treat viruses, so an antibiotic wouldn’t be prescribed to a pet suffering from a viral infection unless a secondary bacterial infection has developed.

How Are Antibiotics Given to Pets?

Some antibiotics come in pill or tablet form, while some are given in topical form and get applied directly to your pet’s skin in the form of a gel or ointment. Certain antibiotics must be given with food to improve absorption rates, while others must be given on an empty stomach.

Is There Any Risk of Side Effects?

There is a chance that some pets could experience symptoms like vomiting or diarrhea. Let your vet know right away if your pet doesn’t seem to be responding well to an antibiotic.

Learn more by contacting your veterinary clinic Roanoke, VA.

Heartworm Myths About Your Pet

Heartworm is one of the most dangerous pest infestations that our dogs and cats can suffer from. Heartworms are easily spread by mosquitoes, so the problem is also quite common! Here, your Aurora, CO vet tells you about three heartworm myths you shouldn’t believe:

Heartworm is Only Seasonal

Heartworm tends to be more of a problem in warm weather, yes, but that doesn’t mean it goes away once temperatures start dropping. Heartworm can affect pets in the spring and well into the autumn months, so you must keep your pet on preventatives year-round.

Heartworm Only Affects Dogs

Dogs are the most susceptible pets to heartworm, but it can also affect cats occasionally and is also a danger to ferrets and other pets. Ask your veterinary professional if your pet will benefit from regular heartworm preventative.

Heartworm Isn’t Fatal

This couldn’t be further from the truth. If a heartworm infestation isn’t caught early enough, it can cause serious health problems, including death. Additionally, treating heartworm once it’s taken hold is risky, and pets must be closely monitored until they’ve returned to full health.

Would you like to set your pet up with heartworm preventatives? Contact your veterinary clinic Aurora, CO.

The Dangers of Marijuana for Dogs

Veterinarians have seen an increase in marijuana ingestion and poisoning in dogs, especially as the drug continues to become legalized in several states. It’s not safe for our canine companions! Here, your veterinarian Frisco, TX tells you all about the dangers of marijuana for dogs.

Can Dogs Get High?

Yes, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana—tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC—affects dogs in a similar way to that of humans. However, it’s important to realize that dogs are much smaller than humans, so small amounts of THC have a much greater effect. Plus, dogs don’t realize what they’re ingesting and won’t be prepared for the effects the way a human is.

What are the Symptoms of Poisoning?

A dog that is exposed to THC may experience incontinence, hypersensitivity to touch and sound, and loss of coordination. “Edibles,” or foods that are made with marijuana as an ingredient, are also dangerous because a dog may ingest a lot of butter, sugar, or fat, which can prove hazardous.

What if My Dog Ingests Marijuana?

Take your dog to the emergency room if they’ve ingested marijuana. Supportive fluids may be given, or vomiting may be induced.

Call your vet clinic Frisco, TX to learn more.

Senior Cat Care Basics

Do you have a senior cat in your household? Our feline friends are considered “seniors” by the time they’re about seven or eight. Here are a few quick tips from a veterinarian Brandon, FL for keeping your older cat in good health.

A Great Diet

Your cat’s nutritional requirements have changed quite a bit since she was a kitten. It’s important that your cat is fed a diet made just for the needs of older felines! Ask your vet to recommend a senior formula that suits your cat’s needs, because nutrition is the foundation for great health.

Special Accommodations

Try placing a litter box on each floor of your home so that your cat doesn’t have to trek up and down the staircase to use the bathroom. Make sure litter boxes have low sides so your cat doesn’t struggle to get in. Last but not least, place plenty of soft beds around the home to give your cat plenty of napping spots.

Veterinary Checkups

When your vet checks up on your cat regularly, trouble can be spotted early and treated accordingly. It’s the best way to keep your cat healthy!

Schedule your cat’s appointment at your vet clinic Brandon, FL.

Sphynx Cat Basics

You’ll know a sphynx cat when you see one—their hairless body, bat-like ears, and wide eyes are unmistakable! Read on as your veterinarian Ellicott City, MD tells you more about these fascinating felines.

The Sphynx’s History

Records of hairless cats in North America date back to the early 1900s, but the Sphynx cat that we recognize today originates in 1966. That year in Toronto, Canada, a pair of domestic shorthair cats produced a hairless litter thanks to a random genetic mutation. The hairless cats continued to breed and have been spreading ever since!

Care Needs

For the most part, a Sphynx’s care needs are similar to those of other cats. They will need extra bathing, though, because body oil that would usually be removed by fur tends to build upon the skin. The Sphynx cat can also be sunburned easily, so exposure to direct sunlight must be limited.

Personality of the Sphynx

Sphynxes are friendly, intelligent, and curious cats, and they have high metabolic rates; this means they’re high-energy and will typically love jumping, running, and climbing. All in all, they make wonderful pets!

Learn more about the Sphynx cat by calling your pet clinic Ellicott City MD.

Antioxidants and How They Help Your Cat

You’ve probably heard of antioxidants before—they’re extremely helpful for humans, and are included in many foods. Did you know that antioxidants are also beneficial for your cat? Learn more here from a vet Rochester, NY.

Food Freshness

Antioxidants do what their name suggests: battle oxidation, which occurs when your cat’s food is exposed to oxygen. This process breaks down the nutrients in food over time, eventually spoiling it. Antioxidants slow the oxidation process to keep your feline friend’s food fresh!

Immune System Benefits

Free radicals occur naturally in your cat’s body and are produced in greater numbers when your pet gets sick or is exposed to toxins. Free radicals contain oxygen, so antioxidants are effective for keeping them at bay. In this way, antioxidants are essential for good immune system health.

Anti-Aging Properties

Studies have demonstrated that antioxidants are also effective for combatting the effects of aging in your pet’s brain. They literally keep the brain functioning at a higher level as your pet ages—that’s why antioxidants are often included in senior cat food formulas.

Learn more about your cat’s diet, nutrition, and care needs by calling your veterinary clinic Rochester, NY today. We’re always here to help!