Probiotics for Your Pet

Probiotics are rather common in the world of human healthcare. Did you know that they’re also available for pets? Probiotics can benefit your pet in a variety of ways. Learn more here from a Marietta, GA veterinarian.

What Are Probiotics, Anyway?

Probiotics are beneficial microbes that live in your pet’s small or large intestine. They keep “bad” microbes at bay and help to digest food, manufacture vitamins, and other nutrients, and get rid of harmful pathogens. Probiotics for pets might come in the form of a tablet or capsule or yogurt or kefir. It could also be included in pet food.

What Can Probiotics Do for My Pet?

Probiotics help maintain the proper intestinal microbial balance, so they can be prescribed to help with many kinds of digestive health issues. They can be given to manage or correct infestations or infections, regulate digestion, and even to help lower stress levels.

Does My Pet Need Probiotics?

To be safe, only give your pet a probiotic if it’s been cleared by your veterinarian. That way, you’ll be sure it’s completely safe for your beloved companion.

To learn more about your pet’s nutrition and diet, contact your animal hospital Marietta, GA today.

Chocolate Toxicity and Your Pet

You’re probably aware that chocolate and pets don’t mix. In fact, it’s one of the most dangerous toxins out there for our animal friends! Learn more about chocolate toxicity in dogs and cats as your Ashburn, VA veterinarian fills you in below:

Symptoms

The symptoms of chocolate toxicity include drooling, lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and—without prompt treatment—seizures, coma, and even death. Caffeine and theobromine are the ingredients in chocolate that don’t agree with our pets, and they’re found in all types: dark, semi-sweet, milk, white, powdered, etc.

Treatment

If you know or suspect that your pet has ingested chocolate, rush them to the vet’s office. The stomach may need to be flushed, or activated charcoal may be given to slow the toxin’s absorption in the stomach. As a pet recovers, fluid replacement, oxygen supplementation, and other methods might be needed to stabilize them fully.

Preventing Poisoning

Clearly, it’s worth preventing poisoning before it happens. That means keeping any and all chocolate and sweet treats out of your pet’s reach. Store these items in closed cabinets, containers, or the refrigerator so pets can’t gain access at any time.

Contact your animal hospital Ashburn, VA for more information on chocolate toxicity.

Brushing Fido’s Pearly Whites

Have you looked at your dog’s teeth lately? Dental health is very important for our canine companions because bad oral health can lead to a whole host of other problems. Here, let your Columbia, MD vet tell you how to brush your dog’s pearly whites.

Get Your Supplies

First, gather your supplies in a quiet, well-lit area of your home where you’ll perform Fido’s tooth brushing. You’ll need a pet toothbrush, a canine-formulated toothpaste, and a few tasty dog treats. Now, you’re ready to begin.

Brush

Allow Fido to smell and taste the toothpaste before dabbing a bit on the brush. Peel back your dog’s upper lip to expose the teeth, and begin brushing one section of the mouth. Only focus on the outer tooth surfaces; that’s where plaque tends to accumulate. Finish off the section with one final downward stroke of the brush.

Repeat and Reward

Now, continue around to all sections of your dog’s mouth with the brushing. Try giving your dog a tasty treat after each one so that he remains engaged in the brushing process.

Need help with your dog’s dental care? Want a recommendation on a good dog toothpaste? Call your veterinary clinic Columbia, MD.

Your Dog and Pink Eye

You’ve probably heard of pink eye; it’s relatively common in the human healthcare world. Pink eye can also affect dogs! Learn more below from your London, ON vet.

What Causes Pink Eye?

Pink eye, known medically as conjunctivitis, involves inflammation of the conjunctiva or the tissues around your dog’s eyes. It can occur entirely on its own (primary conjunctivitis), or secondarily to another disease or health issue (secondary conjunctivitis). Common causes include bacterial or viral infections, foreign bodies in the eye, glaucoma, eye trauma, and allergies.

What are the Signs?

The main sign of pink eye is a red and inflamed eye or eyelids. Other symptoms include excessive blinking, pawing at the yes, increased tear production, and eye discharge. Conjunctivitis most often occurs in both eyes simultaneously, although it can affect only one eye at a time.

How Is Pink Eye Treated?

First, your vet will perform a full eye exam. Next, the pink eye will need to be treated depending on what’s causing the issue at its root. In most cases, anti-inflammatory medication can be given to lessen the swelling and redness.

Does your dog need a veterinary exam? We’re here to help. Contact your vet clinic London, ON.

Three Benefits of Pet Microchip Identification

Have you ever considered outfitting your pet with a microchip? It’s the best way to keep your animal friend properly identified throughout life. Learn more about the benefits of microchips from your Murrieta, CA veterinarian:

It’s Cost-Effective

You only have to purchase one microchip for the entirety of your pet’s life, and they aren’t expensive. Even if you move addresses or get a new telephone number, your pet’s contact information can be updated by contacting the microchip manufacturer. Your pet keeps the same chip the whole time!

It’s Secure

Your pet can’t remove their identification when it’s embedded under their skin. That gives you incredible peace of mind. Even if your pet escapes unexpectedly, you know that they remain constantly identified no matter what.

It’s Quick and Painless

The microchip implant procedure only takes a few moments. All your pet feels is a momentary pinch before the whole thing is over. The microchip unit is inserted under your pet’s skin with a specialized hypodermic needle-like device, and it’s virtually risk- and side-effect-free.

Want to learn more about microchips for pets? Contact your animal hospital Murrieta, CA right away. We’re here to help with all of your pet’s care needs!

Pet Vaccination 101

Vaccinating your pet early on in life is one of the best things you’ll ever do for their health and happiness. Preventing dangerous diseases ahead of time is far easier than treating them! Learn about the basics of pet vaccination below from your Savannah, GA veterinarian.

Core Vaccines

All pets need what are called the core vaccines, considered essential for all pets because the diseases they prevent are particularly dangerous and/or contagious. Some examples include the vaccines for distemper, feline leukemia, parvovirus, rabies, Lyme disease, and hepatitis.

Non-Core Vaccines

Non-core vaccines aren’t considered necessary for every pet, but they can help some. They’re administered on a case-by-case basis depending on factors like location, environment, pre-existing health conditions, age, etc. The Bordetella vaccine is one example; it protects against kennel cough, so a pet who will be boarded commonly may benefit from the vaccination.

Vaccination Scheduling

Most vaccines will need booster shots every year or every few years to remain effective. Many pet owners have their companion’s vaccinations updated as necessary at one of their pet’s annual appointments. Talk to your veterinarian for more information on your pet’s vaccination schedule.

Contact your veterinary clinic Savannah, GA to have your pet vaccinated.

Your Cat’s Hairball Basics

If you own a cat, it’s a safe bet that you deal with the occasional hairball. It’s a part of life for most of our feline friends! How much do you know about your cat’s hairballs, though? Are they dangerous? Find out more here from a Westminster, MD vet.

Why Do Hairballs Form?

When your cat licks herself for grooming, the tongue picks up a lot of loose fur, which your cat swallows. Most of this ingested hair moves through the digestive system and gets expelled in your cat’s fecal matter, but some of it remains in the gut. That hair clumps together in the form of a hairball, which will eventually be regurgitated.

Are Hairballs Safe?

Yes, the occasional hairball is perfectly normal and safe. If your cat is coughing up hairballs frequently, though, see the vet; something could be causing her to shed too much. Also, any cat who is vomiting frequently should be examined by a vet promptly.

How Can I Lessen Hairball Production?

Feed your cat a great diet to minimize shedding, and brush her regularly to remove loose fur. Your feline friend will thank you!

Learn more about hairballs by calling your veterinarian Westminster, MD.

Is Your Dog Shedding Excessively?

Almost all of our canine companions shed their fur. It’s a natural part of life for dogs, but sometimes it can become excessive. If you’re finding buckets of fur around your home, it’s time to address the issue. Learn more here from a vet Washington, DC.

Brush the Coat

One thing you can do daily to help control your dog’s excess shedding is to brush his fur. Running a brush or comb through the coat traps loose hair in the implement itself, preventing it from winding up all over your carpets, furniture, and clothing.

Improve the Diet

Your dog’s diet is directly related to his coat quality. When Fido receives the proper nutrition through his food, the skin and hair stays healthy. When your dog is eating a poor diet, on the other hand, the coat becomes dry, coarse, and dull. Upgrade your dog’s diet and see an almost immediate decrease in shedding!

See Your Vet

Still can’t reign in your dog’s excessive shedding? It’s time to see the vet. Medical issues like parasitic infestation, skin infection, and much more could be the root cause!

Contact your veterinary clinic Washington, DC today to set up your dog’s next office visit.

Pet Toxins You Have in Your Home

That’s right—you have a few pet toxins in your home already, no matter how conscientious you are about pet safety. When you’re aware of the hazards, you can keep your animal companion safe! Here, your veterinarian London, ON tells you more.

Toxic Foods

All sorts of human foods are dangerous for pets. The list includes chocolate and candy, garlic, onions, chives, leeks, scallions, shallots, grapes and raisins, salty foods, rich or buttery foods, and alcohol, among others. Keep your pet away!

Cleaning Supplies

It’s safe to say that almost any cleaning product shouldn’t be ingested by your pet. Everything from carpet cleaner and furniture polish to household disinfectants and bleach can cause serious harm. Keep cleaning supplies safely locked away in the supply closet where pets can’t reach.

Plants and Flowers

There are plenty of plants and flowers that are toxic to pets, including Amaryllis, dieffenbachia, elephant ear, ivy, oleander, rhododendron (also called azalea), philodendron, the sago palm, lilies, daffodils, tulips, and more. Check your home for common offenders, and remove them so that your pet can’t gain access.

To learn more about pet toxins already in your home, contact your vet London, ON. We’re always here to help!

Understanding Pet Antibiotics

Did you know that antibiotics are very commonly used in veterinary medicine as well as in human healthcare? Below, your vet Roanoke, VA tells you more about antibiotics for our animal friends.

What Do Antibiotics Do for My Pet?

Antibiotics kill bacteria that is in or on your pet’s body. They work by weakening bacteria, interfering with bacteria cells’ ability to repair themselves, or stopping the bacteria from multiplying. Antibiotics do not treat viruses, so an antibiotic wouldn’t be prescribed to a pet suffering from a viral infection unless a secondary bacterial infection has developed.

How Are Antibiotics Given to Pets?

Some antibiotics come in pill or tablet form, while some are given in topical form and get applied directly to your pet’s skin in the form of a gel or ointment. Certain antibiotics must be given with food to improve absorption rates, while others must be given on an empty stomach.

Is There Any Risk of Side Effects?

There is a chance that some pets could experience symptoms like vomiting or diarrhea. Let your vet know right away if your pet doesn’t seem to be responding well to an antibiotic.

Learn more by contacting your veterinary clinic Roanoke, VA.