The ABCs of Catnip

You’ve probably heard of catnip. It’s entirely likely that you’ve tried it out on your feline friend. But what do you know about your cat’s favorite indulgence? Learn more here from a veterinarian Murrieta, CA.

What Exactly is Catnip?

Catnip is an herb, related closely to mint, basil, and other common herbs. You can purchase “raw” catnips, which is a dried and processed version of the wild plant, or toys or spray products that have catnip infused into them.

Why Does Catnips Affect Cats?

Catnip contains a chemical called nepetalactone, and it causes a reaction in your cat’s brain. Some experts liken it to a kind of sexual response since the part of the brain that’s triggered is the same one responsible for sexual urges. It’s a kind of feline aphrodisiac!

Is Catnips Safe?

Yes, catnip is perfectly safe. The chemical reaction in the brain isn’t harmful whatsoever, and your cat can’t overdose or become addicted. And some cats don’t respond at all—they need a particular gene to feel the effects of the herb, and only about half of all cats possess it.

Want more information on catnips and your feline friend’s behavior? Contact your animal hospital Murrieta, CA.

Probiotic Supplements and Your Pet

You’ve probably heard of probiotics, as they’re very helpful in the world of human health and medicine. You might have even taken one yourself. But can pets have probiotic supplements? Learn more here from a veterinarian New Orleans, LA.

What Are Probiotics?

A probiotic is a beneficial microbe that’s found in your pet’s small or large intestine. They help to keep the “bad” microbes at bay in these areas and are helpful for digesting food, destroying pathogens, and manufacturing vitamins and other nutrients.

What Can Probiotics Do for Pets?

Your pet might use a probiotic to regulate digestive health, help treat infections or infestations, or even to minimize stress. Most often, probiotics are prescribed when your pet needs help dealing with some kind of digestive issue. The probiotic itself might come in a tablet or capsule form, or in a yogurt or kefir product.

Should I Give My Pet a Probiotic?

Check with your veterinarian to find out if your pet would benefit from a probiotic before deciding to give them one. That way, you know for sure that it’s completely safe!

To learn more about your pet’s digestive health and nutrition, call your vet clinic New Orleans, LA today.

How to Combat Pet Odors at Home

Let’s face it—sometimes, our homes can start to smell a little bit too much like our pets. Pets just have a natural odor, and that can transfer into your carpets and furniture! Luckily, something can be done; learn more from a vet Washington DC.

Grooming

Groom your pet on a daily basis, because it will do wonders for odors. Brushing regularly removes grime from the coat and keeps fur from falling all over your home. The occasional bath—using a canine- or feline-formulated shampoo—will keep your companion smelling great for weeks to come.

Odor Neutralizers

Air fresheners just mask over smells, letting them return over time. An odor neutralizer, though, destroys enzymes that cause odors in the first place. There are products to combat stains and odors from vomit, feces, urine, and more! Browse the selection at your local pet store.

See the Vet

Does your pet smell particularly strong, or has an odor seemingly come out of nowhere? Schedule an office appointment to have your pet examined. Various health issues—skin infection, parasites, rotting teeth, and more—could be the root cause of the smell!

Contact your vet clinic Washington DC to learn more about pet odors.

Pica in Dogs: What to Do When Your Dog Eats Foreign Objects

Pica means the craving and ingestion of non-food items by your dog. Those items could be almost anything—batteries, fabric, coins, dirt, rocks, and socks, for example! Obviously, this condition can prove very dangerous. Learn more here from a Westminster, MD vet.

Why Does Pica Occur?

A cause isn’t found in every case of pica. When it is, though, it’s generally thought of as either medical or behavioral. Medical pica means that a nutritional deficiency, diabetes, thyroid problem, or some other medical issue is causing your dog to ingest foreign bodies. In a behavioral case, an issue like anxiety is the root cause.

How is it Treated?

A medical case of pica must be dealt with by treating the underlying medical issue. In behavioral cases, it’s not so cut and dry—you might have to remove stressors at home, or hire a professional dog behaviorist, for example, to get to the root of the problem.

What Do I Do if My Dog Eats a Foreign Object?

If you know or suspect that your dog has eaten a foreign object, rush them to the vet’s office. Better safe than sorry!

Call your vets Westminster, MD to learn more about pica.

Myths About Your Cat

Don’t believe everything you hear about your feline friend! There are many myths and misconceptions about our cats, and they’re simply untrue. Allow your Newmarket, ON veterinarian to set the record straight:

Cats Always Land Upright

This isn’t true. Cats can slip and fall like anyone else, even though they’re often graceful and poised. Veterinarians even have a term referencing cats falling off of high ledges or windowsills: high-rise syndrome. Check all window screens in your home, and don’t let your cat relax on high ledges!

Cats Love Milk

This is a half-truth. Cats might love milk, but it won’t return the service. The truth is that most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning that they can’t digest milk properly. Too much will probably result in vomiting or diarrhea!

Cats Purr When Happy

This is also only half true. Cats do often purr when they’re feeling happy and content, yes. But many experts believe that purring can also indicate a variety of other emotions, such as anger, stress, or fear! You know your cat best, so pay attention to her mannerisms to know what she’s thinking.

Need to make an office appointment for your pet? Contact your veterinarians Newmarket, ON.

Can My Cat Eat Avocado?

Avocado usually appears on lists of foods that aren’t good for pets. It’s true—avocado and guacamole aren’t always safe for pets, but it turns out that they can offer some nutritional value. Let’s take a closer look at the issue as your Rochester, NY tells you more.

Avocado’s Benefits

The fruit of the avocado can provide nutrients to your cats, like vitamins A, E, C, B3 and B6, fiber, magnesium, and potassium. But is avocado worth the risk to get these nutrients? No, because your cat should be getting these nutrients from their regular food!

Avocado’s Risks

The stem, leaves, skin, pit, and fruit of the avocado contain a toxin called persin. It’s because of this poison that avocado is generally considered a bad idea for pets, your cat included. It would take a lot of avocado or guacamole to actually cause problems to your cat, but it’s really not worth the risk!

Can Cats Eat Avocado?

At the end of the day, it’s not worth the risk to feed your cat avocado. Plus, it’s doubtful that your feline friend would decide to eat it anyway!

Call your pet clinic Rochester, NY today for more information on toxic foods.

Can Dogs Eat Avocado?

Avocado frequently appears on lists of dangerous human foods for dogs. And it’s true—avocado isn’t always safe for our canine friends, although it can, in fact, offer some health benefits. Allow your Aurora, CO vet to set the record straight below:

Avocado’s Benefits

The fleshy fruit of the avocado can provide some nutrients to your dog, just like it can to you. Those nutrients include vitamins A, B3 and B6, C, and E, as well as potassium, magnesium, amino acids, antioxidants, folate, and fiber.

The Drawbacks of Avocado

Every part of the avocado plant—including the fruit—contains a level of persin, a toxic agent that can harm dogs. It would take a lot of avocados to actually cause poisoning, though. The bigger danger is the avocado’s pit or seed, which a dog can easily choke on.

Can Dogs Eat Avocado?

Technically, dogs can eat the fruit of the avocado without experiencing harm. But they don’t need avocado as a part of the diet assuming they’re getting the right nutrients from their normal dog food! Overall, feeding your dog avocado isn’t worth the risk.

Want to learn more about your dog’s diet and nutrition? Contact your veterinarian Aurora, CO.

Probiotics for Pets: Does Your Pet Need One?

You may have heard of probiotics before, as they’re relatively common in human healthcare. You might have even tried a probiotic yourself. Were you aware that pets can also benefit from probiotics? Learn more below from a Savannah, GA vet.

What Are Probiotic, Anyway?

Probiotics are beneficial microbes that live in your pet’s intestinal tract. They keep “bad” microbes from affecting your pet’s health; probiotics help to digest food, manufacture vitamins, and other nutrients and destroy pathogens in the system. Probiotics made for pets might be included in pet food, or it may come in a tablet form or in a yogurt or kefir product.

What Does Probiotic Do for Pets?

Probiotics are often prescribed to help with health issues involving digestive problems since they help to regulate intestinal microbial balance. A probiotic may be prescribed to regulate digestion, minimize stress, or manage or correct infections and infestations.

Does My Pet Need to Take a Probiotic?

As a rule of thumb, check with your veterinarian before giving a probiotic supplement to your pet. That way, you know for sure that it’s safe!

To learn more about probiotics for your pet, contact your veterinarians Savannah, GA. We’re here for you!

Lily Toxicity and Your Feline Friend

Lilies are very common flowers, and you might even have them in your home right now. Did you know that lilies are very toxic to cats? Learn more here from a Glendale, AZ veterinarian.

Symptoms of Poisoning

Some lilies only cause minor mouth irritation, while some cause more serious symptoms like loss of appetite, lethargy, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, and—without treatment—seizures and even death. The Easter, tiger, Japanese snow, day, wood, and Stargazer lilies are some of the most common offenders.

Treating Poisoning

A cat who has eaten a lily flower should be taken to the emergency room. Activated charcoal may be given to slow the toxin’s absorption in the gut, or the stomach may be flushed. Fluid replacement therapy, oxygen supplementation, and other supportive measures might be needed as the patient recovers.

Preventing Toxicity 

Prevent lily Toxicity in the first place, rather than dealing with it after the fact. Lilies are common in bouquets and floral arrangements, and can also be planted in landscaping areas—check these areas to make sure you’re not keeping a harmful plant within reach of your cat.

Ready to learn more about lily Toxicity in cats? Contact your animal hospital Glendale, AZ today.

Dental Care for Fido

When was the last time you took a look at your dog’s teeth? Dental care is extremely important for dogs because dental disease is very common––and very dangerous. Use these tips from your Burlington, ON veterinarian to make sure Fido’s pearly whites stay in great shape: 

Brush the Teeth

Brush your dog’s teeth on a regular basis using a canine-formulated toothpaste and a pet toothbrush. Start by simply massaging your dog’s gums with your finger; gross, we know, but it gets your dog used to the brushing sensation. Then, slowly introduce the paste and brush. Work your way around your dog’s whole mouth, then offer a treat for a job well-done. 

Proper Diet and Fresh Water

Feeding your dog the right diet means he’s getting the right nutrients for gum and tooth health. Fresh water helps to flush out the mouth and get rid of leftover food particles, bacteria, and other grime. 

Chew Toys

Chew toys provide hours of fun, but they also help to scrape away some of the loose plaque on Fido’s teeth. That’s a great way to remove it before it hardens into tartar. 

Learn more by calling your animal hospital Burlington, ON. We’re here to help!