Stop Your Cat From Scratching the Furniture

Our feline friends love to scratch—it’s simply in their nature! Unfortunately, our furniture and other belongings sometimes find themselves at the wrong end of Fluffy’s claws. Use these tips from your Thousand Oaks, CA vet to stop your cat’s scratching behavior:

Training

Every time you see your cat scratch, clap your hands sharply and say “no!” in a firm voice. Your cat will get the hint over time; scratching is bad, and her owners don’t like it.

Scratching Post

Every time that you stop your cat from scratching something, direct them to a nearby scratching post. It may be helpful to have several of these items set up around your home. They give your cat a safe outlet to scratch on while saving your furniture, so head to the local pet supply store or retail outlet to pick one up.

Deterrents

Another option is deterrents. Taste deterrents are sprayed onto furniture to ward off pets, while noise deterrents blare a loud noise every time your cat gets close. Products like these can be useful to stop your cat from scratching, but ask your Vet Clinic Thousand Oaks, CA how to use them safely so as not to terrorize your pet.

Preventative Healthcare Essentials for Cats and Dogs

Preventative medicine is the best medicine—not only is it more effective than treating an illness or infection, it’s cheaper! Here, your Fort Collins, CO vet tells you about three essential preventative measures for your dog or cat.

Vaccination

Make sure your pet has received the core vaccination batch against diseases like parvovirus, distemper, feline leukemia (FeLV), parainfluenza, hepatitis, and rabies. These are essential for keeping your pet in good health for a lifetime. If your pet hasn’t received vaccinations, contact your vet right away to make an appointment.

Pest Control

Your pet ought to be wearing year-round or seasonal preventative medications against fleas, ticks, mosquitoes, and worms like heartworm and roundworm. It’s much easier to prevent the infestations these creatures cause rather than deal with them after the fact. Ask your veterinarian to prescribe preventative medications for your cat or dog’s needs.

Veterinary Appointments

It’s certainly not your cat or dog’s favorite preventative healthcare measure, but regular veterinary appointments are essential for good health. Your veterinarian can catch any health problems early and treat them before they can develop into serious problems. Set up an appointment with your vet Fort Collins, CO animal clinic today to have your pet examined.

 

Swimming Safety Tips for Dogs

Does your dog enjoy swimming? It sure is a lot of fun to swim with your canine companion! Use these tips from a vet in Greensboro, NC to make sure Fido stays safe:

Support Your Dog

Even if your dog is an experienced swimmer, it’s a good idea to go into the water with your pooch to provide support. This is especially important if you’re swimming in the ocean; even dogs who are strong swimmers may be caught off guard by ocean currents or tides.

Provide Fresh Water

Whether you’re swimming at the shore, in a public lake, or in the backyard pool, it’s imperative that you don’t let your dog drink the water. Salt water, bacteria, and chlorine can all harm your dog, dry out the mouth, and irritate the skin. Bring along a thermos of cool, fresh water for your dog to drink from regularly.

Rinse Out the Coat

Salt water and chlorine can also irritate your dog’s skin and dry out the fur. Rinse your dog’s hair out thoroughly with fresh water from the hose after swimming time is over.

Would you like more swimming safety tips for dogs? Contact your animal hospital Greensboro, NC professional for help.

Keeping Your Pet Safe in the Garden

Do you enjoy gardening with your pet? Just make sure they stay safe from harm! Learn how to do just that from a North Phoenix, AZ veterinary professional.

Poisonous Plant Life

Plenty of garden plants and flowers can cause toxic reactions in our animal friends. The list includes the sago palm, various aloe plants, lilies, tulips, daffodils, chrysanthemum, azalea, ivy, oleander, dieffenbachia, poinsettia plants, elephant ear, and many more. Ask your vet what sort of toxic plant life is common in your area.

Pesticides, Fertilizer

Spraying chemicals on your lawn or garden is never a good idea when pets are outdoors. Pesticides and fertilizers can poison a pet who manages to ingest them. Also make sure that your pet doesn’t decide to munch on a tuft of recently treated grass or a freshly sprayed garden plant.

Outdoor Parasites

Your pet should be wearing seasonal or year-round preventative medications to protect against fleas, ticks, mosquitoes, and parasitic worms like heartworm and roundworm. It’s far easier to prevent the infections and infestations that these critters cause rather than deal with them after the fact.

Want more gardening safety tips for your pet’s health? Contact your veterinarian North Phoenix, AZ for help.

Xylitol Toxicity in House Pets

Xylitol, an artificial sugar substitute found in many candies and gums, is one of the most dangerous pet toxins out there. Here, your Myakka, FL vet tells you about the symptoms of and treatment for poisoning, as well as how to prevent episodes.

Symptoms

A pet who has ingested a xylitol product will usually exhibit symptoms within 30 minutes, although this can vary depending on the amount ingested and the size of your pet. Common symptoms include weakness, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, and uncoordinated movements. Without treatment, a pet may experience seizures, coma, and even death.

Treatment

Rush your pet to the local veterinary emergency room if you see or suspect that they’ve eaten a product made with xylitol. The stomach may be flushed, or activated charcoal may be administered to rid the system of the toxic agent. Supportive measures like fluid therapy, oxygen supplementation, and more may be needed.

Prevention

Check the candies, gums, and baked goods that you buy to see if they contain xylitol. To be safe, never leave any such product where a pet may be able to swipe it down and ingest it.

Your Vet Myakka, FL can give you more information—call the office today!