Trimming Fido’s Nails

Regular nail trims are an essential part of your canine companion’s grooming routine. After all, when nails grow too long and sharp, they may get caught in carpets or fracture painfully. Below, your Greenville, SC veterinarian tells you how to successfully clip your dog’s nails.

What You’ll Need

Gather your supplies before beginning. You’ll need a set of canine-specific nail trimmers—never use clippers designed for humans or another type of animal—as well as a styptic powder or pen to staunch bleeding. Also keep a few dog treats on hand.

Clip the Tips

Choose a time when your dog is calm, and sit down with them in a quiet, well-lit area. Gently extend the first claw, and snip the tip with the clippers. Don’t clip too far down, or you’ll snip the blood vessel running into each nail and cause bleeding. If this does occur, use your styptic pen or powder until the bleeding stops.

Repeat and Reward

Go around to each nail until they’ve all been clipped successfully. Be sure to reward your dog after each paw is completed for a job well-done.

Want help trimming your dog’s nails? Contact your Animal Hospital in Greenville, SC for professional help.

How to Trim Your Dog’s Nails

Nail trims are an important part of your dog’s grooming regimen—if a pup’s nails get too long and sharp, they can fracture painfully or get snagged in carpets and other materials. To clip your dog’s nails safely, follow these tips from an Aurora, CO vet:

Gather Supplies

Before starting, gather together everything you’ll need. Purchase a canine-specific set of clippers, and keep a styptic powder or pen on hand to staunch bleeding. You’ll also want a few dog treats.

Clip the Tips

Sit down with your pooch in a quiet, well-lit area of the house. Gently extend one of your dog’s claws and snip just the tip with the clippers. Remember: you’re only trying to blunt the tip, not cut off a large portion. If you clip too far, bleeding will result; this is where your styptic powder comes in handy if you need it.

Reward

Work around to all of your dog’s claws, and take your time. You can even take long breaks in between paws if necessary. Always reward your dog with a treat after trimming is done.

If you’d like professional help trimming your dog’s claws, we’re here for you. Call your Veterinary Clinic Aurora, CO!

What to Do If Your Pet Needs to Lose Weight

You’ve just realized your pet is carrying too much weight—what now? It’s very important to get your pet back to a healthy weight as soon as possible. Here, your Livonia, MI veterinarian tells you what steps to take next.

See the Vet

First things first: make an appointment to see your vet. Working together, you’ll come up with a tailored weight loss plan for your pet that will allow him or her to shed pounds in a healthy manner.

Use Portion Control

Portion control is likely to be a part of your pet’s weight-loss program. Never free-feed (this is the practice of leaving food out at all times for a pet to eat as they please). Instead, use measured portions and take food away after about 20 minutes, even uneaten portions.

Diet and Exercise Tips

It may be necessary to switch your pet’s diet entirely; ask your veterinarian for a recommendation on a high-quality, nutritionally balanced food for your dog or cat. Exercise, of course, will also be essential—get your pet moving on a daily basis.

Want more help getting your pet to lose weight? Call your Pet Clinic Livonia, MI today to speak with a veterinary professional.

Keeping Pets Safe in the Kitchen

The kitchen is undoubtedly one of the most dangerous areas of your home for a pet. Of course, you probably spend a lot of time there! Use these tips from an Indianapolis, IN vet to make sure your four-legged friend stays safe.

Toxic Foods

There are plenty of harmful human foods that pets shouldn’t have. The list includes garlic, onions, chives, grapes, raisins, chocolate, candy, gum, alcohol, caffeine, bones, salty items, fatty foods, and more. Never leave any dangerous foods within your pet’s reach—store them in cabinets or the refrigerator instead.

Sharp Objects

Knives, soup can lids, graters, forks, pizza cutters… the list of sharp objects in your kitchen goes on and on. It’s all too easy for a pet to get injured if they hang around underfoot while you’re using these items, so keep your pet out of the kitchen when cooking.

Hot Surfaces

Many hot surfaces—stovetops, the oven, boiling pots of water, toasters, coffeepots—present a burn hazard to your animal companion. Don’t let pets gain access to countertops where they may burn themselves.

Would you like more tips on keeping your pet safe at home? We’re here to help! Call your veterinarian Indianapolis, IN today.

The Advantages of Adopting Older Pets

If you’re thinking of adopting a pet in the near future, you may want to consider an older animal. For many prospective pet owners, this is a much better idea than a puppy or kitten! Learn more below from a Lafayette, LA vet.

Energy Level

Not looking to keep up after a rambunctious, energy-filled young pet? An older animal is your answer. Older pets just don’t have the energy that young pets do, and they’ll likely be content to relax for most of the day. A daily walk or play session is all they’ll need to remain happy!

Manners

Older pets have passed the chew-it-up, scratch-everything-in-sight phase of life. They’re also not likely to have accidents in the house and may already know how to ask to go outdoors or use a litter box. All pets need looking after, but an older pet isn’t as daunting of a responsibility!

Training

If an older pet has already lived with a family before yours, it’s possible they already are trained or know commands. This can be very useful for a smooth transition into a new home.

Do you have questions about caring for a senior pet? Call your Veterinarians Lafayette, LA.