Selecting a Leash for Your Dog

Have you recently adopted a dog? A leash is one essential that you can’t go without! The question is, how do you know what kind of leash to purchase? Your vet Marietta, GA elaborates below:

The Standard Leash

The vast majority of dogs will do just fine with a standard leash. These are typically about six feet long and are most often made of nylon. They may also be made of leather or another material. The standard leash has a loop at one end and a clasping mechanism at the other, which attaches to your dog’s collar.

Retractable Leashes

Retractable leashes have a spring mechanism that allows your dog to roam away from you until the leash runs out. They’re a great way to give your dog a little freedom on the leash, but use caution: it’s easy for dogs to dart away before you can gain control of them.

Training Leashes

Training leashes may be made of special materials or might be extra long or short. Unless directed to use one by a veterinary professional or animal trainer, it’s not necessary to select one for your canine companion.

For more information on dog leashes, contact your veterinarians Marietta, GA.

Your Pet’s Emergency Kit

The only sensible way to deal with an emergency situation is to be prepared ahead of time. When it comes to your pet, an emergency kit can help you do that! Learn what to include in your pet’s kit from a veterinary clinic Colorado Springs, CO.

First-Aid Basics

Assemble or purchase a first-aid kit for your pet. Items to pack include bandages, gauze, a pet-safe disinfectant, tweezers, a set of nail clippers, styptic powder or a styptic pen to staunch bleeding, soft towels, a pet thermometer, and a few pairs of latex gloves to protect your hands.

Pet Meds

Does your pet take medications to treat or manage a condition? It’s always a good idea to pack a supply in your pet’s emergency kit so that you always know where it is. Check the expatriation dates frequently to make sure your pet’s medications don’t need to be replaced.

Medical Records

Medical records—documentation of recent medical work, proof of ownership and vaccinations, etc.—can be lifesavers in an emergency situation, especially if you find yourself at an unfamiliar vet’s office or shelter. Pack these documents in a waterproof bag.

Want help assembling your pet’s emergency care kit? Call your pet clinic Colorado Springs, CO.

Getting Your Dog Used to Car Rides

Many of our canine companions don’t take kindly to the car. Of course, since car rides are going to be a part of life for most dogs, it’s important to get your pooch acclimated! Use these tips from a vet Savannah, GA to do just that:

In the Driveway

Before going on any trips with your dog, simply let him explore the vehicle while it’s sitting in the driveway, turned off. This way, he gets used to the sights and smells of the car. You can entice your pooch with toys or treats to help him associate positive feelings with the car as well!

Practice Runs

Once your dog is more comfortable in the car, go on short drives around the neighborhood, or perhaps to a local park. This will get Fido used to the sensation of moving, and he’ll realize that not all car rides result in an anxiety-inducing trip to the vet’s office.

During Your Ride

It’s always best to keep your dog secured in his crate for car rides, as he’ll be safest there. Try cracking a window or playing music at a low volume to soothe Fido.

For more car-ride tips, call your veterinarian Savannah, GA.

The Basics of Pet Vaccination

Vaccination is, of course, a key part of your pet’s health. If you’ve recently adopted a cat or dog, getting them the proper vaccines is an essential step in the right direction! Here, your vet Indianapolis, IN goes over the basics of vaccines for pets.

Core Vaccines

All dogs and cats need what are known as the core vaccines. Some examples of these include vaccines against distemper, parvovirus, influenza, and rabies—they’re given because of the dangerous and/or contagious nature of the diseases they protect against. Often, core vaccines are administered together in a batch when your pet is young.

Non-Core Vaccines

As the name suggests, non-core vaccines aren’t necessary for all pets. They might help some cats and dogs, though, based on factors like risk of exposure to a certain disease, environment, pre-existing conditions, and others. Ask your vet what non-core vaccines your pet might need.

Booster Shots

Many vaccinations need booster shots every year or every few years to remain effective. Talk to your vet for further details on your pet’s booster-shot schedule.

Does your pet need to be vaccinated? Do you have more questions about the vaccination regimen? Set up an appointment today at your pet clinic Indianapolis, IN.