How to Cut Down Your Cat’s Hairball Production

Since cats ingest a bit of hair every time that they groom themselves, some hairballs are a natural part of life for our feline friends. There are a few ways you can cut down on the amount of hairballs your pet produces, though! Learn more here from a Glendale, AZ veterinarian.

Grooming

By running a brush through your cat’s coat on a daily basis, you’re trapping a lot of the loose and dead hair from her coat in the brush itself. This prevents her from ingesting it, ultimately reducing hairball production. Ask your vet to recommend a good brush type for your cat’s fur.

Diet Changes

If your cat isn’t receiving the right balance of vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients from her food, her digestive health might suffer, meaning that hair doesn’t move through the digestive tract as easily. This causes hair to be regurgitated in the form of a hairball rather than come out in the feces. Talk to your vet for a recommendation on a great diet.

See the Vet

If your cat’s hairballs are becoming a problem, see your vet for advice. It’s even possible that medical issues are to blame! Call your veterinarian Glendale AZ today.

Hair Care Tips for Dogs

Dogs aren’t as good at grooming themselves as our feline friends. It’s up to you to help your canine companion maintain their coat of fur! Use these tips from your Aurora, CO veterinarian to do just that.

Brushing

Run a brush through your dog’s coat on a daily basis. This removes loose or dead hair, gets rid of grime under the fur, and smooths tangles. In addition, it spreads essential skin oils through the coat to moisturize it naturally, reducing shedding in the long run. Ask your vet to recommend the proper brush type for your dog’s fur.

Bathing

Bathing your dog occasionally is another good way to care for their coat. Don’t overdo bathing, though, as it can backfire and dry out the skin and fur if done too frequently. Always use a canine-formulated shampoo, as shampoos made for humans or other animals might be too strong.

Quality Diet

Did you know that feeding Fido a high-quality diet is one of the absolute best ways to care for his coat? When your dog receives the right nutrients, the hair and skin stays healthy!

For a recommendation on a diet for your dog, call your animal hospital Aurora, CO today.

Cold-Weather Care Tips for Your Pet

In most cases, our cats and dogs aren’t very well-equipped for cold weather. It’s up to you to keep your pet safe when wintertime comes along! Use these tips from a Crown Point, IN veterinarian to keep your animal friend safe during cold weather:

Indoor Time

Don’t let your pet stay outdoors for long periods—this will surely result in deadly hypothermia or dangerous frostbite, and it’s simply not worth the risk. Only allow your pet out for bathroom breaks and quick exercise sessions; otherwise, keep them indoors where they’ll be safe and warm.

Antifreeze Danger

Antifreeze is one of the most common wintertime hazards. That’s because it contains a chemical called ethylene glycol, which is highly toxic to animals and may even attract them with its sweet smell and taste. Store antifreeze very carefully, and keep pets indoors while using the chemical.

Avoid Ice

Ice may contain chemical melting products, and you don’t want your pet picking it up on their paws and ingesting it later when they lick themselves. To be safe, avoid ice patches whenever possible.

For more tips on keeping pets safe during cold weather, call your vet clinic Crown Point IN. We’re here to help!

Hazard Spots for Pets at Home

All things considered, your pet is safest indoors alongside you and your family. With that being said, don’t forget that there are a few danger zones! Learn how to keep your pet safe as your Lafayette, LA veterinarian elaborates below:

Kitchens

Kitchens contain all sorts of foods that aren’t good for your pet, including onions, garlic, chives, raisins and grapes, caffeinated foods and beverages, avocado, salty foods, chocolate, candy, and more. There are also sharp objects—knives, graters, soup can lids, etc.—that can harm your pet, and pets can burn themselves on hot surfaces like stovetops, toasters, and coffeepots.

Supply Closets

Did you know that almost any common cleaning product can harm a pet who ingests it? Never let your pet come in contact with household disinfectants, air fresheners, bleach, carpet shampoo, furniture polish, and other products. Keep your supply closet closed tightly at all times!

Medicine Cabinets

Many common medications—aspirin, cough syrup, antidepressants, prescription drugs, and more—can poison pets easily. Keep your medicine cabinet closed at all times so that pets can’t reach the pills inside, and store pet medications separately from your own.

For more pet safety tips, contact your animal clinic Lafayette, LA today.

Exercising a Cat Indoors

Do you own an indoor cat? It’s very important that they get their exercise to remain healthy! Here, your Coon Rapids, MN veterinarian tells you about some great ways to exercise your indoor feline.

Cat Tower

Browse the selection of cat tower structures at your local pet supply store. These items are great for allowing your cat to exercise herself, even when you’re not at home. They offer multiple platforms and built-in toys and scratching posts for your cat’s enjoyment.

Toys

When it comes to exercising your cat, there’s no better or easier way to do it than by using toys. What cat doesn’t love to dart after a piece of string dangling in front of their face? Stuffed animals, catnip toys, and other fun playthings are also great for getting your cat to move on a daily basis.

Laser Pointer

Have you ever tried out a laser pointer on your cat? Many of our feline friends love to dart after that pesky red light, and they’re getting great exercise in the process! Just make sure you don’t shine the light directly into your cat’s eyes.

For more information on your cat’s exercise needs, call your veterinary clinic Coon Rapids, MN.

Care Tips for Your Dog’s Coat

Caring for your dog’s coat is about more than good looks. It’s a key part of your dog’s health regimen! Here, your Ashburn, VA veterinarian gives you a few tips to help keep your dog’s coat of fur in tip-top shape.

Brushing

Brush your dog on a daily basis. It helps to remove loose and dead fur from the coat, and it spreads essential skin oils through the fur for natural moisturizing. It’s a great way to keep your dog looking great while benefiting their health!

Bathing

Bathing your dog occasionally is another great way to maintain their coat. Always use a canine-formulated shampoo, as other shampoos may not be safe for your dog’s sensitive skin, and be careful not to bathe too frequently. This can actually dry out the skin and lead to pesky irritation and increased shedding.

Diet Tips

Did you know that diet is key for having your dog’s coat stay healthy? When your dog receives the proper nutrients, the skin and fur stay in top form. Ask your vet for a recommendation on a great food choice for Fido.

For more information about your dog’s grooming and coat-care needs, call your veterinarian Ashburn, VA pet hospital today.

Lily Toxicity and Your Cat

Did you know that lilies are highly toxic to our feline friends? Don’t let your cat fall victim. Learn more below from a vet in Marietta, GA.

Are All Lilies Poisonous?

Not every type of lily is poisonous, but there enough dangerous varieties that you shouldn’t risk having lilies in your home or garden. Easter lilies, daylilies, Asiatic lilies, and tiger lilies are some of the most common toxic offenders.

What are the Symptoms of Lily Poisoning?

The initial symptoms of lily poisoning may include mouth irritation, excess drooling, and restlessness. Vomiting will ensue without treatment, possibly leading to serious dehydration and other related problems.

 

If you know or suspect that your cat has ingested part of a lily flower, take them to your veterinarian’s office right away. Treatment may involve induced vomiting or a stomach flush, as well as fluid replacement therapy and other supportive measures as your cat recovers.

Can I Prevent the Problem?

Yes, preventing lily poisoning is as easy as restricting your cat’s access to the flowers at all times. Don’t plant them in your garden or allow them in bouquets or floral arrangements.

Want more information on lily poisoning? Call your veterinarian Marietta, GA.

Why Spay or Neuter Your Dog or Cat?

Has your cat or dog been spayed or neutered? It’s one of the most important steps you can take to ensure your animal friend’s good health. To learn more about why your pet needs the procedure performed, read on as your Carmel, IN vet elaborates:

Essential Health Benefits

Spaying and neutering eliminate the risk of genital cancers and makes prostate, breast, and other cancer types extremely unlikely. In addition, common problems like urinary tract infections are far less likely to occur. It’s a great way to keep your pet healthy in the long-term—have your pet spayed or neutered early on.

Behavior Improvement

Pets who aren’t spayed or neutered tend to act out in undesirable ways, especially when breeding season arrives. Save yourself the trouble of house soiling, urine spraying, aggression, barking, chewing, digging, escape attempts, and more by having your pet spayed or neutered.

Pet Overpopulation

Spaying and neutering benefit more than just your pet. It contributes to the greater good by not allowing your pet to breed in an uncontrolled manner, thereby reducing the overall homeless pet population!

To have your pet’s spay or neuter surgery scheduled, contact your animal Hospital Carmel, IN today. We’re here for you!

Keeping Pets Safe in the Garden

It’s always fun to include your pet in festivities in the backyard. You might even enjoy gardening while your pet sunbathes. Just make sure your animal friend stays safe! Use these tips from an Indianapolis, IN veterinarian.

Toxic Plants and Flowers

There are all sorts of plants and flowers that can harm a pet who manages to ingest them. The list includes dieffenbachia, elephant ear, ivy, oleander, lilies, tulips, daffodils, poinsettias, the sago palm, and much more. Check your garden and landscaping, and remove any harmful offenders before allowing your pet outdoors.

Pesticides, Rodenticides

Do you spray pesticides or rodenticides on your lawn or garden to protect it from pests? Remember that these types of chemicals can prove very dangerous for our animal companions. Don’t let your pet near freshly treated vegetation, and store pesticide chemicals carefully.

Sharp Tools

Don’t leave sharp gardening tools—shears, shovels, clippers, or other blades—lying about in the yard where pets may be able to run across them. It’s all too easy for a pet to hurt themselves!

Would you like to know what kind of toxic plants are common in your area? Does your pet need veterinary attention? Call your veterinary clinic Indianapolis, IN.