The Basics of Dog and Cat Vaccination

If you own a dog or cat or are considering adopting one soon, vaccination will be an essential part of your pet’s good health. Learn the basics of pet vaccination from your veterinarian Ellicott City, MD:

Core Vaccines

The core vaccines are considered essential for all pets. That’s because of the dangerous and/or contagious characteristics of the diseases they prevent; core vaccines include those that protect against distemper, parvovirus, influenza, hepatitis, rabies and more.

Non-Core Vaccines

As the name implies, non-core vaccines aren’t needed for every cat or dog. They might help some, though, based on factors like exposure risk, environment, and location, etc. The Lyme disease vaccination, for instance, is recommended for pets living in areas where disease-carrying ticks are prevalent.


Most pets can receive vaccines as early as eight weeks of age or so. From there, the initial vaccine regimen concludes at about 16 weeks. Most vaccinations then need booster shots to help them remain effective over the course of your pet’s life—these may occur on a yearly or multi-year basis.

For more information about your pet’s vaccines, contact your veterinary clinic Ellicott City, MD. We’re here to help with all of your pet-care needs!

Explaining Your Cat’s Kneading

You’ve probably seen your cat knead—it’s when your cat presses the front paws into a soft object before lying down. Have you ever wondered why Fluffy does this? Your vet Marietta, GA fills you in on a few possibilities below:

Napping Prep

You’ve likely seen your cat knead before bedding down for a nap. It’s believed that our cats’ ancestors kneaded grass or dirt surfaces in the wild, preparing them as a bedding spot for themselves or their offspring. This behavior may have gotten passed down to our domesticated felines!

Territory Marking

Your cat’s paw pads contain scent glands, and scents are released when your cat kneads. It may be her way of marking her territory—that territory might be a pillow, a pet bed, or your leg!

Nursing Instinct

Did you know that kittens often knead their mother’s belly during the nursing period to stimulate milk production? Adult cats may knead as a sort of “remnant” behavior from kitten-hood, and they may even associate the action with the feelings of contentment they felt while nursing!

Want more information on your cat’s behavior? We’re here for you. Call your veterinarian Marietta, GA today to learn more about your pet.

Disaster Preparedness for Pet Owners

It’s no fun to think about a disaster situation befalling you or your pet. With that being said, being prepared is the best course of action! Here are a few disaster preparedness tips for pet owners from your veterinary clinic Glendale, AZ.

To-Go Kit

Have a to-go kit on hand in case you have to evacuate your home. Include a first-aid kit with all of the essential first-aid supplies, canned pet food and a can opener, water bottles and a water dish, soft towels, a pet bed, a leash and collar, and your pet’s updated medical records.

Plan Ahead

Research animal shelters, relief organizations, and pet-friendly hotels outside of town; you may have to visit these areas if you’re forced away from your home by a natural disaster, chemical spill, or some other catastrophe.

At Home

Think about a room in the middle of your home that doesn’t have windows. This is the best area you can go to if you’re forced to stay home during a disaster.

If you would like more tips about preparing for a disaster situation ahead of time and keeping your pet safe, contact your veterinary clinic Glendale, AZ. We’re here to help!

Common Cat Toxins

Although dogs are often more likely to gobble up whatever substance is in front of them, putting them at a somewhat greater risk for poisoning, cats are also susceptible! Here, your vet Aurora, CO tells you about some of the most common cat toxins to be aware of.

Poisonous Plants

Plenty of plants and flowers aren’t safe for cats, and they’re some of the most common toxins since our feline friends often like to munch on vegetation. Lilies are particularly poisonous, and other plants like dieffenbachia, elephant ear, certain aloe plants, rhododendron, and more can also pose a serious risk. Keep your cat away!

Human Foods

Garlic, onions, grapes and raisins, chocolate, candy, gum, alcohol… the list of potentially harmful foods is quite long! Don’t leave dangerous foods out on countertops; you know how easy it is for cats to leap up and start exploring!


Antifreeze is a particular problem during the winter months; it contains ethylene glycol, a poisonous alcohol substance. The problem is that antifreeze tastes and smells sweet, which may attract your cat! Use antifreeze carefully and clean up spills right away.

For more information on cat toxins, give your pet clinic Aurora, CO a call.