Trimming Fido’s Nails

If you own a dog, regular nail trims should be a part of Fido’s standard grooming routine. It’s easier said than done! Below, your Roanoke, VA vet tells you how to trim your dog’s nails in three easy steps.

Preparation

First, gather your supplies in a well-lit room where you’ll be performing the clipping. You’ll need a pair of clippers made just for dogs, a styptic powder or pen, and a few dog treats. It’s best to clip your dog’s nails when they’re sleepy, so as to avoid any fuss.

Trim the Tips

Select a paw to start with and clip the tips—only a few millimeters—of each nail. If you cut down too far, you’ll snip the blood vessel in the nail and cause bleeding. That’s where your styptic powder comes in.

Repeat and Reward

Once you’ve finished all the nails on one paw, reward Fido with a treat. Then, continue on to the other paws until you’re done, rewarding as you go. This tells your dog that staying still for nail trims warrants a reward!

If you would like the professionals to trim your dog’s nails, set up an appointment with your veterinary clinic Roanoke, VA  today.

Should I Allow My Dog to Eat Grass?

It’s not uncommon for our canine companions to eat grass every now and then. It might look odd, but the question is… is it safe? Here, your veterinarian Aurora, CO tells you more.

Why Exactly Do Dogs Eat Grass, Anyway?

There are a variety of theories as to why dogs might eat grass, although no one knows for sure. Most commonly, it’s thought that dogs may eat grass to induce vomiting, perhaps to alleviate gas or an upset stomach. Dogs also might eat grass to add some roughage to their diet, or because they’ve grown tired of their normal food.

Could Medical Problems Be to Blame?

Yes, a dog could be eating grass in an attempt to add essential nutrients—such as fiber—that they’re not receiving from their commercial diet. If you’ve noticed your dog eating grass frequently, it’s time to see the vet!

Is Eating Grass Safe for Dogs?

All things considered, it’s not worth the risk to let your dog eat grass. Even if a medical issue isn’t the cause, grass could be treated with fertilizers or other chemicals that you don’t want Fido ingesting!

Contact your animal hospital Aurora, CO today to make an office appointment.

Care Tips for Your Aging Cat

Is your cat getting along in years? It’s important to keep your senior feline friend’s health and well-being in mind. That way, their golden years will be their best yet! Learn more here from a veterinarian London, ON.

Proper Diet

The nutritional requirements of a senior cat are much different than a kitten’s. That’s why it’s imperative that your aging companion is eating a specially formulated diet made just for the needs of senior felines! Consult your vet for a recommendation on a great choice, and be sure to ask about the proper serving size.

Light Exercise

Don’t let your senior cat lay around all day; that’s a quick path to dangerous obesity. Make sure Fluffy gets moving every day for some light exercise. Use a favourite toy or a laser light pointer so that your cat can burn off some excess calories.

Veterinary Checkups

Now more than ever, your cat should be examined frequently by the veterinarian. Health troubles can sneak up on your cat quickly, and it’s best to have them addressed early.

Do you need to schedule an appointment for your feline friend? Have further questions about caring for a senior cat? Contact your vet London, ON.

Caring for Your Brachycephalic Dog

Brachycephalic dogs—breeds with squashed, flat faces like Boston terriers, pugs, English and French bulldogs, and the Pekingese—come with several unique care requirements and health risks. That’s why it’s important to take special care of your brachycephalic pet! Learn more here from a veterinarian Frisco, TX.

Keep Brachy Cool

Most brachycephalic breeds have small nostrils, a narrow windpipe, and an elongated soft palate, which presents breathing challenges. Since dogs pant to cool down, rather than sweating, it’s very easy for a brachycephalic dog to overheat! Keep your branchy cool at all times, and don’t over-exercise them.

Avoid Stress

For the same reason, don’t allow your brachycephalic dog to become stressed. Too much stress will lead to respiratory problems, and it won’t be as easy for your brachy to recover as it would be for other dog breeds.

Dental Care

Thanks to your brachy’s unique facial structure, the teeth tend to crowd together; other dental problems are also very common. Brush your pet’s teeth with a canine formulated toothpaste, and be sure to have their mouth examined at the vet’s office regularly.

Does your brachycephalic dog need a checkup? We’re here for you. Call your veterinary clinic Frisco, TX today!

Everything You Need to Know About the Sphynx Cat

The Sphynx cat conjures up thoughts of the ancient Egyptians and exotic adventures… how much do you really know about this fascinating feline? Learn more about the Sphynx in this article from a Lafayette, LA veterinarian.

History

Records of hairless cats date back as far as the early 1900s, but the Sphynx that we know of today can be dated more precisely to 1966. It was then, in Toronto, Canada, that a pair of domestic shorthairs produced a hairless litter because of a random genetic mutation. The Sphynx has been spreading ever since, and can now be found in various parts of the world!

Temperament and Personality

Sphynxes are high-energy cats, thanks to their hearty appetites and high metabolisms. A Sphynx will love jumping, running, and climbing, and they tend to be friendly, inquisitive, and intelligent animals. They’re a great cat for almost any family!

Care Requirements

Most of the Sphynx’s care needs are similar to that of other cats, save for one: their hairless body. A Sphynx will need regular baths to remove excess body oil that isn’t absorbed by fur. Sun protection is also extremely important!

Want to know more about Sphynx cats? Call your vet Lafayette, LA.