Rescue Pet Myths About Cats and Dogs

Unfortunately, there are several myths floating around when it comes to animal shelters and the pets inside of them. Allow your veterinarian Murrieta, CA to tell you the truth—here are three rescue pet myths that you shouldn’t believe:

Rescue Pets Are Old

Think rescue pets are old, unwanted animals? Not true. Pets of almost any age can be found in a shelter; elderly companions, middle-aged pets, and puppies and kittens alike! No matter the age of pet you’re considering, tour your local shelters to find it.

Rescue Pets Are Poorly Behaved

This isn’t true. Pets don’t often come to shelters because of poor behavior; issues like abandonment and uncontrolled breeding are far more common reasons. Most rescue pets are well-behaved or can be easily trained!

Rescue Pets Are Dirty

False! On the contrary, rescue facilities must be kept at a high standard of cleanliness and sanitation to prevent the spread of disease in an area with so many animals housed in close quarters. Shelter pets aren’t dirty!

Have you recently adopted a pet and need to make an appointment for their initial vaccinations and examination? We’re here to help. Set up an office visit at your vet clinic Murrieta, CA.

Xylitol and Its Danger for Your Pet

Have you ever heard of xylitol? It’s a sugar substitute found in many candies, gums, baked goods, and other products, like toothpaste. Xylitol is fine for humans, but very bad for pets! Learn more here from a vet Crown Point, IN.

Symptoms

The symptoms of xylitol can manifest themselves in as little as 30 minutes after your pet ingests something containing the poison. Symptoms include lethargy, uncoordinated movements, loss of appetite, and—without prompt treatment—seizures, coma, and even death. Rush your pet to the emergency room if you know or suspect that they’ve ingested xylitol.

Treatment

Your pet’s stomach may need to be flushed to rid the body of the toxin, and activated charcoal might help slow the absorption rate in body. As a pet recovers, supportive measures like fluid replacement and oxygen supplementation might be necessary.

How to Prevent Poisoning

As is the case with all poisonings, it’s easier to prevent xylitol poisoning than deal with it! Keep chocolate, candies, and all sweets out of your pet’s reach—store them in closed containers, cabinets, or the refrigerator.

Want to learn more about xylitol and other dangerous pet poisons? We’re here for you. Call your veterinarian Crown Point, IN.

How to Exercise Your Indoor Cat

It’s easy for an indoor cat to lay around all day, packing on the pounds and becoming unhealthier as time goes on. It’s up to you to exercise your feline friend! Here are three tips on exercising your indoor cat from a veterinarian Newmarket, ON.

Toys

What better way to get your cat moving than with a few fun toys? Toys let your cat exercise her body while having fun, and they encourage her to use her natural hunting and stalking instincts. Be sure to provide your cat with a few good toys at all times.

Cat Furniture

Cat towers allow your cat to exercise herself, even when you’re not at home, and they give her a high vantage point from which to survey her territory. Many cat towers even come with built-in toys and scratching posts! Browse the selection at your local pet supply store.

Catnip

If you’re having trouble enticing your cat into playing, why not use a bit of catnip? Sprinkle catnip on your cat’s toys or scratching post, and watch her go wild!

Does your cat need veterinary attention? Do you need vaccinations or pest-control medications for your pet? Call your animal hospital Newmarket, ON today.

Keeping Your Dog Safe When It’s Hot

Generally speaking, our dogs and extremely hot weather don’t mix. After all, Fido is covered in a layer of fur that he can’t take off! Here, your veterinarian Las Vegas, NV lists three easy ways to make sure your dog stays safe during hot weather.

Hydrate

The best thing to do for your dog when it’s hot is to provide him with a full dish of clean, cool, fresh water to drink from at all times. This keeps your pooch properly hydrated and staves off deadly heat exhaustion and dehydration. You can even add a few ice cubes to Fido’s dish on extremely hot days.

Limit Exercise

Don’t over-exercise your pet in hot weather, because it’s a quick way to have your dog develop heatstroke. Try to exercise your pooch in the early morning or evening hours, when it’s not so hot outside, and keep sessions short to make sure your dog doesn’t get overworked.

Pest Control

Keep your pet safe from fleas, ticks, worms, and other warm-weather pets with proper parasite control. Talk to your veterinarian if your dog needs preventatives.

Call your vet clinic Las Vegas, NV right away to learn more about hot-weather safety tips for dogs.