Introducing Two Dogs

Are you about to introduce a new dog to your current canine companion? Perhaps you’re setting up a doggy play date. In either case, it’s important to introduce two dogs properly and safely so that things go smoothly. Here, your Frisco, TX veterinarian gives you a few tips on doing just that.

Prepare a Neutral Territory

Step one is finding a neutral territory for the two dogs to meet. Pick a spot that neither dog has “claimed,” like a public park or a neighbor’s yard, so there is no territorial behavior. Make sure space is safe for the dogs; remove anything they could fight over (toys, bones, food, treats, etc.) as well as sharp objects and other hazards.

Take it Slow

Rule number one when having two dogs meet: take things slow. Let the dogs see each other from afar, then slowly move forward. Don’t let the dogs run-up to each other. Keep them leashed so that you can pull them away from each other if necessary.

Moving Forward

At home, keep separate areas for the dogs moving forward while they get to know each other better.

Need help with your dog’s behavior? Call your animal hospital Frisco, TX.

Help! My Dog is Shedding Too Much

Unless you own one of the few breeds of dog that doesn’t shed fur, you probably deal with some hair around your home. However, sometimes your dog’s shedding can get excessive. Follow these tips from a Crown Point, IN veterinarian if you think your dog’s shedding is out of hand:

Brush Regularly

Brushing your dog’s coat of fur regularly will do wonders for shedding. First of all, it traps much of your dog’s loose fur in the brush itself, preventing it from falling all over your floors and furniture. Secondly, brushing spreads essential skin oils through the coat to moisturize fur naturally, preventing shedding from the get-go.

Upgrade the Diet

Your dog’s diet has a lot to do with the amount of fur he sheds. When Fido isn’t receiving the right nutrients, the coat suffers. It may be time to upgrade your pooch to a high-quality, well-balanced diet! Talk to your vet for a recommendation.

See Your Vet

If you can’t determine why your dog is shedding too much and you can’t make it stop, call your vet. A medical problem, like pests or skin infections, could be the cause!

Schedule your dog’s appointment with your vet Crown Point, IN.

3 Cat Myths

Our feline friends are a little bit mysterious… we can’t always tell just what they’re thinking. Maybe that’s why there are many cat myths floating around! Below, your Sugar Land, TX veterinarian tells you more.

Cats Always Land Upright

This isn’t true. Cats are graceful, but they can slip and fall like anyone else. Cats myths can even fall awkwardly, potentially injuring themselves quite seriously. In your home, make sure your cat can’t get onto high window sills or balconies that she could potentially fall from.

Cats Purr When Happy

This is a half-truth. Cats do purr when they’re feeling contended, yes, but experts think that purring could also indicate a variety of other emotions. Some of them are even negative, like anger or stress!

Cats Love Milk

Your cat might happily love milk, but that doesn’t mean it’s good for her. The truth is that most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning that they can’t properly digest dairy. Too much milk will result in vomiting or diarrhea, so don’t give your cat more than a small serving.

Does your feline friend need a veterinary exam? Do you have more questions about Fluffy’s health or behavior? Contact your vet Sugar Land, TX.

Probiotics for Your Pet

Probiotics are rather common in the world of human healthcare. Did you know that they’re also available for pets? Probiotics can benefit your pet in a variety of ways. Learn more here from a Marietta, GA veterinarian.

What Are Probiotics, Anyway?

Probiotics are beneficial microbes that live in your pet’s small or large intestine. They keep “bad” microbes at bay and help to digest food, manufacture vitamins, and other nutrients, and get rid of harmful pathogens. Probiotics for pets might come in the form of a tablet or capsule or yogurt or kefir. It could also be included in pet food.

What Can Probiotics Do for My Pet?

Probiotics help maintain the proper intestinal microbial balance, so they can be prescribed to help with many kinds of digestive health issues. They can be given to manage or correct infestations or infections, regulate digestion, and even to help lower stress levels.

Does My Pet Need Probiotics?

To be safe, only give your pet a probiotic if it’s been cleared by your veterinarian. That way, you’ll be sure it’s completely safe for your beloved companion.

To learn more about your pet’s nutrition and diet, contact your animal hospital Marietta, GA today.

Chocolate Toxicity and Your Pet

You’re probably aware that chocolate and pets don’t mix. In fact, it’s one of the most dangerous toxins out there for our animal friends! Learn more about chocolate toxicity in dogs and cats as your Ashburn, VA veterinarian fills you in below:

Symptoms

The symptoms of chocolate toxicity include drooling, lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and—without prompt treatment—seizures, coma, and even death. Caffeine and theobromine are the ingredients in chocolate that don’t agree with our pets, and they’re found in all types: dark, semi-sweet, milk, white, powdered, etc.

Treatment

If you know or suspect that your pet has ingested chocolate, rush them to the vet’s office. The stomach may need to be flushed, or activated charcoal may be given to slow the toxin’s absorption in the stomach. As a pet recovers, fluid replacement, oxygen supplementation, and other methods might be needed to stabilize them fully.

Preventing Poisoning

Clearly, it’s worth preventing poisoning before it happens. That means keeping any and all chocolate and sweet treats out of your pet’s reach. Store these items in closed cabinets, containers, or the refrigerator so pets can’t gain access at any time.

Contact your animal hospital Ashburn, VA for more information on chocolate toxicity.

Brushing Fido’s Pearly Whites

Have you looked at your dog’s teeth lately? Dental health is very important for our canine companions because bad oral health can lead to a whole host of other problems. Here, let your Columbia, MD vet tell you how to brush your dog’s pearly whites.

Get Your Supplies

First, gather your supplies in a quiet, well-lit area of your home where you’ll perform Fido’s tooth brushing. You’ll need a pet toothbrush, a canine-formulated toothpaste, and a few tasty dog treats. Now, you’re ready to begin.

Brush

Allow Fido to smell and taste the toothpaste before dabbing a bit on the brush. Peel back your dog’s upper lip to expose the teeth, and begin brushing one section of the mouth. Only focus on the outer tooth surfaces; that’s where plaque tends to accumulate. Finish off the section with one final downward stroke of the brush.

Repeat and Reward

Now, continue around to all sections of your dog’s mouth with the brushing. Try giving your dog a tasty treat after each one so that he remains engaged in the brushing process.

Need help with your dog’s dental care? Want a recommendation on a good dog toothpaste? Call your veterinary clinic Columbia, MD.

Your Dog and Pink Eye

You’ve probably heard of pink eye; it’s relatively common in the human healthcare world. Pink eye can also affect dogs! Learn more below from your London, ON vet.

What Causes Pink Eye?

Pink eye, known medically as conjunctivitis, involves inflammation of the conjunctiva or the tissues around your dog’s eyes. It can occur entirely on its own (primary conjunctivitis), or secondarily to another disease or health issue (secondary conjunctivitis). Common causes include bacterial or viral infections, foreign bodies in the eye, glaucoma, eye trauma, and allergies.

What are the Signs?

The main sign of pink eye is a red and inflamed eye or eyelids. Other symptoms include excessive blinking, pawing at the yes, increased tear production, and eye discharge. Conjunctivitis most often occurs in both eyes simultaneously, although it can affect only one eye at a time.

How Is Pink Eye Treated?

First, your vet will perform a full eye exam. Next, the pink eye will need to be treated depending on what’s causing the issue at its root. In most cases, anti-inflammatory medication can be given to lessen the swelling and redness.

Does your dog need a veterinary exam? We’re here to help. Contact your vet clinic London, ON.