Pica in Dogs: What to Do When Your Dog Eats Foreign Objects

Pica means the craving and ingestion of non-food items by your dog. Those items could be almost anything—batteries, fabric, coins, dirt, rocks, and socks, for example! Obviously, this condition can prove very dangerous. Learn more here from a Westminster, MD vet.

Why Does Pica Occur?

A cause isn’t found in every case of pica. When it is, though, it’s generally thought of as either medical or behavioral. Medical pica means that a nutritional deficiency, diabetes, thyroid problem, or some other medical issue is causing your dog to ingest foreign bodies. In a behavioral case, an issue like anxiety is the root cause.

How is it Treated?

A medical case of pica must be dealt with by treating the underlying medical issue. In behavioral cases, it’s not so cut and dry—you might have to remove stressors at home, or hire a professional dog behaviorist, for example, to get to the root of the problem.

What Do I Do if My Dog Eats a Foreign Object?

If you know or suspect that your dog has eaten a foreign object, rush them to the vet’s office. Better safe than sorry!

Call your vets Westminster, MD to learn more about pica.

Myths About Your Cat

Don’t believe everything you hear about your feline friend! There are many myths and misconceptions about our cats, and they’re simply untrue. Allow your Newmarket, ON veterinarian to set the record straight:

Cats Always Land Upright

This isn’t true. Cats can slip and fall like anyone else, even though they’re often graceful and poised. Veterinarians even have a term referencing cats falling off of high ledges or windowsills: high-rise syndrome. Check all window screens in your home, and don’t let your cat relax on high ledges!

Cats Love Milk

This is a half-truth. Cats might love milk, but it won’t return the service. The truth is that most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning that they can’t digest milk properly. Too much will probably result in vomiting or diarrhea!

Cats Purr When Happy

This is also only half true. Cats do often purr when they’re feeling happy and content, yes. But many experts believe that purring can also indicate a variety of other emotions, such as anger, stress, or fear! You know your cat best, so pay attention to her mannerisms to know what she’s thinking.

Need to make an office appointment for your pet? Contact your veterinarians Newmarket, ON.

Can My Cat Eat Avocado?

Avocado usually appears on lists of foods that aren’t good for pets. It’s true—avocado and guacamole aren’t always safe for pets, but it turns out that they can offer some nutritional value. Let’s take a closer look at the issue as your Rochester, NY tells you more.

Avocado’s Benefits

The fruit of the avocado can provide nutrients to your cats, like vitamins A, E, C, B3 and B6, fiber, magnesium, and potassium. But is avocado worth the risk to get these nutrients? No, because your cat should be getting these nutrients from their regular food!

Avocado’s Risks

The stem, leaves, skin, pit, and fruit of the avocado contain a toxin called persin. It’s because of this poison that avocado is generally considered a bad idea for pets, your cat included. It would take a lot of avocado or guacamole to actually cause problems to your cat, but it’s really not worth the risk!

Can Cats Eat Avocado?

At the end of the day, it’s not worth the risk to feed your cat avocado. Plus, it’s doubtful that your feline friend would decide to eat it anyway!

Call your pet clinic Rochester, NY today for more information on toxic foods.