Understanding Your Cats Whiskers

When was the last time you thought about your cats whiskers? It’s something that’s easy to forget about, but your cat’s whiskers are very important. Learn more about these essential hairs in this article from a vet Marietta, GA.

What Do Whiskers Do?

Whiskers have a cluster of nerves at their base, making them powerful and sensitive sensory organs. Your cat uses them to detect changes in air currents, as well as determine the size, shape, location, and texture of objects in her environment. All of this helps your cat’s brain to paint a picture of her surroundings, coupled with other senses like sight and smell.

Do Whiskers Indicate My Cat’s Mood?

If your cat’s whiskers are sticking straight out from her face, as they usually are, she’s feeling calm and normal. When the whiskers get pulled back across the face, your cat is probably alarmed or frightened.

Should I Trim Fluffy’s Whiskers?

No! you should never trim a cat’s whiskers, as it would be like taking away an entire sense for them. Cats can become extremely disoriented, so make sure never to trim the whiskers.

Do you have questions about your cat’s health? Connect with your pet clinic Marietta, GA.

Why Isn’t My Cat Using Her Box?

Is your feline companion seemingly not using her litter box the way she should? It’s something that affects nearly one in every 10 cats, so you’re not alone. There are many possible reasons for this behavior—learn more here from a veterinarian Cincinnati, OH.

Poor Placement

Your cat is picky about where her bathroom is located. She doesn’t want to be disturbed while using it, so put it in a quiet, out-of-the-way location in the house. And make sure it’s easily accessible at all times, even when you’re not home.

Not Clean Enough

Who wants to use a dirty bathroom? Not your cat, that’s for sure! Clean the box regularly to make sure it stays perfectly fresh for your animal friend. Cats have been known to shun their bathroom entirely if it becomes too dirty.

Medical Issues

Of course, it’s possible that a medical concern—a urinary tract infection, physical injury, infection, and much more—could be causing your cat to eliminate on your floors. It’s time to see the vet if you can’t determine another cause for your cat’s poor litter box behavior.

Set up your cat’s appointment at your animal hospital Cincinnati, OH. We’re always here to help!

Dangerous Pet Toxins Already in Your House

Every good pet owner is aware of a few potential hazards. But did you know that there are probably some in your home right now? It’s almost unavoidable, but you can take steps to make sure your pet stays safe. Learn more here from a vet clinic in Jacksonville, FL.

Toxic Foods

There are all kinds of foods that pets shouldn’t eat, including onions, garlic, chives, leeks, scallions, shallots, grapes and raisins, chocolate, candy, gum, fatty foods, buttery foods, and alcohol, among others. Make sure your pet can’t get their paws on any dangerous foods!

Poisonous Plants

Dieffenbachia, chrysanthemums, Autumn crocus, elephant ear, daffodils, tulips, lilies, the sago palm, ivy, oleander, philodendron, azalea… the list of potentially toxic plants for pets goes on. Check your home and landscaping for any offenders and remove them at once.

Medication

Human medications like painkillers, cough syrup, antidepressants, and much more can harm a pet. Some medicines that are prescribed to pets, such as pain medications, can even prove toxic in a high enough dosage. Store your medication carefully and follow instructions to the letter when giving your pet medicine.

Learn more about pet toxins in your home by calling your animal hospital Jacksonville, FL today.

3 Cat Myths That Just Aren’t True

It’s a safe bet that you’ve heard a myth or two about cats, even if you didn’t know it was a myth. Our feline friends are pretty mysterious! But it’s important that you don’t believe everything you hear. Learn more here as your vet clinic Wichita, KS sets the record straight.

Cats Always Land Upright

This isn’t true. Cats are graceful and often land on their feet, yes, but that doesn’t mean they’re infallible. Cats can actually injure themselves from falling, especially if the fall is shorter and the cat doesn’t have time to right themselves before impact.

Cats Love Milk

This is only half-true: Cats might love milk, but it isn’t good for them. Most adult cats are actually lactose-intolerant, meaning they can’t digest the main enzyme of milk. A cat who drinks milk will probably experience an upset stomach, vomiting, or diarrhea!

Cats Purr When They’re Happy

Another half-truth! Cats do purr when they’re feeling content, yes, but experts believe that purring can also indicate other emotions—that includes negative feelings like anxiety and anger.

Your veterinary clinic Wichita, KS is here for all of your cat’s health needs. Call the office today to make your cat’s next appointment!

All About Fluffy’s Whiskers

All of our feline companions have whiskers coming out of their face. Have you ever wondered to yourself what whiskers do, exactly? You may be surprised to find that they’re an essential part of your cat’s anatomy. Learn more here from a pet clinic Washington DC.

What Do Whiskers Do?

Each of your cat’s whiskers have a cluster of nerves at the base, making them powerful sensory organs. They detect air-current changes and help Fluffy to determine the size, placement, and texture of objects around her. In essence, whiskers send a “picture” to your cat’s brain of the world around her, along with her eyes and other sense.

Can Whiskers Indicate My Cat’s Mood?

Yes. When your cat’s whiskers are sticking sideways out of her face like normal, she’s content and calm. If they’re pulled back across the face, she’s probably alarmed or frightened. Try using your cat’s whisker position as a gauge on her mood.

Should I Trim My Cat’s Whiskers?

No—never trim your cat’s whiskers. It can disorient your pet and cause serious health problems. It would be like having an entire sense removed completely!

To learn more about your cat’s health, call your veterinary clinic Washington DC.

How Antioxidants Benefit Your Dog or Cat

Antioxidants are found in many human foods and offer plenty of benefits. The same is true for your pet! Below, your veterinarian London, ON explains how antioxidants in your pet’s diet help them live a healthier life.

They Boost the Immune System

Free radicals are harmful agents in your pet’s system that contain oxygen. Antioxidants, as the name suggests, counter oxygen and therefore fight against free radicals. In effect, this boosts your pet’s immune system functionality. Antioxidants are especially helpful for sick pets, pets who have been exposed to toxins, or a pet who isn’t receiving the right nutrition.

They Slow Down Aging

Well, that’s partially true—nothing can really “slow” the aging process. But antioxidants have been shown to keep older pets’ brains functioning at higher levels. That’s why you’ll usually find antioxidants in senior pet food!

They Keep Food Fresh

Another key benefit of antioxidants is that they keep your pet’s food fresh. Oxygen tends to spoil food over long periods of time, thanks to the process known as oxidation. Antioxidants slow that process down, keeping food fresher for longer.

Want advice on your pet’s diet and nutrition? That’s where we come in. Contact your animal hospital London, ON.

Quick Tips to Boost Fido’s Coat Quality

It’s up to you to keep your dog’s coat in good shape. After all, Fido isn’t as good as our feline friends when it comes to grooming himself. Use these tips from an animal hospital Anderson, IN to make sure your dog’s coat quality stays in top form.

Feed the Right Food

What your dog eats has a lot to do with how he looks on the outside. That’s because good nutrition benefits your pup’s skin and hair follicles, creating a healthy, smooth, shiny coat. Ask your vet for a recommendation on a great diet choice for your dog.

Brush Regularly

Brush your dog on a regular basis for maximum coat health. Brushing not only traps loose fur in the brush to prevent hair from winding up all over your home, but it’s also good for your dog’s skin and fur.

Bathe Occasionally

Bathing your dog every once in a while is another good way to keep the skin and fur clean. Don’t bathe too frequently, though—this can dry out the skin and fur, leading to a dull, coarse coat and more shedding. And always use a canine-formulated shampoo!

For more tips on good coat care, contact your pet clinic Anderson, IN.

Getting Your Puppy to Sleep Through the Night

Have you brought home a puppy recently? One of the biggest challenges for many puppy owners is getting their furry companion to sleep through the night. It’s easier said than done, and it’s not a perfect science, but here are some tips from a vet Aurora, CO to help your pup stay asleep for as long as possible.

Wear Little Fido Out Before Bed

When you exercise your puppy vigorously a short time before bed, he or she will wear themselves out and be more likely to fall into a deep sleep for the majority of the night. Just make sure to time it right—you don’t want to amp up your puppy a few minutes before bed because then he won’t be sleepy for a long time.

Final Bathroom Break

Make sure your puppy has used the bathroom outdoors one final time before bed. If little Fido has to pee or poop overnight, he’ll be sure to whine and let you know.

Make the Crate Appealing

When your puppy’s crate is appealing, he’s more likely to relax in it. Include a soft blanket and a fun chew toy.

For help with puppy care, call your animal hospital Aurora, CO.