Antifreeze Poisoning in Cats

Antifreeze is sometimes added to cars’ engines to keep them running properly in cold weather. But did you know that it’s a hazardous pet toxin and that it could seriously harm your feline friend? Learn more below from a vet in Rochester, NY.

The Toxic Agent

Antifreeze is typically made with something called ethylene glycol, toxic alcohol that can poison pets—and humans—even in small amounts. Even worse, antifreeze tastes and smells sweet to pets, so they might be attracted to it!

Symptoms of Poisoning

The symptoms of antifreeze poisoning in a cat include lethargy, vomiting, nausea, uncoordinated movements, excessive urination, and diarrhea. Without treatment, your cat can experience seizures, slip into a coma, or die.

Preventing Poisoning

When using antifreeze, make sure your cat is inside. Clean up any spills right away, and store the chemical safely where no pets can reach. You’ll also want to make sure to choose antifreeze made with propylene glycol, not ethylene glycol, as the main ingredient, as it’s much safer for animals. This way, you’re avoiding the risk entirely.

Contact your vet clinic Rochester, NY to learn more about pet toxins in and around your home. We’re always here to help!

Care Tips for Your Older Dog

If you have an aging dog on your hands, it’s important to know that he or she has very specific care needs. Your older pooch’s healthcare needs are much different now than they were years ago! Your vet London, ON tells you more below.

The Right Diet

Your senior dog needs the right nutrients in the right portion sizes to thrive. Your pooch should be eating a specially formulated senior diet made just for the needs of older dogs. Ask your vet for a recommendation, and don’t forget to ask about a portion size measurement.

Creature Comforts

Consider adding rugs or strips of carpet to slippery tile or wooden floors; this can help your older dog secure their footing when traversing the house. Try adding pet ramps or stairs to your home to allow your dog to get up on his favorite chair or bed.

Veterinary Checkups

Now more than ever, your dog should be seen by your veterinarian on a frequent basis. That way, your vet can catch any health concerns early on and treat them before they develop into something more problematic.

Is your senior dog due for an appointment? Call your animal hospital London, ON right away.

Why Your Dog Eats Dirt

Has your dog been eating a lot of dirt lately? It’s not uncommon for our canine friends to munch on dirt in the great outdoors, but it’s not necessarily normal behavior. Learn more below from a vet in Frisco, TX.

Behavioral Reasons

If a dog doesn’t get enough activity and engagement on a daily basis, they may start to act out in undesirable ways. One of those could be by eating things they aren’t supposed to! Make sure your dog gets daily exercise and playtime so that they don’t get bored.

Medical Reasons

It’s possible for a variety of medical reasons—pica, a condition in which dogs crave and ingest non-food items, for instance—to cause dirt-eating. Your dog could even have anemia or a nutritional deficiency!

What to Do If Your Dog Eats Dirt

If your dog won’t stop eating dirt whenever he or she goes outdoors, it’s time to call your veterinarian. Your vet will be able to examine your pup and determine if a medical issue is underlying the behavior, or if it’s a behavioral cause like anxiety or boredom. Then, you can get started on resolving the problem.

Call your pet clinic Frisco, TX for help.

Diarrhea In Dogs

It’s something that almost every dog and owner will have to deal with at some point or another: diarrhea. It’s not pleasant, but it’s a part of life. Below, your vets Aurora, CO tells you more about the possible causes of diarrhea and what to do about it.

Possible Causes

There are many possible causes of diarrhea, including dietary change, intestinal parasites, viral or bacterial infections, illnesses, allergies, poisoning, stress or anxiety, or reaction to medication. Your veterinarian will need to examine your pup to determine the exact cause of the problem.

Examine the Contents

Sometimes, you’ll be able to tell what’s causing Fido’s diarrhea by examining the stools (gross, we know). Small white bits usually indicates a worm infestation; green bits means your dog is eating grass, which could be because of a nutritional deficiency or a gallbladder issue.

Responding to Fido’s Diarrhea

If your dog has diarrhea and you’re concerned, call your vet’s office. Your best course of action is to get the professionals to examine your pup so he can get back to full health.

Need to make an appointment for your dog? Contact your vet clinic Aurora, CO today to get started. We’re here to help!

Eco-Friendly Pet Care Tips

Who doesn’t want to live more sustainably? As a pet owner, you can take several steps to live in an eco-friendly way. Here are a few tips from your vet London, ON.

Try Sustainable Products

Purchase planet-friendly pet products, like biodegradable poop bags, “green” shampoos, and eco-friendly stain removers. You can also find toys made from recycled materials. The possibilities are endless, and every small effort makes a big difference!

Feed Eco-Friendly Food

Choose pet food that’s packaged in biodegradable or recycled bags. Do your research to find food companies that are committed to lowering their carbon footprint and environmental impact. You can also make your own pet treats at home to reduce waste—always check with your vet to make sure your ingredients are safe for your animal friend.

Adopt, Don’t Shop!

Getting your pet from a breeder or pet store perpetuates the cycle of breeding, which isn’t very sustainable for the environment. Adopting from a shelter, on the other hand, frees up food, medicine, and equipment to help other animals and ultimately helps the shelter conserve its energy and resources.

Want more tips on eco-friendly pet care? We’re here to help. Contact your veterinary clinic London, ON today.

The ABCs of Catnip

You’ve probably heard of catnip. It’s entirely likely that you’ve tried it out on your feline friend. But what do you know about your cat’s favorite indulgence? Learn more here from a veterinarian Murrieta, CA.

What Exactly is Catnip?

Catnip is an herb, related closely to mint, basil, and other common herbs. You can purchase “raw” catnips, which is a dried and processed version of the wild plant, or toys or spray products that have catnip infused into them.

Why Does Catnips Affect Cats?

Catnip contains a chemical called nepetalactone, and it causes a reaction in your cat’s brain. Some experts liken it to a kind of sexual response since the part of the brain that’s triggered is the same one responsible for sexual urges. It’s a kind of feline aphrodisiac!

Is Catnips Safe?

Yes, catnip is perfectly safe. The chemical reaction in the brain isn’t harmful whatsoever, and your cat can’t overdose or become addicted. And some cats don’t respond at all—they need a particular gene to feel the effects of the herb, and only about half of all cats possess it.

Want more information on catnips and your feline friend’s behavior? Contact your animal hospital Murrieta, CA.

Probiotic Supplements and Your Pet

You’ve probably heard of probiotics, as they’re very helpful in the world of human health and medicine. You might have even taken one yourself. But can pets have probiotic supplements? Learn more here from a veterinarian New Orleans, LA.

What Are Probiotics?

A probiotic is a beneficial microbe that’s found in your pet’s small or large intestine. They help to keep the “bad” microbes at bay in these areas and are helpful for digesting food, destroying pathogens, and manufacturing vitamins and other nutrients.

What Can Probiotics Do for Pets?

Your pet might use a probiotic to regulate digestive health, help treat infections or infestations, or even to minimize stress. Most often, probiotics are prescribed when your pet needs help dealing with some kind of digestive issue. The probiotic itself might come in a tablet or capsule form, or in a yogurt or kefir product.

Should I Give My Pet a Probiotic?

Check with your veterinarian to find out if your pet would benefit from a probiotic before deciding to give them one. That way, you know for sure that it’s completely safe!

To learn more about your pet’s digestive health and nutrition, call your vet clinic New Orleans, LA today.

How to Combat Pet Odors at Home

Let’s face it—sometimes, our homes can start to smell a little bit too much like our pets. Pets just have a natural odor, and that can transfer into your carpets and furniture! Luckily, something can be done; learn more from a vet Washington DC.

Grooming

Groom your pet on a daily basis, because it will do wonders for odors. Brushing regularly removes grime from the coat and keeps fur from falling all over your home. The occasional bath—using a canine- or feline-formulated shampoo—will keep your companion smelling great for weeks to come.

Odor Neutralizers

Air fresheners just mask over smells, letting them return over time. An odor neutralizer, though, destroys enzymes that cause odors in the first place. There are products to combat stains and odors from vomit, feces, urine, and more! Browse the selection at your local pet store.

See the Vet

Does your pet smell particularly strong, or has an odor seemingly come out of nowhere? Schedule an office appointment to have your pet examined. Various health issues—skin infection, parasites, rotting teeth, and more—could be the root cause of the smell!

Contact your vet clinic Washington DC to learn more about pet odors.

Pica in Dogs: What to Do When Your Dog Eats Foreign Objects

Pica means the craving and ingestion of non-food items by your dog. Those items could be almost anything—batteries, fabric, coins, dirt, rocks, and socks, for example! Obviously, this condition can prove very dangerous. Learn more here from a Westminster, MD vet.

Why Does Pica Occur?

A cause isn’t found in every case of pica. When it is, though, it’s generally thought of as either medical or behavioral. Medical pica means that a nutritional deficiency, diabetes, thyroid problem, or some other medical issue is causing your dog to ingest foreign bodies. In a behavioral case, an issue like anxiety is the root cause.

How is it Treated?

A medical case of pica must be dealt with by treating the underlying medical issue. In behavioral cases, it’s not so cut and dry—you might have to remove stressors at home, or hire a professional dog behaviorist, for example, to get to the root of the problem.

What Do I Do if My Dog Eats a Foreign Object?

If you know or suspect that your dog has eaten a foreign object, rush them to the vet’s office. Better safe than sorry!

Call your vets Westminster, MD to learn more about pica.

Myths About Your Cat

Don’t believe everything you hear about your feline friend! There are many myths and misconceptions about our cats, and they’re simply untrue. Allow your Newmarket, ON veterinarian to set the record straight:

Cats Always Land Upright

This isn’t true. Cats can slip and fall like anyone else, even though they’re often graceful and poised. Veterinarians even have a term referencing cats falling off of high ledges or windowsills: high-rise syndrome. Check all window screens in your home, and don’t let your cat relax on high ledges!

Cats Love Milk

This is a half-truth. Cats might love milk, but it won’t return the service. The truth is that most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning that they can’t digest milk properly. Too much will probably result in vomiting or diarrhea!

Cats Purr When Happy

This is also only half true. Cats do often purr when they’re feeling happy and content, yes. But many experts believe that purring can also indicate a variety of other emotions, such as anger, stress, or fear! You know your cat best, so pay attention to her mannerisms to know what she’s thinking.

Need to make an office appointment for your pet? Contact your veterinarians Newmarket, ON.