Can My Cat Eat Avocado?

Avocado usually appears on lists of foods that aren’t good for pets. It’s true—avocado and guacamole aren’t always safe for pets, but it turns out that they can offer some nutritional value. Let’s take a closer look at the issue as your Rochester, NY tells you more.

Avocado’s Benefits

The fruit of the avocado can provide nutrients to your cats, like vitamins A, E, C, B3 and B6, fiber, magnesium, and potassium. But is avocado worth the risk to get these nutrients? No, because your cat should be getting these nutrients from their regular food!

Avocado’s Risks

The stem, leaves, skin, pit, and fruit of the avocado contain a toxin called persin. It’s because of this poison that avocado is generally considered a bad idea for pets, your cat included. It would take a lot of avocado or guacamole to actually cause problems to your cat, but it’s really not worth the risk!

Can Cats Eat Avocado?

At the end of the day, it’s not worth the risk to feed your cat avocado. Plus, it’s doubtful that your feline friend would decide to eat it anyway!

Call your pet clinic Rochester, NY today for more information on toxic foods.

Can Dogs Eat Avocado?

Avocado frequently appears on lists of dangerous human foods for dogs. And it’s true—avocado isn’t always safe for our canine friends, although it can, in fact, offer some health benefits. Allow your Aurora, CO vet to set the record straight below:

Avocado’s Benefits

The fleshy fruit of the avocado can provide some nutrients to your dog, just like it can to you. Those nutrients include vitamins A, B3 and B6, C, and E, as well as potassium, magnesium, amino acids, antioxidants, folate, and fiber.

The Drawbacks of Avocado

Every part of the avocado plant—including the fruit—contains a level of persin, a toxic agent that can harm dogs. It would take a lot of avocados to actually cause poisoning, though. The bigger danger is the avocado’s pit or seed, which a dog can easily choke on.

Can Dogs Eat Avocado?

Technically, dogs can eat the fruit of the avocado without experiencing harm. But they don’t need avocado as a part of the diet assuming they’re getting the right nutrients from their normal dog food! Overall, feeding your dog avocado isn’t worth the risk.

Want to learn more about your dog’s diet and nutrition? Contact your veterinarian Aurora, CO.

Probiotics for Pets: Does Your Pet Need One?

You may have heard of probiotics before, as they’re relatively common in human healthcare. You might have even tried a probiotic yourself. Were you aware that pets can also benefit from probiotics? Learn more below from a Savannah, GA vet.

What Are Probiotic, Anyway?

Probiotics are beneficial microbes that live in your pet’s intestinal tract. They keep “bad” microbes from affecting your pet’s health; probiotics help to digest food, manufacture vitamins, and other nutrients and destroy pathogens in the system. Probiotics made for pets might be included in pet food, or it may come in a tablet form or in a yogurt or kefir product.

What Does Probiotic Do for Pets?

Probiotics are often prescribed to help with health issues involving digestive problems since they help to regulate intestinal microbial balance. A probiotic may be prescribed to regulate digestion, minimize stress, or manage or correct infections and infestations.

Does My Pet Need to Take a Probiotic?

As a rule of thumb, check with your veterinarian before giving a probiotic supplement to your pet. That way, you know for sure that it’s safe!

To learn more about probiotics for your pet, contact your veterinarians Savannah, GA. We’re here for you!

Lily Toxicity and Your Feline Friend

Lilies are very common flowers, and you might even have them in your home right now. Did you know that lilies are very toxic to cats? Learn more here from a Glendale, AZ veterinarian.

Symptoms of Poisoning

Some lilies only cause minor mouth irritation, while some cause more serious symptoms like loss of appetite, lethargy, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, and—without treatment—seizures and even death. The Easter, tiger, Japanese snow, day, wood, and Stargazer lilies are some of the most common offenders.

Treating Poisoning

A cat who has eaten a lily flower should be taken to the emergency room. Activated charcoal may be given to slow the toxin’s absorption in the gut, or the stomach may be flushed. Fluid replacement therapy, oxygen supplementation, and other supportive measures might be needed as the patient recovers.

Preventing Toxicity 

Prevent lily Toxicity in the first place, rather than dealing with it after the fact. Lilies are common in bouquets and floral arrangements, and can also be planted in landscaping areas—check these areas to make sure you’re not keeping a harmful plant within reach of your cat.

Ready to learn more about lily Toxicity in cats? Contact your animal hospital Glendale, AZ today.

Dental Care for Fido

When was the last time you took a look at your dog’s teeth? Dental care is extremely important for dogs because dental disease is very common––and very dangerous. Use these tips from your Burlington, ON veterinarian to make sure Fido’s pearly whites stay in great shape: 

Brush the Teeth

Brush your dog’s teeth on a regular basis using a canine-formulated toothpaste and a pet toothbrush. Start by simply massaging your dog’s gums with your finger; gross, we know, but it gets your dog used to the brushing sensation. Then, slowly introduce the paste and brush. Work your way around your dog’s whole mouth, then offer a treat for a job well-done. 

Proper Diet and Fresh Water

Feeding your dog the right diet means he’s getting the right nutrients for gum and tooth health. Fresh water helps to flush out the mouth and get rid of leftover food particles, bacteria, and other grime. 

Chew Toys

Chew toys provide hours of fun, but they also help to scrape away some of the loose plaque on Fido’s teeth. That’s a great way to remove it before it hardens into tartar. 

Learn more by calling your animal hospital Burlington, ON. We’re here to help! 

Taking Good Care of Your Pup’s Coat

Do you own a dog? They’re not as good as cats are at maintaining their own coats of fur. That’s where you come in. Use these tips from a Burlington, ON veterinarian to take good care of Fido’s coat.

Brushing

Brush your dog’s fur on a daily basis using a brush made specifically for your dog’s type and length of hair. (Ask your vet for a recommendation.) Brushing smooths tangles, gets rid of grime underneath the fur, and spreads natural skin oils through the coat to moisturize it effectively.

Bathing

Bathing your dog occasionally with a canine-formulated shampoo is another way to make sure the coat stays in peak condition. Don’t use human shampoo or shampoo made for other animals as it may be too sensitive for Fido’s skin, and don’t bathe too often—that can dry out the coat and make for more shedding.

Feeding a Great Diet

Last but not least, giving Fido proper nutrition via a great diet is the best way to make sure the coat stays pristine. Ask your vet to recommend a high-quality food choice for your pooch’s needs.

Want to learn more about your dog’s grooming needs? Call your veterinarian Burlington, ON.

Xylitol Poisoning 101 in Dogs and Cats

Have you ever heard of xylitol? It’s an artificial sweetener used in many candies, gums, and other products like toothpaste. It’s okay for humans but toxic for animals! Your London, ON veterinarian tells you more below.

Symptoms

The symptoms of xylitol poisoning can come on in as little as 30 minutes after ingestion. They include lethargy, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, and—without quick treatment—seizures, coma, and even death.

Treatment

Take your pet to the emergency room if you know or suspect that they’ve eaten something containing xylitol. The stomach may be flushed, or your vet may administer activated charcoal to absorb the remaining toxin in the gut. As a pet recovers, fluid therapy to replace water and electrolyte levels may be needed. Oxygen supplementation and other medical methods might even be necessary in severe cases.

Prevention

Prevent xylitol poisoning in the first place by restricting your pet’s access to any sweet treats. Don’t leave goodies lying about on the counter, where a pet could swipe them down. Check the ingredients list on common human foods (like peanut butter) that you may try and give to your pet.

Learn more about xylitol by calling your veterinary clinic London, ON for help.

Why Exactly Do Dogs Pant?

If you own a dog, you’ve undoubtedly seen them pant. Have you ever wondered why it is, exactly, that your dogs pant? It turns out that there are several possibilities. Learn more from a Fort Collins, CO veterinarian.

Cooling Themselves Down

Most often, a dog is panting in order to cool themselves down. Since dogs don’t sweat the way we do, they need another method for lowering body temperature. When panting happens, moisture evaporates from the tongue, nasal passages, and lining of the lungs. When the air produced by panting passes over these moist membranes, your dog’s body cools itself.

Panting Because of Stress

Panting may also occur as a reaction to some kind of stressful stimuli, like a thunderstorm or a new pet in the house. When this happens, your dog isn’t panting because of the temperature at all. It’s a natural stress reaction!

Panting Because of Medical Issues

It’s also possible that your dog might be panting because of a medical issue. If you’re concerned about your dog’s panting, it’s better to be safe than sorry. Call your vet right away!

To learn more about your dog’s behavior and health, contact your animal hospital Fort Collins, CO today.

Introducing Two Dogs

Are you about to introduce a new dog to your current canine companion? Perhaps you’re setting up a doggy play date. In either case, it’s important to introduce two dogs properly and safely so that things go smoothly. Here, your Frisco, TX veterinarian gives you a few tips on doing just that.

Prepare a Neutral Territory

Step one is finding a neutral territory for the two dogs to meet. Pick a spot that neither dog has “claimed,” like a public park or a neighbor’s yard, so there is no territorial behavior. Make sure space is safe for the dogs; remove anything they could fight over (toys, bones, food, treats, etc.) as well as sharp objects and other hazards.

Take it Slow

Rule number one when having two dogs meet: take things slow. Let the dogs see each other from afar, then slowly move forward. Don’t let the dogs run-up to each other. Keep them leashed so that you can pull them away from each other if necessary.

Moving Forward

At home, keep separate areas for the dogs moving forward while they get to know each other better.

Need help with your dog’s behavior? Call your animal hospital Frisco, TX.

Help! My Dog is Shedding Too Much

Unless you own one of the few breeds of dog that doesn’t shed fur, you probably deal with some hair around your home. However, sometimes your dog’s shedding can get excessive. Follow these tips from a Crown Point, IN veterinarian if you think your dog’s shedding is out of hand:

Brush Regularly

Brushing your dog’s coat of fur regularly will do wonders for shedding. First of all, it traps much of your dog’s loose fur in the brush itself, preventing it from falling all over your floors and furniture. Secondly, brushing spreads essential skin oils through the coat to moisturize fur naturally, preventing shedding from the get-go.

Upgrade the Diet

Your dog’s diet has a lot to do with the amount of fur he sheds. When Fido isn’t receiving the right nutrients, the coat suffers. It may be time to upgrade your pooch to a high-quality, well-balanced diet! Talk to your vet for a recommendation.

See Your Vet

If you can’t determine why your dog is shedding too much and you can’t make it stop, call your vet. A medical problem, like pests or skin infections, could be the cause!

Schedule your dog’s appointment with your vet Crown Point, IN.