How to Cut Down Your Cat’s Hairball Production

Since cats ingest a bit of hair every time that they groom themselves, some hairballs are a natural part of life for our feline friends. There are a few ways you can cut down on the amount of hairballs your pet produces, though! Learn more here from a Glendale, AZ veterinarian.

Grooming

By running a brush through your cat’s coat on a daily basis, you’re trapping a lot of the loose and dead hair from her coat in the brush itself. This prevents her from ingesting it, ultimately reducing hairball production. Ask your vet to recommend a good brush type for your cat’s fur.

Diet Changes

If your cat isn’t receiving the right balance of vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients from her food, her digestive health might suffer, meaning that hair doesn’t move through the digestive tract as easily. This causes hair to be regurgitated in the form of a hairball rather than come out in the feces. Talk to your vet for a recommendation on a great diet.

See the Vet

If your cat’s hairballs are becoming a problem, see your vet for advice. It’s even possible that medical issues are to blame! Call your veterinarian Glendale AZ today.

Exercising a Cat Indoors

Do you own an indoor cat? It’s very important that they get their exercise to remain healthy! Here, your Coon Rapids, MN veterinarian tells you about some great ways to exercise your indoor feline.

Cat Tower

Browse the selection of cat tower structures at your local pet supply store. These items are great for allowing your cat to exercise herself, even when you’re not at home. They offer multiple platforms and built-in toys and scratching posts for your cat’s enjoyment.

Toys

When it comes to exercising your cat, there’s no better or easier way to do it than by using toys. What cat doesn’t love to dart after a piece of string dangling in front of their face? Stuffed animals, catnip toys, and other fun playthings are also great for getting your cat to move on a daily basis.

Laser Pointer

Have you ever tried out a laser pointer on your cat? Many of our feline friends love to dart after that pesky red light, and they’re getting great exercise in the process! Just make sure you don’t shine the light directly into your cat’s eyes.

For more information on your cat’s exercise needs, call your veterinary clinic Coon Rapids, MN.

Lily Toxicity and Your Cat

Did you know that lilies are highly toxic to our feline friends? Don’t let your cat fall victim. Learn more below from a vet in Marietta, GA.

Are All Lilies Poisonous?

Not every type of lily is poisonous, but there enough dangerous varieties that you shouldn’t risk having lilies in your home or garden. Easter lilies, daylilies, Asiatic lilies, and tiger lilies are some of the most common toxic offenders.

What are the Symptoms of Lily Poisoning?

The initial symptoms of lily poisoning may include mouth irritation, excess drooling, and restlessness. Vomiting will ensue without treatment, possibly leading to serious dehydration and other related problems.

 

If you know or suspect that your cat has ingested part of a lily flower, take them to your veterinarian’s office right away. Treatment may involve induced vomiting or a stomach flush, as well as fluid replacement therapy and other supportive measures as your cat recovers.

Can I Prevent the Problem?

Yes, preventing lily poisoning is as easy as restricting your cat’s access to the flowers at all times. Don’t plant them in your garden or allow them in bouquets or floral arrangements.

Want more information on lily poisoning? Call your veterinarian Marietta, GA.

Why Does My Cat Knead?

You’ve probably seen your cat knead before, although you may not have known that the maneuver had a name. Kneading involves your cat pressing her front paws into a soft object in an alternate pattern. Learn about the reasons behind this behavior as your Bowmanville, ON vet tells you more.

Napping

Your cat’s ancient ancestors may have kneaded hard dirt or grass surfaces to prepare them as nests. It’s possible that your cat has retained this behavior through the generations—that’s why you probably see your cat knead before napping!

Nursing Instinct

Did you know that kittens often knead their mother’s belly during nursing? It’s thought that this action stimulates milk production in the mother. Your adult cat might experience feelings of contentment associated with children when they knead!

Territory Marking

Your cat’s paw pads contain scent glands, and these scents are released when Fluffy’s paws are pressed into an object. In this manner, your cat may be marking her territory while she kneads her bed, a pillow, or her favorite blanket.

Remember: all cats are unique, and all felines have their own fun quirks. For more information on your particular cat’s behavior patterns, contact your animal hospital Bowmanville, ON.

Why Spay or Neuter Your Cat?

Spaying or neutering your cat has one obvious advantage: you won’t have a sudden, unexpected litter of kittens on your hands. Spaying and neutering also offer other advantages! Your veterinarian Rochester, NY tells you more below:

Health Benefits

A cat who has been spayed or neutered doesn’t have a risk of developing genital cancers, and the risk of prostate, breast, and other cancer types is greatly minimized. Urinary tract infections are a particular problem amongst cats, and these are far less likely to occur in cats who have been spayed or neutered.

Improved Behavior

Aggression in male cats, spraying behavior, loud vocalizations and urine spraying during the heat period of female cats… problems like these can be virtually eliminated or greatly lessened simply by having your pet spayed or neutered. Why not avoid these issues before they begin?

The Greater Good

Of course, spaying and neutering, in general, is important for the greater good of animal welfare. Every year, millions of cats go homeless or must be euthanized simply because there are too many. Don’t contribute to pet overpopulation by allowing your cat to breed unchecked.

Does your cat need spayed or neutered? Call your animal hospital Rochester, NY for help.

Helping Your Cat Control Her Hairballs

For most cats, the occasional hairball is a natural part of life. Since cats ingest their own fur while grooming themselves, what doesn’t get excreted in feces gets coughed back up. However, you can do a few things to help your cat’s hairball production go down. Learn more below from your vet Frisco, TX.

Grooming

Brush your cat daily; this removes loose fur from the coat, lessening the amount ingested and regurgitated by your feline friend. Plus, brushing helps to spread essential skin oils through the fur to moisturize the coat naturally, reducing shedding at the outset.

Diet Choice

If your cat isn’t receiving a quality diet, her digestive process may be inhibited. When she eats a high-quality, well-balanced cat food, though, her digestive system works at peak efficiency to help move hair through the digestive tract quickly and smoothly. This results in less hairballs!

Veterinary Visit

If your cat’s hairball production is extremely high or has seemingly increased dramatically in a short period of time, it’s important to get your pet to the vet’s office. Medical issues could be to blame—make an appointment with your animal hospital Frisco, TX to make sure your cat stays healthy and happy.

The Fundamentals of Catnip

Is your feline friend familiar with catnip? It’s our cats’ favorite plant! Here, your veterinarian North Phoenix, AZ tells you all about the basics of catnip.

What Exactly is Catnip?

Catnip is an herb categorized in the same plant “family” as mint. It occurs naturally, having originated on the continent of Europe before being spread all over the world.

In the wild, catnip is a leafy green plant with white flowers. The catnip you’ll buy in a pet store is a processed and dried version of the natural plant, and catnip can also be infused into sprays or included in pet toys.

What Makes Cats Respond to Catnip?

The oils of the catnip plant contain a chemical substance known as nepetalactone. It’s this substance that causes a reaction in your cat’s brain, leading to feelings of euphoria and excitement.

Why Doesn’t My Cat Respond to Catnip?

Cats require a certain gene, inherited from the parents, to respond to nepetalactone. If they don’t possess this gene, catnip won’t cause much of a reaction whatsoever! If your cat doesn’t respond to catnip, don’t worry—they’re perfectly healthy.

Want to know more about Fluffy’s favorite herb? Contact your animal hospital North Phoenix, AZ.

Care Tips for Your Elderly Cat

Is your cat getting along in years? Our aging feline friends need plenty of love and attention, perhaps now more than ever! Below, your vets Carmel, IN gives you three quick tips for keeping Fluffy safe as she gets older.

Appropriate Diet

All senior cats should be eating a specially formulated diet made just for the needs of older felines. After all, their nutritional needs are quite different now than they were many years ago! Ask your veterinarian for a recommendation.

Help With Grooming

It’s possible that your cat can’t twist and turn in order to groom herself in the way that she once could. If your feline friend’s coat is looking dull or dry, help her out in the grooming department with regular brushing sessions.

Veterinary Visits

Now more than ever, your cat should be examined by your veterinarian on a regular basis. He or she can catch any health problems and treat them early on, before they’re allowed to develop into something more serious. Talk to your veterinary professional about setting up regular office visits.

Do you have questions about your senior cat’s healthcare and wellness needs? We’re here for you! Contact your animal hospital Carmel, IN today.

Why Play With Your Cat?

How often do you play with your feline companion? It may surprise you to learn that playtime is a key part of your cat’s care regimen! Learn why below from a Rochester, NY veterinarian:

Exercise

Of course, playtime means that your cat is getting the physical activity she needs. When your cat exercises, she’s burning excess calories to stave off dangerous obesity, while also keeping all body parts healthy and strong.

Mental Stimulation

Just like your body, your cat’s mind needs regular workouts. You don’t want your cat to become bored and unstimulated! This is why it’s a great idea to have your cat play with puzzle toys. You can even try teaching your feline friend tricks and commands, like “come” or “sit!”

Improved Behavior

Another benefit of playing with your cat is that they’ll likely behave a bit better. A cat who remains sedentary and board may start to act out inappropriately. Do your part to avoid inappropriate scratching, loud vocalizations, and other undesirable behaviors—play with your feline friend on a daily basis.

Do you have questions about your cat’s exercise routine? Do you suspect your pet is overweight? We’re here for you! Call your veterinary clinic Rochester, NY.

FAQs on Catnip

Is your feline friend familiar with catnip? We’ve all heard of our cat’s favorite herb, but how much do you really know about it? Here, your Fort Collins, CO veterinarian answers a few frequently asked questions.

What is Catnip?

Catnip is a naturally occurring, leafy green plant grouped in the same plant “family” as mint. It’s originally from Europe, but can now be found all over the world. The catnip you’ll buy in the pet store is a dried and processed version, and it can also be incorporated into sprays or cat toys.

Why Does Catnip Affect Cats?

The oils of the catnip plant contain a chemical called nepetalactone; it’s this substance that affects your cat’s brain chemistry. Experts say it’s almost like an aphrodisiac for cats, eliciting a kind of sexual response!

Why Isn’t My Cat Responding?

Have you tried catnip on your pet without success? Some cats won’t respond to catnip at all, but don’t worry—nothing is wrong with your feline friend! Cats actually need a specific gene, inherited from their parents, to feel catnip’s effects.

Do you have questions about catnip? Does your cat need medical care? Contact your veterinary clinic Fort Collins, CO for help.