Myths About Your Cat

Don’t believe everything you hear about your feline friend! There are many myths and misconceptions about our cats, and they’re simply untrue. Allow your Newmarket, ON veterinarian to set the record straight:

Cats Always Land Upright

This isn’t true. Cats can slip and fall like anyone else, even though they’re often graceful and poised. Veterinarians even have a term referencing cats falling off of high ledges or windowsills: high-rise syndrome. Check all window screens in your home, and don’t let your cat relax on high ledges!

Cats Love Milk

This is a half-truth. Cats might love milk, but it won’t return the service. The truth is that most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning that they can’t digest milk properly. Too much will probably result in vomiting or diarrhea!

Cats Purr When Happy

This is also only half true. Cats do often purr when they’re feeling happy and content, yes. But many experts believe that purring can also indicate a variety of other emotions, such as anger, stress, or fear! You know your cat best, so pay attention to her mannerisms to know what she’s thinking.

Need to make an office appointment for your pet? Contact your veterinarians Newmarket, ON.

Can My Cat Eat Avocado?

Avocado usually appears on lists of foods that aren’t good for pets. It’s true—avocado and guacamole aren’t always safe for pets, but it turns out that they can offer some nutritional value. Let’s take a closer look at the issue as your Rochester, NY tells you more.

Avocado’s Benefits

The fruit of the avocado can provide nutrients to your cats, like vitamins A, E, C, B3 and B6, fiber, magnesium, and potassium. But is avocado worth the risk to get these nutrients? No, because your cat should be getting these nutrients from their regular food!

Avocado’s Risks

The stem, leaves, skin, pit, and fruit of the avocado contain a toxin called persin. It’s because of this poison that avocado is generally considered a bad idea for pets, your cat included. It would take a lot of avocado or guacamole to actually cause problems to your cat, but it’s really not worth the risk!

Can Cats Eat Avocado?

At the end of the day, it’s not worth the risk to feed your cat avocado. Plus, it’s doubtful that your feline friend would decide to eat it anyway!

Call your pet clinic Rochester, NY today for more information on toxic foods.

Lily Toxicity and Your Feline Friend

Lilies are very common flowers, and you might even have them in your home right now. Did you know that lilies are very toxic to cats? Learn more here from a Glendale, AZ veterinarian.

Symptoms of Poisoning

Some lilies only cause minor mouth irritation, while some cause more serious symptoms like loss of appetite, lethargy, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, and—without treatment—seizures and even death. The Easter, tiger, Japanese snow, day, wood, and Stargazer lilies are some of the most common offenders.

Treating Poisoning

A cat who has eaten a lily flower should be taken to the emergency room. Activated charcoal may be given to slow the toxin’s absorption in the gut, or the stomach may be flushed. Fluid replacement therapy, oxygen supplementation, and other supportive measures might be needed as the patient recovers.

Preventing Toxicity 

Prevent lily Toxicity in the first place, rather than dealing with it after the fact. Lilies are common in bouquets and floral arrangements, and can also be planted in landscaping areas—check these areas to make sure you’re not keeping a harmful plant within reach of your cat.

Ready to learn more about lily Toxicity in cats? Contact your animal hospital Glendale, AZ today.

3 Cat Myths

Our feline friends are a little bit mysterious… we can’t always tell just what they’re thinking. Maybe that’s why there are many cat myths floating around! Below, your Sugar Land, TX veterinarian tells you more.

Cats Always Land Upright

This isn’t true. Cats are graceful, but they can slip and fall like anyone else. Cats myths can even fall awkwardly, potentially injuring themselves quite seriously. In your home, make sure your cat can’t get onto high window sills or balconies that she could potentially fall from.

Cats Purr When Happy

This is a half-truth. Cats do purr when they’re feeling contended, yes, but experts think that purring could also indicate a variety of other emotions. Some of them are even negative, like anger or stress!

Cats Love Milk

Your cat might happily love milk, but that doesn’t mean it’s good for her. The truth is that most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning that they can’t properly digest dairy. Too much milk will result in vomiting or diarrhea, so don’t give your cat more than a small serving.

Does your feline friend need a veterinary exam? Do you have more questions about Fluffy’s health or behavior? Contact your vet Sugar Land, TX.

Your Cat’s Hairball Basics

If you own a cat, it’s a safe bet that you deal with the occasional hairball. It’s a part of life for most of our feline friends! How much do you know about your cat’s hairballs, though? Are they dangerous? Find out more here from a Westminster, MD vet.

Why Do Hairballs Form?

When your cat licks herself for grooming, the tongue picks up a lot of loose fur, which your cat swallows. Most of this ingested hair moves through the digestive system and gets expelled in your cat’s fecal matter, but some of it remains in the gut. That hair clumps together in the form of a hairball, which will eventually be regurgitated.

Are Hairballs Safe?

Yes, the occasional hairball is perfectly normal and safe. If your cat is coughing up hairballs frequently, though, see the vet; something could be causing her to shed too much. Also, any cat who is vomiting frequently should be examined by a vet promptly.

How Can I Lessen Hairball Production?

Feed your cat a great diet to minimize shedding, and brush her regularly to remove loose fur. Your feline friend will thank you!

Learn more about hairballs by calling your veterinarian Westminster, MD.

Senior Cat Care Basics

Do you have a senior cat in your household? Our feline friends are considered “seniors” by the time they’re about seven or eight. Here are a few quick tips from a veterinarian Brandon, FL for keeping your older cat in good health.

A Great Diet

Your cat’s nutritional requirements have changed quite a bit since she was a kitten. It’s important that your cat is fed a diet made just for the needs of older felines! Ask your vet to recommend a senior formula that suits your cat’s needs, because nutrition is the foundation for great health.

Special Accommodations

Try placing a litter box on each floor of your home so that your cat doesn’t have to trek up and down the staircase to use the bathroom. Make sure litter boxes have low sides so your cat doesn’t struggle to get in. Last but not least, place plenty of soft beds around the home to give your cat plenty of napping spots.

Veterinary Checkups

When your vet checks up on your cat regularly, trouble can be spotted early and treated accordingly. It’s the best way to keep your cat healthy!

Schedule your cat’s appointment at your vet clinic Brandon, FL.

Sphynx Cat Basics

You’ll know a sphynx cat when you see one—their hairless body, bat-like ears, and wide eyes are unmistakable! Read on as your veterinarian Ellicott City, MD tells you more about these fascinating felines.

The Sphynx’s History

Records of hairless cats in North America date back to the early 1900s, but the Sphynx cat that we recognize today originates in 1966. That year in Toronto, Canada, a pair of domestic shorthair cats produced a hairless litter thanks to a random genetic mutation. The hairless cats continued to breed and have been spreading ever since!

Care Needs

For the most part, a Sphynx’s care needs are similar to those of other cats. They will need extra bathing, though, because body oil that would usually be removed by fur tends to build upon the skin. The Sphynx cat can also be sunburned easily, so exposure to direct sunlight must be limited.

Personality of the Sphynx

Sphynxes are friendly, intelligent, and curious cats, and they have high metabolic rates; this means they’re high-energy and will typically love jumping, running, and climbing. All in all, they make wonderful pets!

Learn more about the Sphynx cat by calling your pet clinic Ellicott City MD.

Antioxidants and How They Help Your Cat

You’ve probably heard of antioxidants before—they’re extremely helpful for humans, and are included in many foods. Did you know that antioxidants are also beneficial for your cat? Learn more here from a vet Rochester, NY.

Food Freshness

Antioxidants do what their name suggests: battle oxidation, which occurs when your cat’s food is exposed to oxygen. This process breaks down the nutrients in food over time, eventually spoiling it. Antioxidants slow the oxidation process to keep your feline friend’s food fresh!

Immune System Benefits

Free radicals occur naturally in your cat’s body and are produced in greater numbers when your pet gets sick or is exposed to toxins. Free radicals contain oxygen, so antioxidants are effective for keeping them at bay. In this way, antioxidants are essential for good immune system health.

Anti-Aging Properties

Studies have demonstrated that antioxidants are also effective for combatting the effects of aging in your pet’s brain. They literally keep the brain functioning at a higher level as your pet ages—that’s why antioxidants are often included in senior cat food formulas.

Learn more about your cat’s diet, nutrition, and care needs by calling your veterinary clinic Rochester, NY today. We’re always here to help!

Learn More About the Sphynx Cat

It’s safe to say that Sphynx cats are some of the most unique felines out there, with their bat-like ears, wide eyes, and completely hairless bodies. Below, your Roanoke, VA veterinarian tells you more about this cat breed.

The Sphynx’s History

Records of hairless cats in North America date back to the early 1900s, but today’s modern Sphynx cat dates from 1966 in Toronto, Canada. There, a pair of domestic shorthairs produced a hairless litter because of a random genetic fluke, and the Sphynx breed was born. Now, the gene pool of the Sphynx cat is large and stable.

Care Needs

Sphynx’s care requirements are largely the same as other cats, but they do need some extra attention when it comes to the skin. Sun exposure must be limited, as they can get sunburnt easily, and they’ll need frequent baths. That’s because, without fur, excess body oil doesn’t get removed from the surface of their skin.

The Sphynx’s Temperament

Sphynxes are high-energy cats with hearty metabolisms, and they’re generally friendly, intelligent, and amusing animals. They make great pets for almost any family, including those with children!

Want to learn more about the Sphynx cat? Call your vet clinic Roanoke, VA.

Why Your Cat Is Ignoring Her Litter Box

Litter box aversions aren’t uncommon amongst our feline friends! If your cat has seemingly given up on using her powder room, it’s time to make a change. Here, your veterinarian Washington DC tells you why your cat might be avoiding her bathroom and what to do about it.

Cleanliness

Cats don’t like to use a dirty bathroom; who can blame them? If you don’t clean out your cat’s litter box often enough, she might avoid it entirely. Scoop out the box on a daily basis, and change the litter entirely about once a week or so.

Placement

Did you know that it’s very important where your cat’s bathroom is located? Much like humans, cats prefer to do their business in an area where they won’t be disturbed. Place your cat’s box in a quiet, low-key area of the house where she can use it in peace. In most homes, a laundry room, basement, or bathroom works well.

Medical Concerns

Of course, it’s possible that medical concerns—injury, infection, and much more—could be the root cause of your cat’s aversion to her litter box. Contact your vet clinic Washington DC right away if you think this might be the case.