Care Tips for Your Aging Cat

Is your cat getting along in years? It’s important to keep your senior feline friend’s health and well-being in mind. That way, their golden years will be their best yet! Learn more here from a veterinarian London, ON.

Proper Diet

The nutritional requirements of a senior cat are much different than a kitten’s. That’s why it’s imperative that your aging companion is eating a specially formulated diet made just for the needs of senior felines! Consult your vet for a recommendation on a great choice, and be sure to ask about the proper serving size.

Light Exercise

Don’t let your senior cat lay around all day; that’s a quick path to dangerous obesity. Make sure Fluffy gets moving every day for some light exercise. Use a favourite toy or a laser light pointer so that your cat can burn off some excess calories.

Veterinary Checkups

Now more than ever, your cat should be examined frequently by the veterinarian. Health troubles can sneak up on your cat quickly, and it’s best to have them addressed early.

Do you need to schedule an appointment for your feline friend? Have further questions about caring for a senior cat? Contact your vet London, ON.

Everything You Need to Know About the Sphynx Cat

The Sphynx cat conjures up thoughts of the ancient Egyptians and exotic adventures… how much do you really know about this fascinating feline? Learn more about the Sphynx in this article from a Lafayette, LA veterinarian.

History

Records of hairless cats date back as far as the early 1900s, but the Sphynx that we know of today can be dated more precisely to 1966. It was then, in Toronto, Canada, that a pair of domestic shorthairs produced a hairless litter because of a random genetic mutation. The Sphynx has been spreading ever since, and can now be found in various parts of the world!

Temperament and Personality

Sphynxes are high-energy cats, thanks to their hearty appetites and high metabolisms. A Sphynx will love jumping, running, and climbing, and they tend to be friendly, inquisitive, and intelligent animals. They’re a great cat for almost any family!

Care Requirements

Most of the Sphynx’s care needs are similar to that of other cats, save for one: their hairless body. A Sphynx will need regular baths to remove excess body oil that isn’t absorbed by fur. Sun protection is also extremely important!

Want to know more about Sphynx cats? Call your vet Lafayette, LA.

Grooming Tips for Cat Owners

Your cat is quite good at grooming herself. That doesn’t mean, though, that she can’t use a little hand every once in a while! Here are three grooming tips for cats from a vet London, ON.

Quality Diet

Our first tip doesn’t really have anything to do with grooming at all. Feeding your cat a great diet that’s properly suited to her age and weight, though, is one of the best things you can do for Fluffy’s coat of fur! When your cat receives the right nutrients through her food, the hair follicles and skin stays healthy, leading to a great quality coat.

Brushing

Brush your cat regularly. This helps keep the coat smooth and shiny, and it traps a lot of loose fur in the brush itself. That does two things: keeps your home cleaner, and helps cut down on hairballs since your cat isn’t swallowing as much of her own hair!

Health Check

Use grooming time as an opportunity for a topical health check. Run your hands over your cat’s body and take note of any wounds, lumps, or anything else abnormal.

Tell your veterinarian London, ON right away if you find something amiss. We’re here to help!

Saving Money on Your Cat’s Care

Wouldn’t it be nice to save a little money here and there when it comes to your cat? Of course, you don’t want to affect their health in the least. Learn about three great ways to do just that from your veterinarians Rochester, NY.

Preventative Medicine

Preventative care isn’t just more effective than treating a health problem after the fact; it’s much cheaper. The costs of monthly pest preventatives and essential vaccinations are far less than the costs associated with expensive veterinary procedures and treatment medicines. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure!

Portion Control

Don’t overfeed Fluffy. It wastes food, meaning you’ll have to purchase more before you really should have to. Secondly, overfeeding contributes to obesity, which will be costly and time-consuming down the road. Obesity can also lead to a host of other health problems that are expensive to treat. Ask your vet for a recommendation on your cat’s portion size.

Adoption

Adopt your cat from a shelter—you’ll be saving a life in need and saving money! Adoption fees are almost always far less than price tags at pet stores.

To learn more about your cat’s care needs, contact your animal hospital Rochester, NY.

Kitten Care Tips

Are you thinking of bringing home a kitten in the near future? Kittens make wonderful pets and will grow into beautiful adult cats who provide years of joy and companionship. Here, your veterinarian Lafayette, LA provides a few important kitten care tips.

Diet

Newborn kittens require the mother’s milk, or a synthetic substitute product, for proper growth in the early stages of life. Eventually, they’ll be transitioned to a wet kitten food once they’re ready to start eating solids. Ask your vet for help with your kitten’s diet during this crucial period.

Safety

Before bringing your pet home, examine your home for potential hazards and remove the danger. Kittens are quite mischievous! Remove hazardous chemicals, poisonous plants, sharp objects, small items that could be choked on, and dangerous food.

Veterinary Care

Don’t forget that your kitten will require vaccinations, pest-control medicines, and regular checkups at the vet’s office. Call your veterinary clinic today to set up a schedule for your kitten’s first years—it will be well worth the effort!

Does your new companion need an initial checkup? Would you like help with your kitten’s behavior or healthcare needs? Call your vet in Lafayette, LA to set up an appointment.

Cat Hairballs 101

Have you ever seen your cat produce a hairball? It’s certainly unpleasant, but can it do your cat any harm? Below, your veterinarian Aurora, CO tells you everything you need to know about hairballs.

Why Do Hairballs Form?

Tiny barbs on your cat’s tongue pick up loose fur from the coat when your cat grooms herself. Most of this swallowed hair is expelled in the feces after it moves through the digestive tract. Some hair, though, remains in the gut and forms a hairball, which your cat eventually regurgitates.

Are Hairballs Safe for Fluffy?

Yes, the occasional hairball is a part of life for most cats and won’t harm them. However, if your cat is retching and gagging but not producing a hairball, she may have a blocked windpipe. Rush her to the emergency room right away. Also, hairball regurgitation and vomiting are not the same thing—consistent vomiting is an indicator of serious illness!

Can I Make Hairballs Occur Less Often?

Ask your vet about a special diet that may help your cat shed less. Daily grooming with a brush is the best way, though, to help Fluffy produce less hairballs.

To learn more, contact your vets Aurora, CO.

Your Cat and Hairballs

If you own a cat, the occasional hairball is probably a part of life. These regurgitations by your cat are certainly unpleasant… how much do you really know about them? Here, your vets Savannah, GA goes over the basics of hairballs.

What Causes Hairballs?

When your feline friend grooms herself, tiny barbs on her tongue pick up hair, which your cat swallows. Most of the swallowed hair passes through the digestive tract and is expelled through the feces; that which isn’t, though, clumps together into a hairball. Eventually, that hair gets regurgitated!

Are Hairballs Safe for My Cat?

Yes—the occasional hairball is a natural part of life and shouldn’t cause your feline friend any harm. Frequent hairball production, though, could mean a health issue; you’ll want to have your cat examined if your cat is producing a lot of hairballs. If your cat is gagging and retching without producing a hairball, take them to the emergency room.

Can I Minimize Hairball Production?

Grooming Fluffy yourself will prevent her from swallowing excessive amounts of hair. Additionally, specialized diets or dietary supplements can help cats who are particularly prone to high hairball production.

Call your veterinarians Savannah, GA to learn more.

Dangerous Plants and Flowers for Cats

There are plenty of harmful plants and flowers out there for our feline friends. It’s important to know what to look out for! Here, your Rochester, NY veterinary professional tells you about three of the most common offenders.

Lilies

Did you know that many varieties of lilies are toxic for cats? Day lilies, Easter lilies, and tiger lilies are just a few examples. Symptoms like drooling, lethargy, vomiting, and diarrhea could result if your cat eats lilies—keep your feline friend away!

The Sago Palm

The sago palm is highly toxic for pets, your cat included. Bleeding disorders, liver failure, vomiting, diarrhea, and more could be caused by ingestion! The sago palm may be found outdoors or indoors; if your cat ingests any part of the plant, take them to the vet’s office right away.

Rhododendron/Azalea

The rhododendron plant, also called azalea, can cause symptoms like irritation in the mouth, vomiting, and diarrhea after only a few leaves are ingested. Without treatment, blood-pressure drops and even coma could occur! Don’t keep these common houseplants in your cat’s living area.

Want more advice on keeping your cat safe from toxic plants? Call your animal hospital Rochester, NY to make an appointment.

Can I Give My Cat Milk?

Cats and milk seem to make a good match. Did you know that they actually don’t mix well? Your veterinarian Wake Forest, NC veterinarian tells you more below:

Why Isn’t Milk Good for Cats?

Most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning that they can’t digest milk properly. Many humans suffer from this same condition! If your cat ingests a lot of milk, they’re likely to experience an upset stomach, vomiting, or diarrhea.

Don’t Kittens Need Milk?

Yes, kittens will need the mother’s milk (or a substitute milk if the mother isn’t around) during the early nursing stage to grow properly. As they get older, though, they produce less and less lactase in the gut, meaning they can’t digest lactose as well. By the time a kitten has grown into an adult cat, milk probably won’t do them much good!

How About Other Dairy Foods?

Other kinds of dairy like cheese and yogurt either contain less lactose or are pasteurized, meaning that microscopic organisms have already removed much of the lactose. As such, these foods are a bit safer for cats. Still, they’re not nutritionally necessary at all!

Want to know more about your cat’s dietary needs? Contact your vet Wake Forest, NC.

Three Preventative Healthcare Essentials for Your Cat

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure—this old adage couldn’t be more true than when it comes to your feline friend’s health! Here, your veterinarian Los Gatos, CA tells you about three key elements of preventative healthcare for your cat.

Vaccination

Cats require the core vaccinations to protect against diseases like feline leukemia, feline hepatitis, calicivirus, influenza, and others. It’s far more difficult to treat and eradicate these diseases after they’ve taken hold than it is to avoid them initially! Talk to your vet if your cat needs vaccinated.

Pest Control

Don’t let fleas, ticks, or worms afflict your beloved pet. Keep your cat on the proper preventatives to ward off these pesky critters. Make no mistake; even indoor cats are prone to infection and infestation by pests! Your veterinarian can set your cat up with the medications she needs.

Quality Diet

Feeding your cat a quality diet is one of the easiest ways to keep her healthy long-term. Make sure Fluffy is getting an age-appropriate food with all of the essential nutrients.

Want a recommendation on a great cat food choice? Contact your animal hospital Los Gatos, CA today to set up an office appointment.