Can I Give My Cat Milk?

Cats and milk seem to make a good match. Did you know that they actually don’t mix well? Your veterinarian Wake Forest, NC veterinarian tells you more below:

Why Isn’t Milk Good for Cats?

Most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning that they can’t digest milk properly. Many humans suffer from this same condition! If your cat ingests a lot of milk, they’re likely to experience an upset stomach, vomiting, or diarrhea.

Don’t Kittens Need Milk?

Yes, kittens will need the mother’s milk (or a substitute milk if the mother isn’t around) during the early nursing stage to grow properly. As they get older, though, they produce less and less lactase in the gut, meaning they can’t digest lactose as well. By the time a kitten has grown into an adult cat, milk probably won’t do them much good!

How About Other Dairy Foods?

Other kinds of dairy like cheese and yogurt either contain less lactose or are pasteurized, meaning that microscopic organisms have already removed much of the lactose. As such, these foods are a bit safer for cats. Still, they’re not nutritionally necessary at all!

Want to know more about your cat’s dietary needs? Contact your vet Wake Forest, NC.

Three Preventative Healthcare Essentials for Your Cat

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure—this old adage couldn’t be more true than when it comes to your feline friend’s health! Here, your veterinarian Los Gatos, CA tells you about three key elements of preventative healthcare for your cat.


Cats require the core vaccinations to protect against diseases like feline leukemia, feline hepatitis, calicivirus, influenza, and others. It’s far more difficult to treat and eradicate these diseases after they’ve taken hold than it is to avoid them initially! Talk to your vet if your cat needs vaccinated.

Pest Control

Don’t let fleas, ticks, or worms afflict your beloved pet. Keep your cat on the proper preventatives to ward off these pesky critters. Make no mistake; even indoor cats are prone to infection and infestation by pests! Your veterinarian can set your cat up with the medications she needs.

Quality Diet

Feeding your cat a quality diet is one of the easiest ways to keep her healthy long-term. Make sure Fluffy is getting an age-appropriate food with all of the essential nutrients.

Want a recommendation on a great cat food choice? Contact your animal hospital Los Gatos, CA today to set up an office appointment.

Explaining Your Cat’s Kneading

You’ve probably seen your cat knead—it’s when your cat presses the front paws into a soft object before lying down. Have you ever wondered why Fluffy does this? Your vet Marietta, GA fills you in on a few possibilities below:

Napping Prep

You’ve likely seen your cat knead before bedding down for a nap. It’s believed that our cats’ ancestors kneaded grass or dirt surfaces in the wild, preparing them as a bedding spot for themselves or their offspring. This behavior may have gotten passed down to our domesticated felines!

Territory Marking

Your cat’s paw pads contain scent glands, and scents are released when your cat kneads. It may be her way of marking her territory—that territory might be a pillow, a pet bed, or your leg!

Nursing Instinct

Did you know that kittens often knead their mother’s belly during the nursing period to stimulate milk production? Adult cats may knead as a sort of “remnant” behavior from kitten-hood, and they may even associate the action with the feelings of contentment they felt while nursing!

Want more information on your cat’s behavior? We’re here for you. Call your veterinarian Marietta, GA today to learn more about your pet.

Common Cat Toxins

Although dogs are often more likely to gobble up whatever substance is in front of them, putting them at a somewhat greater risk for poisoning, cats are also susceptible! Here, your vet Aurora, CO tells you about some of the most common cat toxins to be aware of.

Poisonous Plants

Plenty of plants and flowers aren’t safe for cats, and they’re some of the most common toxins since our feline friends often like to munch on vegetation. Lilies are particularly poisonous, and other plants like dieffenbachia, elephant ear, certain aloe plants, rhododendron, and more can also pose a serious risk. Keep your cat away!

Human Foods

Garlic, onions, grapes and raisins, chocolate, candy, gum, alcohol… the list of potentially harmful foods is quite long! Don’t leave dangerous foods out on countertops; you know how easy it is for cats to leap up and start exploring!


Antifreeze is a particular problem during the winter months; it contains ethylene glycol, a poisonous alcohol substance. The problem is that antifreeze tastes and smells sweet, which may attract your cat! Use antifreeze carefully and clean up spills right away.

For more information on cat toxins, give your pet clinic Aurora, CO a call.

How to Help Your Senior Cat Thrive

Do you have an aging cat on your hands? Keep your elderly feline companion healthy and happy so that she enjoys her golden years! Below, your Plano, TX vet offers three easy tips to do just that:

Great Diet

All aging cats should be fed a specially formulated senior diet, which is made with just the right ingredients for your older cat’s nutritional needs. Ask your vet to recommend a great choice, and also be sure to ask about the portion that your cat needs.

Fun Toys

Cats need exercise, even older ones! Provide your companion with plenty of fun toys to let her entertain herself. Catnip toys are always a hit, but even a simple string dangled in front of Fluffy’s face will likely do the trick! Try to get your pet moving on a daily basis to help stave off obesity.

Napping Spots

Cats always love napping; your senior companion probably sleeps now more than ever! Make sure she has plenty of soft, warm beds to relax in throughout her golden years.

Does your senior cat need veterinary care? We’re here to help with all of your pet-care needs. Make an appointment at your animal hospital Plano TX.

Your Cat’s Hairballs

Hairballs are a part of life for most cat owners. Have you ever wondered what causes these unsightly expulsions, and if they are a problem? Learn more here as your Sugar Land, TX veterinarian fills you in.

What Causes Hairballs?

A cat naturally ingests some hair while grooming herself, thanks to tiny barbs on her tongue. Most of this hair passes through the digestive tract and is expelled in the feces, but some remains in the stomach and is eventually regurgitated in the form of a hairball.

Are Hairballs Safe?

The occasional hairball won’t cause your cat any harm; it’s a normal part of your cat’s life. However, if hairballs are becoming frequent or if they’ve suddenly started appearing more than normal, it’s worth a visit to the vet’s office. If your cat is retching and gagging but not actually producing a hairball, let your vet know.

How Can I Reduce Hairballs?

Ask your vet about a high-fiber “hairball formula” diet; these are made to help your cat shed less and move hair through the system more smoothly. Grooming your cat is also helpful since you’re trapping fur in your brush!

For more information, contact your vet Sugar Land, TX.

Pest Control for Your Cat

All cats, even those that stay indoors, need proper pest control. Pests can get indoors on humans or other pets, potentially causing your feline friend harm. Here, your Rochester, NY veterinarian goes over the basics of good pest control for cats.

Fleas and Ticks

A seasonal or year-round preventative is essential for warding off fleas and ticks, which can cause serious infestations and disease. The preventative may come in a chewable form or be administered topically. Never use a flea-and-tick preventative designed for dogs or other animals—this can prove very dangerous!


Heartworms, roundworms, and other worm varieties can infest your cat and start causing harm. A heartworm preventative will protect your cat from virtually all dangerous worm pests, so talk to your vet about getting Fluffy set up with a great heartworm medication to keep her safe throughout life.


If your cat already has worms, fleas, or ticks, the infestation must be eradicated before a preventative can be administered. Giving a preventative while a cat is infested can prove deadly! If your cat is demonstrating adverse health symptoms and you think a parasite may be to blame, set up an appointment with your animal hospital Rochester, NY.

Your Cat and Kneading

You’ve probably seen your cat knead at least a few times—that’s when your cat presses their front paws into an object in a repeated fashion. There are several possible reasons why cats do this! Learn more below from a Savannah, GA veterinarian.

Preparing for Naps

It’s thought that the ancient ancestors of our domesticated cats kneaded grass and dirt surfaces in the wild, softening them up for naps. That may be why your cat often kneads before bedding down for a snooze!

Territory Marking

Kneading may also be a form of territory marking. Your cat’s paw pads contain scent glands, and the scents are released when your cat’s paw presses into something. Kneading may be your cat’s way of marking her spot as her own.

Nursing Instincts

Kittens often knead their mother’s belly while nursing. This is thought to help stimulate milk production in the mother. Kneading may be a sort of “remnant” behavior left over from kitten-hood; it’s even possible that adult cats associate kneading with feelings of contentment that they experienced during their younger years!

Would you like further insight into your feline friend’s unique behavior? We’re here to help. Contact your veterinary Savannah, GA today.

Dental Health Tips for Cats

It’s easy to overlook dental health when it comes to our feline companions. It’s one of the most important parts of your cat’s healthcare regimen! Use these tips from a Moorpark, CA veterinarian to make sure your pet’s mouth stays in tip-top shape.

Dental Chews

Ask your vet to recommend a great type of dental chew for your cat. These products give your cat’s teeth and gums a healthy workout while helping to scrape away some of the loose plaque on Fluffy’s outer tooth surfaces. Bonus: they also help to freshen the breath!

Quality Diet and Fresh Water

One of the simplest ways to ensure that your cat’s mouth stays in peak condition is to feed them a high-quality diet. This means that they’re receiving the right nutrients for strong gums and teeth. It’s also important to provide your pet with a steady supply of clean, fresh water to wash away grime.

See Your Vet

Don’t forget that regular dental check-ups and teeth cleanings at your vet’s office are essential for your cat’s dental health. Professional cleanings are the best way to keep the teeth and gums in perfect shape!

Schedule an appointment at your vet Moorpark, CA today.

How to Cut Down Your Cat’s Hairball Production

Since cats ingest a bit of hair every time that they groom themselves, some hairballs are a natural part of life for our feline friends. There are a few ways you can cut down on the amount of hairballs your pet produces, though! Learn more here from a Glendale, AZ veterinarian.


By running a brush through your cat’s coat on a daily basis, you’re trapping a lot of the loose and dead hair from her coat in the brush itself. This prevents her from ingesting it, ultimately reducing hairball production. Ask your vet to recommend a good brush type for your cat’s fur.

Diet Changes

If your cat isn’t receiving the right balance of vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients from her food, her digestive health might suffer, meaning that hair doesn’t move through the digestive tract as easily. This causes hair to be regurgitated in the form of a hairball rather than come out in the feces. Talk to your vet for a recommendation on a great diet.

See the Vet

If your cat’s hairballs are becoming a problem, see your vet for advice. It’s even possible that medical issues are to blame! Call your veterinarian Glendale AZ today.