Meet the Special Sphynx Cat

Sphynx cats are quite memorable, mostly thanks to their hairless bodies, wide eyes, and huge bat-like ears. Regardless of their appearance, they make great pets! Learn more about the Sphynx in this article from a pet clinic Ashburn, VA.

History of the Sphynx Cat

Today’s Sphynx hails from the 1960s in Toronto, Canada. There, a pair of domestic shorthaired cats produced a hairless litter, simply thanks to a random gene mutation. The Sphynx has been breeding ever since, and now enjoys a wide, stable gene pool. 

The Sphynx’s Personality

Sphynx cats have high metabolisms, so they’re high-energy, playful, engaging pets. They’re intelligent, inquisitive creatures who love to interact with their human compatriots. All in all, they make wonderful pets for just about every family, including those with young children. 

Care Needs of the Sphynx 

For the most part, caring for a Sphynx cat is just like caring for any cat. However, they’ll need frequent bathing because their body oil tends to build upon the skin since it’s not soaked up by fur. Sphynxes also need extra care in the sun, because they can be easily sunburnt. 

Learn more about the Sphynx cat by contacting your veterinary clinic Ashburn, VA today.

Why Do Cats Have Whiskers?

No matter what kind of cat you have, they have whiskers sprouting from their face. It’s part of being a cat! What do whiskers do, though? Your veterinarians London, ON fills you in below. 

What Whiskers Do

Because of the nerve cluster at the base of each of your cat’s whiskers, they’re very powerful sensory organs for your pet. They help your cat determine the location, size, and texture of objects and surfaces around her, and they can even detect changes in air currents. Your cat uses this kind of “sixth sense” to paint an accurate picture of the world that surrounds her. 

Mood Indication

Did you know that your cat’s whisker position can be an indicator of her mood? The “normal” position means that your cat’s whiskers are sticking straight out from her face, and it indicates that your cat is feeling calm. If the whiskers are pulled back sharply across the cheeks, though, Fluffy is alarmed!  

Trimming Whiskers: A Big No-No

Never trim your cat’s whiskers. It would be like taking away one of your senses, and it could make your cat extremely disoriented.

For more information, call your animal hospital London, ON. We’re always here to help! 

What to Know About the Sphynx Cat

If you’ve seen a Sphynx cat in person, you probably remember the experience. They’re unique pets and are characterized by their completely hairless bodies, wide-set eyes, and bat-like ears. In this article from a vet Portland, OR, learn more about this fascinating cat breed.

History of the Sphynx

Today’s Sphynx cat originated in Toronto, Canada, in the 1960s. A pair of domestic shorthair cats there produced a hairless litter because of a random genetic mutation, and the Sphynx has been populating ever since. Today, the breed enjoys a large gene pool and these cats can be found almost anywhere. 

The Sphynx’s Temperament

Sphynxes tend to have a high metabolic rate, so they’re high-energy active cats. They’re very friendly, intelligent, and inquisitive, and generally make great pets for most families. They’re also good with children! 

Sphynx’s Care Needs

For the most part, a Sphynx cat’s care needs are the same as any other cat. However, they’ll need frequent baths to get rid of excess body oil that isn’t soaked up by fur, and they must avoid sun exposure so that they don’t get burnt.

Learn more about Sphynx cats by calling your vet clinic Portland, OR. We’re here for you!

Can a Cat Get Poison Ivy?

The red, itchy rash of poison ivy is definitely annoying for you. The question is, can your cat suffer that same rash? The answer is yes, although it’s not very common. Your vets Rochester, NY tells you more about poison ivy and cats in this article. 

Symptoms

A cat is most likely to experience poison rashes on areas that aren’t completely covered by furs, such as the paws or face area. The red, itchy rash could develop into blistering and swelling if left untreated. 

Treating Poison Rashes

If you think your cat is suffering from a poison ivy rash, let your vet know. Most cats can be bathed in medicated shampoo or oatmeal shampoo in order to remove the irritating substance, urushiol, from the skin, and allow the rash to heal. 

Preventing the Problem

It’s easier to prevent poison ivy rashes in the first place. Remember the rhyme “leaves of three, leave them be.” Keep an eye out for three-leaved, shiny plants if your cat goes outdoors. And keeping your cat indoors entirely is a good way to make sure your cat doesn’t come in contact with anything harmful.

For more advice, call your veterinary clinic Rochester, NY right away.

Understanding Your Cats Whiskers

When was the last time you thought about your cats whiskers? It’s something that’s easy to forget about, but your cat’s whiskers are very important. Learn more about these essential hairs in this article from a vet Marietta, GA.

What Do Whiskers Do?

Whiskers have a cluster of nerves at their base, making them powerful and sensitive sensory organs. Your cat uses them to detect changes in air currents, as well as determine the size, shape, location, and texture of objects in her environment. All of this helps your cat’s brain to paint a picture of her surroundings, coupled with other senses like sight and smell.

Do Whiskers Indicate My Cat’s Mood?

If your cat’s whiskers are sticking straight out from her face, as they usually are, she’s feeling calm and normal. When the whiskers get pulled back across the face, your cat is probably alarmed or frightened.

Should I Trim Fluffy’s Whiskers?

No! you should never trim a cat’s whiskers, as it would be like taking away an entire sense for them. Cats can become extremely disoriented, so make sure never to trim the whiskers.

Do you have questions about your cat’s health? Connect with your pet clinic Marietta, GA.

Why Isn’t My Cat Using Her Box?

Is your feline companion seemingly not using her litter box the way she should? It’s something that affects nearly one in every 10 cats, so you’re not alone. There are many possible reasons for this behavior—learn more here from a veterinarian Cincinnati, OH.

Poor Placement

Your cat is picky about where her bathroom is located. She doesn’t want to be disturbed while using it, so put it in a quiet, out-of-the-way location in the house. And make sure it’s easily accessible at all times, even when you’re not home.

Not Clean Enough

Who wants to use a dirty bathroom? Not your cat, that’s for sure! Clean the box regularly to make sure it stays perfectly fresh for your animal friend. Cats have been known to shun their bathroom entirely if it becomes too dirty.

Medical Issues

Of course, it’s possible that a medical concern—a urinary tract infection, physical injury, infection, and much more—could be causing your cat to eliminate on your floors. It’s time to see the vet if you can’t determine another cause for your cat’s poor litter box behavior.

Set up your cat’s appointment at your animal hospital Cincinnati, OH. We’re always here to help!

3 Cat Myths That Just Aren’t True

It’s a safe bet that you’ve heard a myth or two about cats, even if you didn’t know it was a myth. Our feline friends are pretty mysterious! But it’s important that you don’t believe everything you hear. Learn more here as your vet clinic Wichita, KS sets the record straight.

Cats Always Land Upright

This isn’t true. Cats are graceful and often land on their feet, yes, but that doesn’t mean they’re infallible. Cats can actually injure themselves from falling, especially if the fall is shorter and the cat doesn’t have time to right themselves before impact.

Cats Love Milk

This is only half-true: Cats might love milk, but it isn’t good for them. Most adult cats are actually lactose-intolerant, meaning they can’t digest the main enzyme of milk. A cat who drinks milk will probably experience an upset stomach, vomiting, or diarrhea!

Cats Purr When They’re Happy

Another half-truth! Cats do purr when they’re feeling content, yes, but experts believe that purring can also indicate other emotions—that includes negative feelings like anxiety and anger.

Your veterinary clinic Wichita, KS is here for all of your cat’s health needs. Call the office today to make your cat’s next appointment!

All About Fluffy’s Whiskers

All of our feline companions have whiskers coming out of their face. Have you ever wondered to yourself what whiskers do, exactly? You may be surprised to find that they’re an essential part of your cat’s anatomy. Learn more here from a pet clinic Washington DC.

What Do Whiskers Do?

Each of your cat’s whiskers have a cluster of nerves at the base, making them powerful sensory organs. They detect air-current changes and help Fluffy to determine the size, placement, and texture of objects around her. In essence, whiskers send a “picture” to your cat’s brain of the world around her, along with her eyes and other sense.

Can Whiskers Indicate My Cat’s Mood?

Yes. When your cat’s whiskers are sticking sideways out of her face like normal, she’s content and calm. If they’re pulled back across the face, she’s probably alarmed or frightened. Try using your cat’s whisker position as a gauge on her mood.

Should I Trim My Cat’s Whiskers?

No—never trim your cat’s whiskers. It can disorient your pet and cause serious health problems. It would be like having an entire sense removed completely!

To learn more about your cat’s health, call your veterinary clinic Washington DC.

Could I Catch a Disease From My Cat?

The disease has certainly been in the news a lot lately. And it may have you wondering: Can I catch a disease from my cat? The answer is yes, you can catch a disease from Fluffy, but it’s not very likely. Read on as your vet Rochester, NY tells you more.

What Could I Catch From My Cat?

Illnesses that can be transmitted from an animal to a human—and vice versa—are known as zoonotic diseases. Cats could technically give diseases like toxoplasmosis, giardiasis, salmonella, ringworm, and rabies to humans, as well as parasitic infestations caused by things like hookworms and roundworms.

Who is Most At Risk?

People with compromised immune systems, those undergoing radiation or chemotherapy treatments, young children, elderly individuals, and pregnant women are the most at-risk people when it comes to contracting a disease from their cat. But with basic hygiene procedures, the risk is virtually non-existent, even for them.

How Do I Stay Safe?

Don’t handle your cat’s fecal matter directly. Wash your hands regularly, and keep your environment—and your cat’s—clean and sanitary. Last but not least, keep your cat in good health with vaccinations and pest-control products.

Contact your animal hospital Rochester, NY today for more tips.

Why Won’t Fluffy Use Her Litter Box?

Have you been finding that your cat isn’t using her litter box in the same way that she used to? If your cat is eliminating outside of her box, something’s up. Here, your vet Lakewood Ranch, FL tells you about some of the common reasons cats shun their bathrooms so that you can get to the bottom of the issue

It’s Unclean

Who wants to use a dirty bathroom? Not your cat! Our feline friends have been known to shun their litter boxes if they’re not cleaned out often enough. It’s best to scoop out your cat’s waste every day or every other day, and change the litter completely every week or so. This ensures that the box stays fresh

It’s Not Placed Properly

Put the box in a quiet, low-key location where she can go to the bathroom in peace, and make sure it’s easily accessible at all times, including when you’re not home. And don’t put the litter box close to Fluffy’s food and water dishes.

Your Cat is Sick or in Pain

If you still can’t figure out why your cat is avoiding her box, call your animal hospital Lakewood Ranch, FL. Medical issues could be the cause!