How to Exercise Your Indoor Cat

It’s easy for an indoor cat to lay around all day, packing on the pounds and becoming unhealthier as time goes on. It’s up to you to exercise your feline friend! Here are three tips on exercising your indoor cat from a veterinarian Newmarket, ON.

Toys

What better way to get your cat moving than with a few fun toys? Toys let your cat exercise her body while having fun, and they encourage her to use her natural hunting and stalking instincts. Be sure to provide your cat with a few good toys at all times.

Cat Furniture

Cat towers allow your cat to exercise herself, even when you’re not at home, and they give her a high vantage point from which to survey her territory. Many cat towers even come with built-in toys and scratching posts! Browse the selection at your local pet supply store.

Catnip

If you’re having trouble enticing your cat into playing, why not use a bit of catnip? Sprinkle catnip on your cat’s toys or scratching post, and watch her go wild!

Does your cat need veterinary attention? Do you need vaccinations or pest-control medications for your pet? Call your animal hospital Newmarket, ON today.

Chocolate Poisoning in Your Cat

While your cat might not seek out chocolate to eat, it’s not worth the risk. Any cat can ingest something they shouldn’t, especially a curious kitten! Below, your Rochester, NY veterinarian tells you about the symptoms and treatment of chocolate poisoning, as well as how to prevent the issue entirely.

Symptoms

The symptoms of chocolate poisoning in cats includes increased heart rate, rapid breathing, low blood pressure, vomiting and diarrhea, and—without treatment—seizures, coma, and heart failure. Symptoms can vary in severity depending on the type and amount of chocolate ingested.

Treatment

A cat’s stomach may need to be flushed to rid the system of the remaining toxin in the gut. Your veterinarian might put your cat on fluid therapy to help them recover, and a plain diet might need to be given after the fact until your cat is fully healed.

Prevention

Keep chocolate of any kind far out of your cat’s reach—rather than leaving it out on countertops or tables, put chocolate in closed cabinets, containers, or the refrigerator so that no pet has a chance of getting their paws on it.

Want to know more about chocolate toxicity? Contact your Rochester, NY veterinary clinic today.

Learn About Fluffy’s Favorite Plant

If you’ve tried catnip on your feline friend, you’ve probably seen the amusing reactions: cats tend to dart this way and that in an excited manner, and some simply stretch out in a state of bliss. How much do you really know about your cat’s favorite plant? Learn more here from a veterinarian London, ON.

What is Catnip, Anyway?

Catnip is an herb, similar to mint. It grows in the wild, but you’ll purchase a dried, processed version in a pet store. Catnip can also be infused into sprays or included in cat toys.

What Causes the Reaction?

The oils of the catnip plant contain a chemical substance, nepetalactone, that triggers a reaction in your cat’s brain. It’s perfectly harmless, and the effects only last a few minutes or so.

Why Isn’t My Cat Reacting?

Is your cat seemingly unaffected by catnip? Don’t worry—your pet is perfectly healthy. It turns out that cats need a particular gene, inherited from their parents, to experience the chemical reaction caused by nepetalactone. If they don’t have it, catnip won’t do much at all!

Learn more about catnip and your cat’s behavior by calling your animal hospital London, ON.

Giving Your Cat Milk

It’s easy to picture a cat lapping up milk—the two just seem to go hand in hand. However, cats and milk really don’t mix! Here, your Riverbend, ON vet tells you more about your cat, dairy, and milk.

Why Can’t Cats Drink Milk?

It turns out that most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning that they can’t properly digest lactose. If a cat ingests too much milk, they’ll experience an upset stomach at the very least, and are likely to exhibit vomiting or diarrhea.

Don’t Kittens Need Milk?

Yes, kittens require their mother’s milk (or a synthetic substitute) during the early stage of life for proper growth. After that, milk doesn’t need to be a part of the diet. As cats age, they produce less and less lactase in the gut, which allows them to digest lactose. By the time a kitten is grown, they’re most likely lactose-intolerant!

Is Any Dairy Safe?

Dairy foods of any kind—cheese, yogurt, etc.—aren’t nutritionally necessary for cats, and too much could cause problems. A commercially available “cat milk” that has had all lactose removed is a much better idea!

Contact your vet clinic Riverbend, ON to learn more about cats and milk.

Controlling Cat Odors at Home

Our feline friends are very good at keeping themselves clean; as such, they’re typically very low-odor pets. With that being said, cats can sometimes get a bit smelly! Learn more here as your vet Mt. Pleasant, SC tells you how to control cat odors.

The Litterbox

There’s one source of odor that most cat owners have to deal with: the litterbox. If your cat’s box, or your cat herself, is starting to smell, it’s time to clean it out. We recommend scooping out your cat’s box daily, and changing the litter entirely about once a week or so.

Odor Control Products

There are odor control products for vomit, urine, feces, and everything in between. Take a look in your local pet supply shop or retail outlet, and ask your vet to recommend great products. These items can help you deal with cat-specific odors that may come up from time to time.

See the Vet

Does your cat smell particularly bad? Has it seemingly come out of nowhere? Medical issues—parasites, skin infection, and much more—could be to blame! Take your cat to the vet’s office for an examination.

Contact your veterinary clinic Mt. Pleasant, SC to make an appointment.

Care Tips for Your Aging Cat

Is your cat getting along in years? It’s important to keep your senior feline friend’s health and well-being in mind. That way, their golden years will be their best yet! Learn more here from a veterinarian London, ON.

Proper Diet

The nutritional requirements of a senior cat are much different than a kitten’s. That’s why it’s imperative that your aging companion is eating a specially formulated diet made just for the needs of senior felines! Consult your vet for a recommendation on a great choice, and be sure to ask about the proper serving size.

Light Exercise

Don’t let your senior cat lay around all day; that’s a quick path to dangerous obesity. Make sure Fluffy gets moving every day for some light exercise. Use a favourite toy or a laser light pointer so that your cat can burn off some excess calories.

Veterinary Checkups

Now more than ever, your cat should be examined frequently by the veterinarian. Health troubles can sneak up on your cat quickly, and it’s best to have them addressed early.

Do you need to schedule an appointment for your feline friend? Have further questions about caring for a senior cat? Contact your vet London, ON.

Everything You Need to Know About the Sphynx Cat

The Sphynx cat conjures up thoughts of the ancient Egyptians and exotic adventures… how much do you really know about this fascinating feline? Learn more about the Sphynx in this article from a Lafayette, LA veterinarian.

History

Records of hairless cats date back as far as the early 1900s, but the Sphynx that we know of today can be dated more precisely to 1966. It was then, in Toronto, Canada, that a pair of domestic shorthairs produced a hairless litter because of a random genetic mutation. The Sphynx has been spreading ever since, and can now be found in various parts of the world!

Temperament and Personality

Sphynxes are high-energy cats, thanks to their hearty appetites and high metabolisms. A Sphynx will love jumping, running, and climbing, and they tend to be friendly, inquisitive, and intelligent animals. They’re a great cat for almost any family!

Care Requirements

Most of the Sphynx’s care needs are similar to that of other cats, save for one: their hairless body. A Sphynx will need regular baths to remove excess body oil that isn’t absorbed by fur. Sun protection is also extremely important!

Want to know more about Sphynx cats? Call your vet Lafayette, LA.

Grooming Tips for Cat Owners

Your cat is quite good at grooming herself. That doesn’t mean, though, that she can’t use a little hand every once in a while! Here are three grooming tips for cats from a vet London, ON.

Quality Diet

Our first tip doesn’t really have anything to do with grooming at all. Feeding your cat a great diet that’s properly suited to her age and weight, though, is one of the best things you can do for Fluffy’s coat of fur! When your cat receives the right nutrients through her food, the hair follicles and skin stays healthy, leading to a great quality coat.

Brushing

Brush your cat regularly. This helps keep the coat smooth and shiny, and it traps a lot of loose fur in the brush itself. That does two things: keeps your home cleaner, and helps cut down on hairballs since your cat isn’t swallowing as much of her own hair!

Health Check

Use grooming time as an opportunity for a topical health check. Run your hands over your cat’s body and take note of any wounds, lumps, or anything else abnormal.

Tell your veterinarian London, ON right away if you find something amiss. We’re here to help!

Saving Money on Your Cat’s Care

Wouldn’t it be nice to save a little money here and there when it comes to your cat? Of course, you don’t want to affect their health in the least. Learn about three great ways to do just that from your veterinarians Rochester, NY.

Preventative Medicine

Preventative care isn’t just more effective than treating a health problem after the fact; it’s much cheaper. The costs of monthly pest preventatives and essential vaccinations are far less than the costs associated with expensive veterinary procedures and treatment medicines. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure!

Portion Control

Don’t overfeed Fluffy. It wastes food, meaning you’ll have to purchase more before you really should have to. Secondly, overfeeding contributes to obesity, which will be costly and time-consuming down the road. Obesity can also lead to a host of other health problems that are expensive to treat. Ask your vet for a recommendation on your cat’s portion size.

Adoption

Adopt your cat from a shelter—you’ll be saving a life in need and saving money! Adoption fees are almost always far less than price tags at pet stores.

To learn more about your cat’s care needs, contact your animal hospital Rochester, NY.

Kitten Care Tips

Are you thinking of bringing home a kitten in the near future? Kittens make wonderful pets and will grow into beautiful adult cats who provide years of joy and companionship. Here, your veterinarian Lafayette, LA provides a few important kitten care tips.

Diet

Newborn kittens require the mother’s milk, or a synthetic substitute product, for proper growth in the early stages of life. Eventually, they’ll be transitioned to a wet kitten food once they’re ready to start eating solids. Ask your vet for help with your kitten’s diet during this crucial period.

Safety

Before bringing your pet home, examine your home for potential hazards and remove the danger. Kittens are quite mischievous! Remove hazardous chemicals, poisonous plants, sharp objects, small items that could be choked on, and dangerous food.

Veterinary Care

Don’t forget that your kitten will require vaccinations, pest-control medicines, and regular checkups at the vet’s office. Call your veterinary clinic today to set up a schedule for your kitten’s first years—it will be well worth the effort!

Does your new companion need an initial checkup? Would you like help with your kitten’s behavior or healthcare needs? Call your vet in Lafayette, LA to set up an appointment.