Pica in Dogs: What to Do When Your Dog Eats Foreign Objects

Pica means the craving and ingestion of non-food items by your dog. Those items could be almost anything—batteries, fabric, coins, dirt, rocks, and socks, for example! Obviously, this condition can prove very dangerous. Learn more here from a Westminster, MD vet.

Why Does Pica Occur?

A cause isn’t found in every case of pica. When it is, though, it’s generally thought of as either medical or behavioral. Medical pica means that a nutritional deficiency, diabetes, thyroid problem, or some other medical issue is causing your dog to ingest foreign bodies. In a behavioral case, an issue like anxiety is the root cause.

How is it Treated?

A medical case of pica must be dealt with by treating the underlying medical issue. In behavioral cases, it’s not so cut and dry—you might have to remove stressors at home, or hire a professional dog behaviorist, for example, to get to the root of the problem.

What Do I Do if My Dog Eats a Foreign Object?

If you know or suspect that your dog has eaten a foreign object, rush them to the vet’s office. Better safe than sorry!

Call your vets Westminster, MD to learn more about pica.

Can Dogs Eat Avocado?

Avocado frequently appears on lists of dangerous human foods for dogs. And it’s true—avocado isn’t always safe for our canine friends, although it can, in fact, offer some health benefits. Allow your Aurora, CO vet to set the record straight below:

Avocado’s Benefits

The fleshy fruit of the avocado can provide some nutrients to your dog, just like it can to you. Those nutrients include vitamins A, B3 and B6, C, and E, as well as potassium, magnesium, amino acids, antioxidants, folate, and fiber.

The Drawbacks of Avocado

Every part of the avocado plant—including the fruit—contains a level of persin, a toxic agent that can harm dogs. It would take a lot of avocados to actually cause poisoning, though. The bigger danger is the avocado’s pit or seed, which a dog can easily choke on.

Can Dogs Eat Avocado?

Technically, dogs can eat the fruit of the avocado without experiencing harm. But they don’t need avocado as a part of the diet assuming they’re getting the right nutrients from their normal dog food! Overall, feeding your dog avocado isn’t worth the risk.

Want to learn more about your dog’s diet and nutrition? Contact your veterinarian Aurora, CO.

Dental Care for Fido

When was the last time you took a look at your dog’s teeth? Dental care is extremely important for dogs because dental disease is very common––and very dangerous. Use these tips from your Burlington, ON veterinarian to make sure Fido’s pearly whites stay in great shape: 

Brush the Teeth

Brush your dog’s teeth on a regular basis using a canine-formulated toothpaste and a pet toothbrush. Start by simply massaging your dog’s gums with your finger; gross, we know, but it gets your dog used to the brushing sensation. Then, slowly introduce the paste and brush. Work your way around your dog’s whole mouth, then offer a treat for a job well-done. 

Proper Diet and Fresh Water

Feeding your dog the right diet means he’s getting the right nutrients for gum and tooth health. Fresh water helps to flush out the mouth and get rid of leftover food particles, bacteria, and other grime. 

Chew Toys

Chew toys provide hours of fun, but they also help to scrape away some of the loose plaque on Fido’s teeth. That’s a great way to remove it before it hardens into tartar. 

Learn more by calling your animal hospital Burlington, ON. We’re here to help! 

Why Exactly Do Dogs Pant?

If you own a dog, you’ve undoubtedly seen them pant. Have you ever wondered why it is, exactly, that your dogs pant? It turns out that there are several possibilities. Learn more from a Fort Collins, CO veterinarian.

Cooling Themselves Down

Most often, a dog is panting in order to cool themselves down. Since dogs don’t sweat the way we do, they need another method for lowering body temperature. When panting happens, moisture evaporates from the tongue, nasal passages, and lining of the lungs. When the air produced by panting passes over these moist membranes, your dog’s body cools itself.

Panting Because of Stress

Panting may also occur as a reaction to some kind of stressful stimuli, like a thunderstorm or a new pet in the house. When this happens, your dog isn’t panting because of the temperature at all. It’s a natural stress reaction!

Panting Because of Medical Issues

It’s also possible that your dog might be panting because of a medical issue. If you’re concerned about your dog’s panting, it’s better to be safe than sorry. Call your vet right away!

To learn more about your dog’s behavior and health, contact your animal hospital Fort Collins, CO today.

Introducing Two Dogs

Are you about to introduce a new dog to your current canine companion? Perhaps you’re setting up a doggy play date. In either case, it’s important to introduce two dogs properly and safely so that things go smoothly. Here, your Frisco, TX veterinarian gives you a few tips on doing just that.

Prepare a Neutral Territory

Step one is finding a neutral territory for the two dogs to meet. Pick a spot that neither dog has “claimed,” like a public park or a neighbor’s yard, so there is no territorial behavior. Make sure space is safe for the dogs; remove anything they could fight over (toys, bones, food, treats, etc.) as well as sharp objects and other hazards.

Take it Slow

Rule number one when having two dogs meet: take things slow. Let the dogs see each other from afar, then slowly move forward. Don’t let the dogs run-up to each other. Keep them leashed so that you can pull them away from each other if necessary.

Moving Forward

At home, keep separate areas for the dogs moving forward while they get to know each other better.

Need help with your dog’s behavior? Call your animal hospital Frisco, TX.

Help! My Dog is Shedding Too Much

Unless you own one of the few breeds of dog that doesn’t shed fur, you probably deal with some hair around your home. However, sometimes your dog’s shedding can get excessive. Follow these tips from a Crown Point, IN veterinarian if you think your dog’s shedding is out of hand:

Brush Regularly

Brushing your dog’s coat of fur regularly will do wonders for shedding. First of all, it traps much of your dog’s loose fur in the brush itself, preventing it from falling all over your floors and furniture. Secondly, brushing spreads essential skin oils through the coat to moisturize fur naturally, preventing shedding from the get-go.

Upgrade the Diet

Your dog’s diet has a lot to do with the amount of fur he sheds. When Fido isn’t receiving the right nutrients, the coat suffers. It may be time to upgrade your pooch to a high-quality, well-balanced diet! Talk to your vet for a recommendation.

See Your Vet

If you can’t determine why your dog is shedding too much and you can’t make it stop, call your vet. A medical problem, like pests or skin infections, could be the cause!

Schedule your dog’s appointment with your vet Crown Point, IN.

Brushing Fido’s Pearly Whites

Have you looked at your dog’s teeth lately? Dental health is very important for our canine companions because bad oral health can lead to a whole host of other problems. Here, let your Columbia, MD vet tell you how to brush your dog’s pearly whites.

Get Your Supplies

First, gather your supplies in a quiet, well-lit area of your home where you’ll perform Fido’s tooth brushing. You’ll need a pet toothbrush, a canine-formulated toothpaste, and a few tasty dog treats. Now, you’re ready to begin.

Brush

Allow Fido to smell and taste the toothpaste before dabbing a bit on the brush. Peel back your dog’s upper lip to expose the teeth, and begin brushing one section of the mouth. Only focus on the outer tooth surfaces; that’s where plaque tends to accumulate. Finish off the section with one final downward stroke of the brush.

Repeat and Reward

Now, continue around to all sections of your dog’s mouth with the brushing. Try giving your dog a tasty treat after each one so that he remains engaged in the brushing process.

Need help with your dog’s dental care? Want a recommendation on a good dog toothpaste? Call your veterinary clinic Columbia, MD.

Your Dog and Pink Eye

You’ve probably heard of pink eye; it’s relatively common in the human healthcare world. Pink eye can also affect dogs! Learn more below from your London, ON vet.

What Causes Pink Eye?

Pink eye, known medically as conjunctivitis, involves inflammation of the conjunctiva or the tissues around your dog’s eyes. It can occur entirely on its own (primary conjunctivitis), or secondarily to another disease or health issue (secondary conjunctivitis). Common causes include bacterial or viral infections, foreign bodies in the eye, glaucoma, eye trauma, and allergies.

What are the Signs?

The main sign of pink eye is a red and inflamed eye or eyelids. Other symptoms include excessive blinking, pawing at the yes, increased tear production, and eye discharge. Conjunctivitis most often occurs in both eyes simultaneously, although it can affect only one eye at a time.

How Is Pink Eye Treated?

First, your vet will perform a full eye exam. Next, the pink eye will need to be treated depending on what’s causing the issue at its root. In most cases, anti-inflammatory medication can be given to lessen the swelling and redness.

Does your dog need a veterinary exam? We’re here to help. Contact your vet clinic London, ON.

Is Your Dog Shedding Excessively?

Almost all of our canine companions shed their fur. It’s a natural part of life for dogs, but sometimes it can become excessive. If you’re finding buckets of fur around your home, it’s time to address the issue. Learn more here from a vet Washington, DC.

Brush the Coat

One thing you can do daily to help control your dog’s excess shedding is to brush his fur. Running a brush or comb through the coat traps loose hair in the implement itself, preventing it from winding up all over your carpets, furniture, and clothing.

Improve the Diet

Your dog’s diet is directly related to his coat quality. When Fido receives the proper nutrition through his food, the skin and hair stays healthy. When your dog is eating a poor diet, on the other hand, the coat becomes dry, coarse, and dull. Upgrade your dog’s diet and see an almost immediate decrease in shedding!

See Your Vet

Still can’t reign in your dog’s excessive shedding? It’s time to see the vet. Medical issues like parasitic infestation, skin infection, and much more could be the root cause!

Contact your veterinary clinic Washington, DC today to set up your dog’s next office visit.

The Dangers of Marijuana for Dogs

Veterinarians have seen an increase in marijuana ingestion and poisoning in dogs, especially as the drug continues to become legalized in several states. It’s not safe for our canine companions! Here, your veterinarian Frisco, TX tells you all about the dangers of marijuana for dogs.

Can Dogs Get High?

Yes, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana—tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC—affects dogs in a similar way to that of humans. However, it’s important to realize that dogs are much smaller than humans, so small amounts of THC have a much greater effect. Plus, dogs don’t realize what they’re ingesting and won’t be prepared for the effects the way a human is.

What are the Symptoms of Poisoning?

A dog that is exposed to THC may experience incontinence, hypersensitivity to touch and sound, and loss of coordination. “Edibles,” or foods that are made with marijuana as an ingredient, are also dangerous because a dog may ingest a lot of butter, sugar, or fat, which can prove hazardous.

What if My Dog Ingests Marijuana?

Take your dog to the emergency room if they’ve ingested marijuana. Supportive fluids may be given, or vomiting may be induced.

Call your vet clinic Frisco, TX to learn more.