Probiotics for Your Pet

Probiotics are rather common in the world of human healthcare. Did you know that they’re also available for pets? Probiotics can benefit your pet in a variety of ways. Learn more here from a Marietta, GA veterinarian.

What Are Probiotics, Anyway?

Probiotics are beneficial microbes that live in your pet’s small or large intestine. They keep “bad” microbes at bay and help to digest food, manufacture vitamins, and other nutrients, and get rid of harmful pathogens. Probiotics for pets might come in the form of a tablet or capsule or yogurt or kefir. It could also be included in pet food.

What Can Probiotics Do for My Pet?

Probiotics help maintain the proper intestinal microbial balance, so they can be prescribed to help with many kinds of digestive health issues. They can be given to manage or correct infestations or infections, regulate digestion, and even to help lower stress levels.

Does My Pet Need Probiotics?

To be safe, only give your pet a probiotic if it’s been cleared by your veterinarian. That way, you’ll be sure it’s completely safe for your beloved companion.

To learn more about your pet’s nutrition and diet, contact your animal hospital Marietta, GA today.

Chocolate Toxicity and Your Pet

You’re probably aware that chocolate and pets don’t mix. In fact, it’s one of the most dangerous toxins out there for our animal friends! Learn more about chocolate toxicity in dogs and cats as your Ashburn, VA veterinarian fills you in below:

Symptoms

The symptoms of chocolate toxicity include drooling, lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and—without prompt treatment—seizures, coma, and even death. Caffeine and theobromine are the ingredients in chocolate that don’t agree with our pets, and they’re found in all types: dark, semi-sweet, milk, white, powdered, etc.

Treatment

If you know or suspect that your pet has ingested chocolate, rush them to the vet’s office. The stomach may need to be flushed, or activated charcoal may be given to slow the toxin’s absorption in the stomach. As a pet recovers, fluid replacement, oxygen supplementation, and other methods might be needed to stabilize them fully.

Preventing Poisoning

Clearly, it’s worth preventing poisoning before it happens. That means keeping any and all chocolate and sweet treats out of your pet’s reach. Store these items in closed cabinets, containers, or the refrigerator so pets can’t gain access at any time.

Contact your animal hospital Ashburn, VA for more information on chocolate toxicity.

Three Benefits of Pet Microchip Identification

Have you ever considered outfitting your pet with a microchip? It’s the best way to keep your animal friend properly identified throughout life. Learn more about the benefits of microchips from your Murrieta, CA veterinarian:

It’s Cost-Effective

You only have to purchase one microchip for the entirety of your pet’s life, and they aren’t expensive. Even if you move addresses or get a new telephone number, your pet’s contact information can be updated by contacting the microchip manufacturer. Your pet keeps the same chip the whole time!

It’s Secure

Your pet can’t remove their identification when it’s embedded under their skin. That gives you incredible peace of mind. Even if your pet escapes unexpectedly, you know that they remain constantly identified no matter what.

It’s Quick and Painless

The microchip implant procedure only takes a few moments. All your pet feels is a momentary pinch before the whole thing is over. The microchip unit is inserted under your pet’s skin with a specialized hypodermic needle-like device, and it’s virtually risk- and side-effect-free.

Want to learn more about microchips for pets? Contact your animal hospital Murrieta, CA right away. We’re here to help with all of your pet’s care needs!

Pet Vaccination 101

Vaccinating your pet early on in life is one of the best things you’ll ever do for their health and happiness. Preventing dangerous diseases ahead of time is far easier than treating them! Learn about the basics of pet vaccination below from your Savannah, GA veterinarian.

Core Vaccines

All pets need what are called the core vaccines, considered essential for all pets because the diseases they prevent are particularly dangerous and/or contagious. Some examples include the vaccines for distemper, feline leukemia, parvovirus, rabies, Lyme disease, and hepatitis.

Non-Core Vaccines

Non-core vaccines aren’t considered necessary for every pet, but they can help some. They’re administered on a case-by-case basis depending on factors like location, environment, pre-existing health conditions, age, etc. The Bordetella vaccine is one example; it protects against kennel cough, so a pet who will be boarded commonly may benefit from the vaccination.

Vaccination Scheduling

Most vaccines will need booster shots every year or every few years to remain effective. Many pet owners have their companion’s vaccinations updated as necessary at one of their pet’s annual appointments. Talk to your veterinarian for more information on your pet’s vaccination schedule.

Contact your veterinary clinic Savannah, GA to have your pet vaccinated.

Pet Toxins You Have in Your Home

That’s right—you have a few pet toxins in your home already, no matter how conscientious you are about pet safety. When you’re aware of the hazards, you can keep your animal companion safe! Here, your veterinarian London, ON tells you more.

Toxic Foods

All sorts of human foods are dangerous for pets. The list includes chocolate and candy, garlic, onions, chives, leeks, scallions, shallots, grapes and raisins, salty foods, rich or buttery foods, and alcohol, among others. Keep your pet away!

Cleaning Supplies

It’s safe to say that almost any cleaning product shouldn’t be ingested by your pet. Everything from carpet cleaner and furniture polish to household disinfectants and bleach can cause serious harm. Keep cleaning supplies safely locked away in the supply closet where pets can’t reach.

Plants and Flowers

There are plenty of plants and flowers that are toxic to pets, including Amaryllis, dieffenbachia, elephant ear, ivy, oleander, rhododendron (also called azalea), philodendron, the sago palm, lilies, daffodils, tulips, and more. Check your home for common offenders, and remove them so that your pet can’t gain access.

To learn more about pet toxins already in your home, contact your vet London, ON. We’re always here to help!

Understanding Pet Antibiotics

Did you know that antibiotics are very commonly used in veterinary medicine as well as in human healthcare? Below, your vet Roanoke, VA tells you more about antibiotics for our animal friends.

What Do Antibiotics Do for My Pet?

Antibiotics kill bacteria that is in or on your pet’s body. They work by weakening bacteria, interfering with bacteria cells’ ability to repair themselves, or stopping the bacteria from multiplying. Antibiotics do not treat viruses, so an antibiotic wouldn’t be prescribed to a pet suffering from a viral infection unless a secondary bacterial infection has developed.

How Are Antibiotics Given to Pets?

Some antibiotics come in pill or tablet form, while some are given in topical form and get applied directly to your pet’s skin in the form of a gel or ointment. Certain antibiotics must be given with food to improve absorption rates, while others must be given on an empty stomach.

Is There Any Risk of Side Effects?

There is a chance that some pets could experience symptoms like vomiting or diarrhea. Let your vet know right away if your pet doesn’t seem to be responding well to an antibiotic.

Learn more by contacting your veterinary clinic Roanoke, VA.

Heartworm Myths About Your Pet

Heartworm is one of the most dangerous pest infestations that our dogs and cats can suffer from. Heartworms are easily spread by mosquitoes, so the problem is also quite common! Here, your Aurora, CO vet tells you about three heartworm myths you shouldn’t believe:

Heartworm is Only Seasonal

Heartworm tends to be more of a problem in warm weather, yes, but that doesn’t mean it goes away once temperatures start dropping. Heartworm can affect pets in the spring and well into the autumn months, so you must keep your pet on preventatives year-round.

Heartworm Only Affects Dogs

Dogs are the most susceptible pets to heartworm, but it can also affect cats occasionally and is also a danger to ferrets and other pets. Ask your veterinary professional if your pet will benefit from regular heartworm preventative.

Heartworm Isn’t Fatal

This couldn’t be further from the truth. If a heartworm infestation isn’t caught early enough, it can cause serious health problems, including death. Additionally, treating heartworm once it’s taken hold is risky, and pets must be closely monitored until they’ve returned to full health.

Would you like to set your pet up with heartworm preventatives? Contact your veterinary clinic Aurora, CO.

Antioxidants and Their Benefits for Pets

Antioxidants are as important for pets as they are for humans. Below, learn more about this essential part of your pet’s nutrition from a vet in Glendale, AZ.

They Keep Food Fresh

Did you know that antioxidants are important as an ingredient in pet food because they help to keep the food fresh? Antioxidants, as their name implies, battle the oxidation of food, which occurs when food is exposed to oxygen and nutrients are broken down. In this way, antioxidants slow down the oxidation process to keep food nutrient-packed and fresh.

They Combat Aging

Antioxidants are often included in senior pet food formulas. That’s because studies have shown that antioxidants help to keep older pets’ brains functioning at higher levels!

They Boost the Immune System

Free radicals occur naturally in your pet’s immune system and are produced in greater amounts when your pet gets sick, is exposed to toxins, or doesn’t get enough of the right nutrients. Antioxidants fight free radicals, thereby boosting your pet’s immune system to keep them healthy.

If you need more information on your pet’s nutritional needs or food choice, don’t delay. Give your animal hospital Glendale, AZ a call today to speak with the professionals.

Rescue Pet Myths About Cats and Dogs

Unfortunately, there are several myths floating around when it comes to animal shelters and the pets inside of them. Allow your veterinarian Murrieta, CA to tell you the truth—here are three rescue pet myths that you shouldn’t believe:

Rescue Pets Are Old

Think rescue pets are old, unwanted animals? Not true. Pets of almost any age can be found in a shelter; elderly companions, middle-aged pets, and puppies and kittens alike! No matter the age of pet you’re considering, tour your local shelters to find it.

Rescue Pets Are Poorly Behaved

This isn’t true. Pets don’t often come to shelters because of poor behavior; issues like abandonment and uncontrolled breeding are far more common reasons. Most rescue pets are well-behaved or can be easily trained!

Rescue Pets Are Dirty

False! On the contrary, rescue facilities must be kept at a high standard of cleanliness and sanitation to prevent the spread of disease in an area with so many animals housed in close quarters. Shelter pets aren’t dirty!

Have you recently adopted a pet and need to make an appointment for their initial vaccinations and examination? We’re here to help. Set up an office visit at your vet clinic Murrieta, CA.

Xylitol and Its Danger for Your Pet

Have you ever heard of xylitol? It’s a sugar substitute found in many candies, gums, baked goods, and other products, like toothpaste. Xylitol is fine for humans, but very bad for pets! Learn more here from a vet Crown Point, IN.

Symptoms

The symptoms of xylitol can manifest themselves in as little as 30 minutes after your pet ingests something containing the poison. Symptoms include lethargy, uncoordinated movements, loss of appetite, and—without prompt treatment—seizures, coma, and even death. Rush your pet to the emergency room if you know or suspect that they’ve ingested xylitol.

Treatment

Your pet’s stomach may need to be flushed to rid the body of the toxin, and activated charcoal might help slow the absorption rate in body. As a pet recovers, supportive measures like fluid replacement and oxygen supplementation might be necessary.

How to Prevent Poisoning

As is the case with all poisonings, it’s easier to prevent xylitol poisoning than deal with it! Keep chocolate, candies, and all sweets out of your pet’s reach—store them in closed containers, cabinets, or the refrigerator.

Want to learn more about xylitol and other dangerous pet poisons? We’re here for you. Call your veterinarian Crown Point, IN.