Pet Toxins You Have in Your Home

That’s right—you have a few pet toxins in your home already, no matter how conscientious you are about pet safety. When you’re aware of the hazards, you can keep your animal companion safe! Here, your veterinarian London, ON tells you more.

Toxic Foods

All sorts of human foods are dangerous for pets. The list includes chocolate and candy, garlic, onions, chives, leeks, scallions, shallots, grapes and raisins, salty foods, rich or buttery foods, and alcohol, among others. Keep your pet away!

Cleaning Supplies

It’s safe to say that almost any cleaning product shouldn’t be ingested by your pet. Everything from carpet cleaner and furniture polish to household disinfectants and bleach can cause serious harm. Keep cleaning supplies safely locked away in the supply closet where pets can’t reach.

Plants and Flowers

There are plenty of plants and flowers that are toxic to pets, including Amaryllis, dieffenbachia, elephant ear, ivy, oleander, rhododendron (also called azalea), philodendron, the sago palm, lilies, daffodils, tulips, and more. Check your home for common offenders, and remove them so that your pet can’t gain access.

To learn more about pet toxins already in your home, contact your vet London, ON. We’re always here to help!

Understanding Pet Antibiotics

Did you know that antibiotics are very commonly used in veterinary medicine as well as in human healthcare? Below, your vet Roanoke, VA tells you more about antibiotics for our animal friends.

What Do Antibiotics Do for My Pet?

Antibiotics kill bacteria that is in or on your pet’s body. They work by weakening bacteria, interfering with bacteria cells’ ability to repair themselves, or stopping the bacteria from multiplying. Antibiotics do not treat viruses, so an antibiotic wouldn’t be prescribed to a pet suffering from a viral infection unless a secondary bacterial infection has developed.

How Are Antibiotics Given to Pets?

Some antibiotics come in pill or tablet form, while some are given in topical form and get applied directly to your pet’s skin in the form of a gel or ointment. Certain antibiotics must be given with food to improve absorption rates, while others must be given on an empty stomach.

Is There Any Risk of Side Effects?

There is a chance that some pets could experience symptoms like vomiting or diarrhea. Let your vet know right away if your pet doesn’t seem to be responding well to an antibiotic.

Learn more by contacting your veterinary clinic Roanoke, VA.

Heartworm Myths About Your Pet

Heartworm is one of the most dangerous pest infestations that our dogs and cats can suffer from. Heartworms are easily spread by mosquitoes, so the problem is also quite common! Here, your Aurora, CO vet tells you about three heartworm myths you shouldn’t believe:

Heartworm is Only Seasonal

Heartworm tends to be more of a problem in warm weather, yes, but that doesn’t mean it goes away once temperatures start dropping. Heartworm can affect pets in the spring and well into the autumn months, so you must keep your pet on preventatives year-round.

Heartworm Only Affects Dogs

Dogs are the most susceptible pets to heartworm, but it can also affect cats occasionally and is also a danger to ferrets and other pets. Ask your veterinary professional if your pet will benefit from regular heartworm preventative.

Heartworm Isn’t Fatal

This couldn’t be further from the truth. If a heartworm infestation isn’t caught early enough, it can cause serious health problems, including death. Additionally, treating heartworm once it’s taken hold is risky, and pets must be closely monitored until they’ve returned to full health.

Would you like to set your pet up with heartworm preventatives? Contact your veterinary clinic Aurora, CO.

Antioxidants and Their Benefits for Pets

Antioxidants are as important for pets as they are for humans. Below, learn more about this essential part of your pet’s nutrition from a vet in Glendale, AZ.

They Keep Food Fresh

Did you know that antioxidants are important as an ingredient in pet food because they help to keep the food fresh? Antioxidants, as their name implies, battle the oxidation of food, which occurs when food is exposed to oxygen and nutrients are broken down. In this way, antioxidants slow down the oxidation process to keep food nutrient-packed and fresh.

They Combat Aging

Antioxidants are often included in senior pet food formulas. That’s because studies have shown that antioxidants help to keep older pets’ brains functioning at higher levels!

They Boost the Immune System

Free radicals occur naturally in your pet’s immune system and are produced in greater amounts when your pet gets sick, is exposed to toxins, or doesn’t get enough of the right nutrients. Antioxidants fight free radicals, thereby boosting your pet’s immune system to keep them healthy.

If you need more information on your pet’s nutritional needs or food choice, don’t delay. Give your animal hospital Glendale, AZ a call today to speak with the professionals.

Rescue Pet Myths About Cats and Dogs

Unfortunately, there are several myths floating around when it comes to animal shelters and the pets inside of them. Allow your veterinarian Murrieta, CA to tell you the truth—here are three rescue pet myths that you shouldn’t believe:

Rescue Pets Are Old

Think rescue pets are old, unwanted animals? Not true. Pets of almost any age can be found in a shelter; elderly companions, middle-aged pets, and puppies and kittens alike! No matter the age of pet you’re considering, tour your local shelters to find it.

Rescue Pets Are Poorly Behaved

This isn’t true. Pets don’t often come to shelters because of poor behavior; issues like abandonment and uncontrolled breeding are far more common reasons. Most rescue pets are well-behaved or can be easily trained!

Rescue Pets Are Dirty

False! On the contrary, rescue facilities must be kept at a high standard of cleanliness and sanitation to prevent the spread of disease in an area with so many animals housed in close quarters. Shelter pets aren’t dirty!

Have you recently adopted a pet and need to make an appointment for their initial vaccinations and examination? We’re here to help. Set up an office visit at your vet clinic Murrieta, CA.

Xylitol and Its Danger for Your Pet

Have you ever heard of xylitol? It’s a sugar substitute found in many candies, gums, baked goods, and other products, like toothpaste. Xylitol is fine for humans, but very bad for pets! Learn more here from a vet Crown Point, IN.

Symptoms

The symptoms of xylitol can manifest themselves in as little as 30 minutes after your pet ingests something containing the poison. Symptoms include lethargy, uncoordinated movements, loss of appetite, and—without prompt treatment—seizures, coma, and even death. Rush your pet to the emergency room if you know or suspect that they’ve ingested xylitol.

Treatment

Your pet’s stomach may need to be flushed to rid the body of the toxin, and activated charcoal might help slow the absorption rate in body. As a pet recovers, supportive measures like fluid replacement and oxygen supplementation might be necessary.

How to Prevent Poisoning

As is the case with all poisonings, it’s easier to prevent xylitol poisoning than deal with it! Keep chocolate, candies, and all sweets out of your pet’s reach—store them in closed containers, cabinets, or the refrigerator.

Want to learn more about xylitol and other dangerous pet poisons? We’re here for you. Call your veterinarian Crown Point, IN.

Putting Your Pet on a Diet

While a large part of helping your pet to lose weight involves exercising them, you can’t forget about the other side of the equation: improving their diet. Here, your Aurora, CO vet tells you about three important components of putting your pet on a diet.

Food Choice

It’s important to think about the type of food your pet is being given. If they’re receiving a “budget” diet with a lot of filler material and empty calories, they’re not getting the nutrients they need for good health. They’re also probably packing on excess pounds! Ask your vet about upgrading to a premium diet.

Scheduled Meals

Work with your vet to determine a schedule for mealtimes, setting food out and then removing it after a predetermined amount of time. This prevents your pet from overeating, and it helps to regulate her diet and weight.

Portion Control

Last but not least, make sure to ask your veterinarian about a measured portion size for your pet’s meals. Portion control is an essential part of any great diet plan!

Do you need help getting your pet to lose weight? We’re here to help with all of your pet-care needs. Call your vet clinic Aurora, CO.

Your Pet and Probiotics

Probiotics have been around in the human healthcare world for some time, and you may have even tried some yourself. Did you know that probiotics can also help our four-legged friends? Learn more about probiotics and your pet from your Frisco, TX veterinarian.

What Are Probiotics?

A probiotic is a beneficial microbe that lives in your pet’s small or large intestine. They help to keep the “bad” microbes from affecting your pet’s health by helping to digest food, manufacture vitamins and other nutrients, and destroy pathogens. For pets, a probiotic might come in capsule or tablet form, a yogurt or kefir product, or it may be included in pet food.

What Can Probiotics Do for Pets?

Probiotics may be given to pets to help regulate digestive health, manage or correct infections and infestations, or even to help minimize stress. Since probiotics help maintain the proper intestinal microbial balance, they’re often prescribed to help with many kinds of health issues that cause digestive problems.

Does My Pet Need a Probiotic?

Don’t give your pet a probiotic until clearing it with your veterinarian. That way, you make sure your pet stays safe!

To learn more, contact your pet clinic Frisco, TX today.

Learn More About Microchips

Is your pet outfitted with a microchip? It’s simply the best way to make sure your pet stays properly identified at all times. Learn more about the basics of microchips as your Glendale, AZ veterinarian elaborates below:

What is a Microchip, Exactly?

A microchip is a tiny computer chip, housed inside a small glass capsule, that is implanted under your pet’s skin. The chip contains a number, implanted electronically, that corresponds with the chip manufacturer’s database. That database contains your pet’s contact information, so when a lost pet is relinquished to a vet’s office or animal shelter, scanning devices there can find out who the lost pet belongs to.

What’s the Procedure Like?

The chip capsule is inserted under your pet’s skin with a specialized hypodermic needle. The process only takes a moment or two, and is virtually risk-free—all your pet will feel is a momentary pinch. All in all, it’s just like a regular vaccination!

How Do I Get My Pet Microchipped?

If you’re ready to have your pet microchipped for a lifetime of great identification, set up an appointment with your animal hospital Glendale, AZ. We’re here to help with all of your most important pet-care needs!

Combatting Pet Obesity

Obesity is a big problem among our dogs and cats. Nearly half of all domesticated animals are overweight! Here are some tips from your veterinarian Marietta, GA to help combat pet obesity in your household.

Serving Size

Overfeeding is one of the leading causes of obesity among cats and dogs. That’s why feeding your pet in a proper portion size is so effective! Ask your vet about a measured portion size for your companion’s needs, and stick to that during every meal. Remove uneaten food after about 20 minutes or so.

Diet Type

Is your pet eating a “budget” food with lots of filler material? That means she’s only getting a lot of empty calories and packing on extra weight. It’s time to upgrade your pet’s diet! Consult your vet for a recommendation on a high-quality food for your pet.

Exercise Tips

Exercising your pet daily is the other major way that you’ll combat pet obesity; there’s just no way around it! Get your pet moving with brisk walks around the block or fun play sessions indoors.

Does your pet need a veterinary exam? Want more advice on slimming down your animal companion? Call your veterinary clinic Marietta, GA today.