Money-Saving Tips for Pet Owners

We know you would never sacrifice your pet’s health or well-being—with that being said, it would definitely be nice to save a little money here and there when it comes to animal care. There are a few ways to do just that! Learn more from a vet Marietta, GA.

Practice Prevention

Have your pet wear year-round preventative medications to ward off fleas, ticks, and parasitic worms. Keep them updated with essential vaccinations to avoid diseases like parvovirus, hepatitis, distemper, rabies, and more. Prevention is always far cheaper than treatment, and more effective!

Use Portion Control

Don’t waste food by overfeeding your pet; it’s also wasting money. Plus, you’re likely contributing to dangerous obesity, which can be costly, time-consuming, and troublesome to reverse later in life. Ask your vet to provide a precise portion size that works for your pet.

Spay and Neuter

Spaying and neutering don’t just prevent unplanned litters. It also eliminates or reduces the chance of many cancer types, and even makes urinary tract infections and other common health issues less likely to occur. All in all, it’s essential for keeping your pet healthy while saving money!

Contact your vet clinic Marietta, GA to make an appointment.

Outdoor Safety Tips for Your Dog

When the weather warms up, it’s a safe bet you’ll start spending more time outdoors with your canine companion. It’s important to keep your dog’s safety in mind when going on walks or hikes! Use these tips from a veterinarian Lafayette, LA to do just that:

Toxic Plant Life

There is a long list of potentially harmful plants and flowers for dogs. Some common offenders include lilies, ivy, oleander, dieffenbachia, elephant ear, rhododendron (also called azalea), poinsettias, various types of aloe plants, tulips, and daffodils. Check the ASPCA’s website for a full list.

Pests

Going outdoors means dealing with fleas, ticks, worms, and other parasitic pests that could harm your dog. Keep him on year-round preventative medications to ward off these critters; it’s far easier than dealing with an infection or infestation after the fact! Consult your vet if your dog is in need.

Identification

Even the most well-trained dogs can run away or escape. The trick is keeping them properly identified with a microchip, up-to-date ID tags, or both. This way, your pooch has the best chance of finding his way home.

For help getting your dog prepared for the great outdoors, contact your vet clinic Lafayette, LA today.

The Basics of Dog and Cat Vaccination

If you own a dog or cat or are considering adopting one soon, vaccination will be an essential part of your pet’s good health. Learn the basics of pet vaccination from your veterinarian Ellicott City, MD:

Core Vaccines

The core vaccines are considered essential for all pets. That’s because of the dangerous and/or contagious characteristics of the diseases they prevent; core vaccines include those that protect against distemper, parvovirus, influenza, hepatitis, rabies and more.

Non-Core Vaccines

As the name implies, non-core vaccines aren’t needed for every cat or dog. They might help some, though, based on factors like exposure risk, environment, and location, etc. The Lyme disease vaccination, for instance, is recommended for pets living in areas where disease-carrying ticks are prevalent.

Scheduling

Most pets can receive vaccines as early as eight weeks of age or so. From there, the initial vaccine regimen concludes at about 16 weeks. Most vaccinations then need booster shots to help them remain effective over the course of your pet’s life—these may occur on a yearly or multi-year basis.

For more information about your pet’s vaccines, contact your veterinary clinic Ellicott City, MD. We’re here to help with all of your pet-care needs!

Explaining Your Cat’s Kneading

You’ve probably seen your cat knead—it’s when your cat presses the front paws into a soft object before lying down. Have you ever wondered why Fluffy does this? Your vet Marietta, GA fills you in on a few possibilities below:

Napping Prep

You’ve likely seen your cat knead before bedding down for a nap. It’s believed that our cats’ ancestors kneaded grass or dirt surfaces in the wild, preparing them as a bedding spot for themselves or their offspring. This behavior may have gotten passed down to our domesticated felines!

Territory Marking

Your cat’s paw pads contain scent glands, and scents are released when your cat kneads. It may be her way of marking her territory—that territory might be a pillow, a pet bed, or your leg!

Nursing Instinct

Did you know that kittens often knead their mother’s belly during the nursing period to stimulate milk production? Adult cats may knead as a sort of “remnant” behavior from kitten-hood, and they may even associate the action with the feelings of contentment they felt while nursing!

Want more information on your cat’s behavior? We’re here for you. Call your veterinarian Marietta, GA today to learn more about your pet.

Disaster Preparedness for Pet Owners

It’s no fun to think about a disaster situation befalling you or your pet. With that being said, being prepared is the best course of action! Here are a few disaster preparedness tips for pet owners from your veterinary clinic Glendale, AZ.

To-Go Kit

Have a to-go kit on hand in case you have to evacuate your home. Include a first-aid kit with all of the essential first-aid supplies, canned pet food and a can opener, water bottles and a water dish, soft towels, a pet bed, a leash and collar, and your pet’s updated medical records.

Plan Ahead

Research animal shelters, relief organizations, and pet-friendly hotels outside of town; you may have to visit these areas if you’re forced away from your home by a natural disaster, chemical spill, or some other catastrophe.

At Home

Think about a room in the middle of your home that doesn’t have windows. This is the best area you can go to if you’re forced to stay home during a disaster.

If you would like more tips about preparing for a disaster situation ahead of time and keeping your pet safe, contact your veterinary clinic Glendale, AZ. We’re here to help!

Common Cat Toxins

Although dogs are often more likely to gobble up whatever substance is in front of them, putting them at a somewhat greater risk for poisoning, cats are also susceptible! Here, your vet Aurora, CO tells you about some of the most common cat toxins to be aware of.

Poisonous Plants

Plenty of plants and flowers aren’t safe for cats, and they’re some of the most common toxins since our feline friends often like to munch on vegetation. Lilies are particularly poisonous, and other plants like dieffenbachia, elephant ear, certain aloe plants, rhododendron, and more can also pose a serious risk. Keep your cat away!

Human Foods

Garlic, onions, grapes and raisins, chocolate, candy, gum, alcohol… the list of potentially harmful foods is quite long! Don’t leave dangerous foods out on countertops; you know how easy it is for cats to leap up and start exploring!

Antifreeze

Antifreeze is a particular problem during the winter months; it contains ethylene glycol, a poisonous alcohol substance. The problem is that antifreeze tastes and smells sweet, which may attract your cat! Use antifreeze carefully and clean up spills right away.

For more information on cat toxins, give your pet clinic Aurora, CO a call.

Preventative Measures for Your Pet’s Good Health

It’s far easier to prevent a problem than deal with it later. This is definitely true when it comes to your pet’s health! Use these tips as discussed by a Thorold, ON vet to maintain your pet’s health over time:

Vaccination

Have your pet vaccinated to protect against distemper, parvovirus, influenza, hepatitis, rabies, and other serious diseases? Ask your vet about a booster shot schedule to keep these vaccinations effective over time. It’s a great way to avoid harmful disease throughout your pet’s life!

Pest Control

Fleas, ticks, worms, and mosquitoes all present a hazard to your cat or dog. Ward them off ahead of time by having your pet wear preventative medications. If your pet is in need, contact your vet right away to get your companion set up with the proper preventatives.

Quality Diet

Feeding your pet a high-quality diet is an easy way to maintain their great health. Ask your vet to recommend a food choice that works well for your pet’s age, breed, and weight. Fed in the proper portion size, it’s one of the absolute best ways to keep your pet in tip-top shape!

Contact your pet clinic Thorold, ON for your pet’s veterinary needs.

Dog Grooming Basics

Although your dog’s grooming routine helps him look his absolute best, it’s also an important step for his overall health and well-being. Are you grooming your dog properly? Here, your Livonia, MI veterinarian tells you about the grooming steps that your dog needs.

Brushing

Brush your dog daily. Not only does it smooth the fur and get rid of grime, it spreads essential skin oils through the entire coat. This moisturizes your dog’s fur naturally and gives it a healthy, clean shine. It even reduces shedding!

Bathing

The occasional bath is another good step for your pooch’s grooming needs. Always use a shampoo formulated just for canines, as other shampoos may irritate your dog’s skin. Don’t overdo bathing—too much, and it can actually dry out the skin, leading to coarse fur and increased shedding.

Nail Trims

Trim your dog’s nails regularly using a canine-specific clipper. If nails become too long, they can snag painfully or even fracture. Don’t cut too far down, or you’ll snip the vein running into the nail and cause bleeding.

Do you need help with your dog’s grooming routine? Does your pooch need bathing products or a nail trim? Call your Vets Livonia, MI.

How to Help Your Senior Cat Thrive

Do you have an aging cat on your hands? Keep your elderly feline companion healthy and happy so that she enjoys her golden years! Below, your Plano, TX vet offers three easy tips to do just that:

Great Diet

All aging cats should be fed a specially formulated senior diet, which is made with just the right ingredients for your older cat’s nutritional needs. Ask your vet to recommend a great choice, and also be sure to ask about the portion that your cat needs.

Fun Toys

Cats need exercise, even older ones! Provide your companion with plenty of fun toys to let her entertain herself. Catnip toys are always a hit, but even a simple string dangled in front of Fluffy’s face will likely do the trick! Try to get your pet moving on a daily basis to help stave off obesity.

Napping Spots

Cats always love napping; your senior companion probably sleeps now more than ever! Make sure she has plenty of soft, warm beds to relax in throughout her golden years.

Does your senior cat need veterinary care? We’re here to help with all of your pet-care needs. Make an appointment at your animal hospital Plano TX.

Your Cat’s Hairballs

Hairballs are a part of life for most cat owners. Have you ever wondered what causes these unsightly expulsions, and if they are a problem? Learn more here as your Sugar Land, TX veterinarian fills you in.

What Causes Hairballs?

A cat naturally ingests some hair while grooming herself, thanks to tiny barbs on her tongue. Most of this hair passes through the digestive tract and is expelled in the feces, but some remains in the stomach and is eventually regurgitated in the form of a hairball.

Are Hairballs Safe?

The occasional hairball won’t cause your cat any harm; it’s a normal part of your cat’s life. However, if hairballs are becoming frequent or if they’ve suddenly started appearing more than normal, it’s worth a visit to the vet’s office. If your cat is retching and gagging but not actually producing a hairball, let your vet know.

How Can I Reduce Hairballs?

Ask your vet about a high-fiber “hairball formula” diet; these are made to help your cat shed less and move hair through the system more smoothly. Grooming your cat is also helpful since you’re trapping fur in your brush!

For more information, contact your vet Sugar Land, TX.