Why Does My Cat Knead?

You’ve probably seen your cat knead before, although you may not have known that the maneuver had a name. Kneading involves your cat pressing her front paws into a soft object in an alternate pattern. Learn about the reasons behind this behavior as your Bowmanville, ON vet tells you more.

Napping

Your cat’s ancient ancestors may have kneaded hard dirt or grass surfaces to prepare them as nests. It’s possible that your cat has retained this behavior through the generations—that’s why you probably see your cat knead before napping!

Nursing Instinct

Did you know that kittens often knead their mother’s belly during nursing? It’s thought that this action stimulates milk production in the mother. Your adult cat might experience feelings of contentment associated with children when they knead!

Territory Marking

Your cat’s paw pads contain scent glands, and these scents are released when Fluffy’s paws are pressed into an object. In this manner, your cat may be marking her territory while she kneads her bed, a pillow, or her favorite blanket.

Remember: all cats are unique, and all felines have their own fun quirks. For more information on your particular cat’s behavior patterns, contact your animal hospital Bowmanville, ON.

Three Signs of Sickness in Birds

Are you the proud owner of a pet bird? It’s up to you to know when Polly isn’t feeling well. Below, your Cherry Hill, NJ vet tells you about three of the early signs of illness in birds so that you can act quickly.

Cere Problems

Your bird’s cere is essentially their nose—it’s the area just above the beak where your bird’s nostrils are. If you see crusts dried around this area, or notice a discharge or other abnormalities, it’s time to let your veterinarian know. These symptoms could be a sign of infection.

Ruffled Feathers

Many birds ruffle their feathers. Most don’t keep them ruffled for long, though. If you’ve noticed that your pet has kept their feathers ruffled for longer than a full day, it’s time to act! Call your vet to make sure your bird isn’t suffering.

Waste Changes

Although a bird’s waste can change slightly depending on what they eat, take note of drastic changes in the color, consistency, or frequency of your bird’s stools. It could be a sign that something is amiss.

With regular veterinary appointments, your bird can avoid health troubles before they begin. Make an appointment with your veterinary clinic Cherry Hill, NJ.

Kitchen Hazards for Pets

The kitchen is a hazardous place for pets, no matter how conscientious you are about safety in your home. Fortunately, a few simple precautionary measures can keep your animal companion safe! Below, your vet Plano, TX elaborates:

Toxic Foods

Of course, most kitchens contain at least a few harmful foods for pets. Onions, garlic, chives, grapes and raisins, chocolate, candy, gum, certain types of nuts, avocado, caffeinated foods and beverages, and more can pose a serious threat to your animal friend! Don’t leave anything harmful on kitchen countertops or tables where pets could gain access.

Sharp Objects

Knives, forks, soup can lids, graters, pizza cutters… there is no shortage of sharp objects and edges in your kitchen that could hurt your pet. Store all sharp objects carefully where they belong so that your pet can’t cut themselves by accident.

Hot Surfaces

Hot surfaces like coffeepots, toasters, boiling pots of water, and more pose a burn risk to your pet. It’s safest to keep your pet out of the kitchen when using a heating appliance, especially if your pet can jump high enough to get on the counters.

Want more safety tips for your pet? Contact your veterinarian Plano, TX today.

Pest Control for Your Dog or Cat

Parasites are some of the most troublesome, yet most preventable, health concerns out there for our cats and dogs. Below, your Scottsdale, AZ veterinarian tells you about the most common pet pests and how to keep your animal companion safe.

Worms

Heartworms, roundworms, flatworms… there are all sorts of worms waiting to invade your pet’s system. Stop these creepy crawlers in their tracks by having your pet wear a proper worm preventative. For most pets, a heartworm preventative will take care of the danger from all typical worm types.

Fleas

Flea infestations can be difficult to eradicate, and fleas can easily jump from an infected pet to other animals in the home, or even humans. A severe flea infestation can even lead to life-threatening anemia if left untreated! Ask your vet about the right flea preventative for your pet.

Ticks

Ticks carry dangerous diseases like Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Don’t let your pet fall risk—a flea-and-tick preventative medicine will be necessary to make sure that your pet doesn’t fall ill from tick bites.

Does your pet need set up with preventative medications? We’re here for you! Call your veterinary clinic Scottsdale, AZ today to get started.

Why Spay or Neuter Your Cat?

Spaying or neutering your cat has one obvious advantage: you won’t have a sudden, unexpected litter of kittens on your hands. Spaying and neutering also offer other advantages! Your veterinarian Rochester, NY tells you more below:

Health Benefits

A cat who has been spayed or neutered doesn’t have a risk of developing genital cancers, and the risk of prostate, breast, and other cancer types is greatly minimized. Urinary tract infections are a particular problem amongst cats, and these are far less likely to occur in cats who have been spayed or neutered.

Improved Behavior

Aggression in male cats, spraying behavior, loud vocalizations and urine spraying during the heat period of female cats… problems like these can be virtually eliminated or greatly lessened simply by having your pet spayed or neutered. Why not avoid these issues before they begin?

The Greater Good

Of course, spaying and neutering, in general, is important for the greater good of animal welfare. Every year, millions of cats go homeless or must be euthanized simply because there are too many. Don’t contribute to pet overpopulation by allowing your cat to breed unchecked.

Does your cat need spayed or neutered? Call your animal hospital Rochester, NY for help.

Giving Your Puppy a Bath

It’s always a good idea to get your puppy used to bathe early on in life. This way, they grow up thinking of bathing as a completely normal part of life! Here, your veterinarian Livonia, MI goes over the basics of bathing your pup.

Getting Started

Gather together your supplies by the tub or sink where you’ll be bathing Fido. You’ll need a canine-specific shampoo, a bucket, and a large, soft towel.

Shampoo

Fill the tub or sink with just an inch or two of lukewarm water, and gently set your puppy in it on all fours to get him used to the sensation. When he’s ready, use your bucket to gently pour more lukewarm water over the body to wet the coat. Dab a small amount of shampoo into the fur and massage it through.

Rinse and Dry

Once your pup has been shampooed thoroughly, rinse him off with more water from the bucket. Dry your dog with the towel, and offer him a few tasty treats as a reward.

Does your puppy need professional grooming services? Want further advice on bathing your dog? We’re here for you—set up an appointment today with your veterinary clinic Livonia, MI.

Hazard Spots for Your Pet at Home

Your pet is safest at home with you and your family. Having said that, every home contains its danger zones! Below, your veterinarian Columbia, MD tells you how to keep your pet safe from hazard spots at home.

Kitchen

Kitchens contain everything from toxic food, sharp objects, and hot surfaces to danger-filled garbage bags and cleaning supplies. It’s a treasure trove of dangers for your pet! It’s best to keep your four-legged friend out of the kitchen when cooking to reduce the risk.

Medicine Cabinet

Don’t let your pet gain access to the medicine cabinet. Everything from antidepressants and aspirin to over-the-counter drugs and prescription pills can poison a pet who manages to ingest too much—child-proof caps may be no match for your pet’s jaws! Also be sure to keep your own medications stored separately from those of your pet.

Supply Closet

Various common cleaning supplies—household disinfectants, toilet bowl cleaner, air fresheners, carpet shampoo, and much more—can prove toxic to a pet. Move pets elsewhere when using strong chemicals, and keep the supply closet closed tightly at all times.

Does your pet require medical attention? Call your animal hospital Columbia, MD today for help from the professionals.

Selecting a Leash for Your Dog

Have you recently adopted a dog? A leash is one essential that you can’t go without! The question is, how do you know what kind of leash to purchase? Your vet Marietta, GA elaborates below:

The Standard Leash

The vast majority of dogs will do just fine with a standard leash. These are typically about six feet long and are most often made of nylon. They may also be made of leather or another material. The standard leash has a loop at one end and a clasping mechanism at the other, which attaches to your dog’s collar.

Retractable Leashes

Retractable leashes have a spring mechanism that allows your dog to roam away from you until the leash runs out. They’re a great way to give your dog a little freedom on the leash, but use caution: it’s easy for dogs to dart away before you can gain control of them.

Training Leashes

Training leashes may be made of special materials or might be extra long or short. Unless directed to use one by a veterinary professional or animal trainer, it’s not necessary to select one for your canine companion.

For more information on dog leashes, contact your veterinarians Marietta, GA.

Your Pet’s Emergency Kit

The only sensible way to deal with an emergency situation is to be prepared ahead of time. When it comes to your pet, an emergency kit can help you do that! Learn what to include in your pet’s kit from a veterinary clinic Colorado Springs, CO.

First-Aid Basics

Assemble or purchase a first-aid kit for your pet. Items to pack include bandages, gauze, a pet-safe disinfectant, tweezers, a set of nail clippers, styptic powder or a styptic pen to staunch bleeding, soft towels, a pet thermometer, and a few pairs of latex gloves to protect your hands.

Pet Meds

Does your pet take medications to treat or manage a condition? It’s always a good idea to pack a supply in your pet’s emergency kit so that you always know where it is. Check the expatriation dates frequently to make sure your pet’s medications don’t need to be replaced.

Medical Records

Medical records—documentation of recent medical work, proof of ownership and vaccinations, etc.—can be lifesavers in an emergency situation, especially if you find yourself at an unfamiliar vet’s office or shelter. Pack these documents in a waterproof bag.

Want help assembling your pet’s emergency care kit? Call your pet clinic Colorado Springs, CO.

Getting Your Dog Used to Car Rides

Many of our canine companions don’t take kindly to the car. Of course, since car rides are going to be a part of life for most dogs, it’s important to get your pooch acclimated! Use these tips from a vet Savannah, GA to do just that:

In the Driveway

Before going on any trips with your dog, simply let him explore the vehicle while it’s sitting in the driveway, turned off. This way, he gets used to the sights and smells of the car. You can entice your pooch with toys or treats to help him associate positive feelings with the car as well!

Practice Runs

Once your dog is more comfortable in the car, go on short drives around the neighborhood, or perhaps to a local park. This will get Fido used to the sensation of moving, and he’ll realize that not all car rides result in an anxiety-inducing trip to the vet’s office.

During Your Ride

It’s always best to keep your dog secured in his crate for car rides, as he’ll be safest there. Try cracking a window or playing music at a low volume to soothe Fido.

For more car-ride tips, call your veterinarian Savannah, GA.