Introducing Two Dogs

Are you about to introduce a new dog to your current canine companion? Perhaps you’re setting up a doggy play date. In either case, it’s important to introduce two dogs properly and safely so that things go smoothly. Here, your Frisco, TX veterinarian gives you a few tips on doing just that.

Prepare a Neutral Territory

Step one is finding a neutral territory for the two dogs to meet. Pick a spot that neither dog has “claimed,” like a public park or a neighbor’s yard, so there is no territorial behavior. Make sure space is safe for the dogs; remove anything they could fight over (toys, bones, food, treats, etc.) as well as sharp objects and other hazards.

Take it Slow

Rule number one when having two dogs meet: take things slow. Let the dogs see each other from afar, then slowly move forward. Don’t let the dogs run-up to each other. Keep them leashed so that you can pull them away from each other if necessary.

Moving Forward

At home, keep separate areas for the dogs moving forward while they get to know each other better.

Need help with your dog’s behavior? Call your animal hospital Frisco, TX.

The Dangers of Marijuana for Dogs

Veterinarians have seen an increase in marijuana ingestion and poisoning in dogs, especially as the drug continues to become legalized in several states. It’s not safe for our canine companions! Here, your veterinarian Frisco, TX tells you all about the dangers of marijuana for dogs.

Can Dogs Get High?

Yes, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana—tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC—affects dogs in a similar way to that of humans. However, it’s important to realize that dogs are much smaller than humans, so small amounts of THC have a much greater effect. Plus, dogs don’t realize what they’re ingesting and won’t be prepared for the effects the way a human is.

What are the Symptoms of Poisoning?

A dog that is exposed to THC may experience incontinence, hypersensitivity to touch and sound, and loss of coordination. “Edibles,” or foods that are made with marijuana as an ingredient, are also dangerous because a dog may ingest a lot of butter, sugar, or fat, which can prove hazardous.

What if My Dog Ingests Marijuana?

Take your dog to the emergency room if they’ve ingested marijuana. Supportive fluids may be given, or vomiting may be induced.

Call your vet clinic Frisco, TX to learn more.

Caring for Your Brachycephalic Dog

Brachycephalic dogs—breeds with squashed, flat faces like Boston terriers, pugs, English and French bulldogs, and the Pekingese—come with several unique care requirements and health risks. That’s why it’s important to take special care of your brachycephalic pet! Learn more here from a veterinarian Frisco, TX.

Keep Brachy Cool

Most brachycephalic breeds have small nostrils, a narrow windpipe, and an elongated soft palate, which presents breathing challenges. Since dogs pant to cool down, rather than sweating, it’s very easy for a brachycephalic dog to overheat! Keep your branchy cool at all times, and don’t over-exercise them.

Avoid Stress

For the same reason, don’t allow your brachycephalic dog to become stressed. Too much stress will lead to respiratory problems, and it won’t be as easy for your brachy to recover as it would be for other dog breeds.

Dental Care

Thanks to your brachy’s unique facial structure, the teeth tend to crowd together; other dental problems are also very common. Brush your pet’s teeth with a canine formulated toothpaste, and be sure to have their mouth examined at the vet’s office regularly.

Does your brachycephalic dog need a checkup? We’re here for you. Call your veterinary clinic Frisco, TX today!

Beware of These In-Home Pet Danger Zones

Your pet is certainly most comfortable and happy within the walls of your home—with that being said, there are some danger spots to be aware of! Keep your pet safe with the following tips from a Frisco, TX veterinary professional:

The Kitchen

Your kitchen contains plenty of pet hazards, from sharp objects like knives, graters, and soup can lids to hot surfaces such as toasters, coffee pots, and stovetops. There are also, of course, plenty of foods that pets shouldn’t eat. The list includes chocolate, candy, onions, garlic, alcohol, salt, caffeine, avocado, and much more.

Supply Closets

Plenty of common cleaning supplies—household disinfectants, bleach, carpet shampoo, furniture polish, bathtub cleaner, and more—can harm pets who manage to ingest them. Restrict your pet’s access to supply closets at all times.

Medicine Cabinets

Did you know that everything from antidepressants and aspirin to prescription pills and cough syrup can harm pets? Keep your medicine cabinet shut tightly at all times, and never mix up your own medications with those of your pet.

For more great tips on keeping your pet safe at home, contact your Veterinarian Frisco, TX today. We’re here to help with all of your pet-care needs!