Your Dog and Pink Eye

You’ve probably heard of pink eye; it’s relatively common in the human healthcare world. Pink eye can also affect dogs! Learn more below from your London, ON vet.

What Causes Pink Eye?

Pink eye, known medically as conjunctivitis, involves inflammation of the conjunctiva or the tissues around your dog’s eyes. It can occur entirely on its own (primary conjunctivitis), or secondarily to another disease or health issue (secondary conjunctivitis). Common causes include bacterial or viral infections, foreign bodies in the eye, glaucoma, eye trauma, and allergies.

What are the Signs?

The main sign of pink eye is a red and inflamed eye or eyelids. Other symptoms include excessive blinking, pawing at the yes, increased tear production, and eye discharge. Conjunctivitis most often occurs in both eyes simultaneously, although it can affect only one eye at a time.

How Is Pink Eye Treated?

First, your vet will perform a full eye exam. Next, the pink eye will need to be treated depending on what’s causing the issue at its root. In most cases, anti-inflammatory medication can be given to lessen the swelling and redness.

Does your dog need a veterinary exam? We’re here to help. Contact your vet clinic London, ON.

Pet Toxins You Have in Your Home

That’s right—you have a few pet toxins in your home already, no matter how conscientious you are about pet safety. When you’re aware of the hazards, you can keep your animal companion safe! Here, your veterinarian London, ON tells you more.

Toxic Foods

All sorts of human foods are dangerous for pets. The list includes chocolate and candy, garlic, onions, chives, leeks, scallions, shallots, grapes and raisins, salty foods, rich or buttery foods, and alcohol, among others. Keep your pet away!

Cleaning Supplies

It’s safe to say that almost any cleaning product shouldn’t be ingested by your pet. Everything from carpet cleaner and furniture polish to household disinfectants and bleach can cause serious harm. Keep cleaning supplies safely locked away in the supply closet where pets can’t reach.

Plants and Flowers

There are plenty of plants and flowers that are toxic to pets, including Amaryllis, dieffenbachia, elephant ear, ivy, oleander, rhododendron (also called azalea), philodendron, the sago palm, lilies, daffodils, tulips, and more. Check your home for common offenders, and remove them so that your pet can’t gain access.

To learn more about pet toxins already in your home, contact your vet London, ON. We’re always here to help!

Learn About Fluffy’s Favorite Plant

If you’ve tried catnip on your feline friend, you’ve probably seen the amusing reactions: cats tend to dart this way and that in an excited manner, and some simply stretch out in a state of bliss. How much do you really know about your cat’s favorite plant? Learn more here from a veterinarian London, ON.

What is Catnip, Anyway?

Catnip is an herb, similar to mint. It grows in the wild, but you’ll purchase a dried, processed version in a pet store. Catnip can also be infused into sprays or included in cat toys.

What Causes the Reaction?

The oils of the catnip plant contain a chemical substance, nepetalactone, that triggers a reaction in your cat’s brain. It’s perfectly harmless, and the effects only last a few minutes or so.

Why Isn’t My Cat Reacting?

Is your cat seemingly unaffected by catnip? Don’t worry—your pet is perfectly healthy. It turns out that cats need a particular gene, inherited from their parents, to experience the chemical reaction caused by nepetalactone. If they don’t have it, catnip won’t do much at all!

Learn more about catnip and your cat’s behavior by calling your animal hospital London, ON.

Giving Your Cat Milk

It’s easy to picture a cat lapping up milk—the two just seem to go hand in hand. However, cats and milk really don’t mix! Here, your Riverbend, ON vet tells you more about your cat, dairy, and milk.

Why Can’t Cats Drink Milk?

It turns out that most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning that they can’t properly digest lactose. If a cat ingests too much milk, they’ll experience an upset stomach at the very least, and are likely to exhibit vomiting or diarrhea.

Don’t Kittens Need Milk?

Yes, kittens require their mother’s milk (or a synthetic substitute) during the early stage of life for proper growth. After that, milk doesn’t need to be a part of the diet. As cats age, they produce less and less lactase in the gut, which allows them to digest lactose. By the time a kitten is grown, they’re most likely lactose-intolerant!

Is Any Dairy Safe?

Dairy foods of any kind—cheese, yogurt, etc.—aren’t nutritionally necessary for cats, and too much could cause problems. A commercially available “cat milk” that has had all lactose removed is a much better idea!

Contact your vet clinic Riverbend, ON to learn more about cats and milk.