The Dangers of Marijuana for Dogs

Veterinarians have seen an increase in marijuana ingestion and poisoning in dogs, especially as the drug continues to become legalized in several states. It’s not safe for our canine companions! Here, your veterinarian Frisco, TX tells you all about the dangers of marijuana for dogs.

Can Dogs Get High?

Yes, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana—tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC—affects dogs in a similar way to that of humans. However, it’s important to realize that dogs are much smaller than humans, so small amounts of THC have a much greater effect. Plus, dogs don’t realize what they’re ingesting and won’t be prepared for the effects the way a human is.

What are the Symptoms of Poisoning?

A dog that is exposed to THC may experience incontinence, hypersensitivity to touch and sound, and loss of coordination. “Edibles,” or foods that are made with marijuana as an ingredient, are also dangerous because a dog may ingest a lot of butter, sugar, or fat, which can prove hazardous.

What if My Dog Ingests Marijuana?

Take your dog to the emergency room if they’ve ingested marijuana. Supportive fluids may be given, or vomiting may be induced.

Call your vet clinic Frisco, TX to learn more.

Caring for Your Brachycephalic Dog

Brachycephalic dogs—breeds with squashed, flat faces like Boston terriers, pugs, English and French bulldogs, and the Pekingese—come with several unique care requirements and health risks. That’s why it’s important to take special care of your brachycephalic pet! Learn more here from a veterinarian Frisco, TX.

Keep Brachy Cool

Most brachycephalic breeds have small nostrils, a narrow windpipe, and an elongated soft palate, which presents breathing challenges. Since dogs pant to cool down, rather than sweating, it’s very easy for a brachycephalic dog to overheat! Keep your branchy cool at all times, and don’t over-exercise them.

Avoid Stress

For the same reason, don’t allow your brachycephalic dog to become stressed. Too much stress will lead to respiratory problems, and it won’t be as easy for your brachy to recover as it would be for other dog breeds.

Dental Care

Thanks to your brachy’s unique facial structure, the teeth tend to crowd together; other dental problems are also very common. Brush your pet’s teeth with a canine formulated toothpaste, and be sure to have their mouth examined at the vet’s office regularly.

Does your brachycephalic dog need a checkup? We’re here for you. Call your veterinary clinic Frisco, TX today!

Helping Your Cat Control Her Hairballs

For most cats, the occasional hairball is a natural part of life. Since cats ingest their own fur while grooming themselves, what doesn’t get excreted in feces gets coughed back up. However, you can do a few things to help your cat’s hairball production go down. Learn more below from your vet Frisco, TX.

Grooming

Brush your cat daily; this removes loose fur from the coat, lessening the amount ingested and regurgitated by your feline friend. Plus, brushing helps to spread essential skin oils through the fur to moisturize the coat naturally, reducing shedding at the outset.

Diet Choice

If your cat isn’t receiving a quality diet, her digestive process may be inhibited. When she eats a high-quality, well-balanced cat food, though, her digestive system works at peak efficiency to help move hair through the digestive tract quickly and smoothly. This results in less hairballs!

Veterinary Visit

If your cat’s hairball production is extremely high or has seemingly increased dramatically in a short period of time, it’s important to get your pet to the vet’s office. Medical issues could be to blame—make an appointment with your animal hospital Frisco, TX to make sure your cat stays healthy and happy.